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Chong Yon Park 6 Articles
Job Analyses of Health Care Managers in Group Health Care System.
Kyoo Sang Kim, Chong Yon Park, Jaehoon Roh
Korean J Prev Med. 1994;27(4):777-792.
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AbstractAbstract PDF
For developing the Group Health care system, health managers' job structure were analysed in the aspects of content, amount, and process. As a trial research, data were collected by a standardized job analysis table to 6 doctors, 40 nurses, and 11 industrial hygienists of Group Health Care System. Health care managers were performing complex and intellectual jobs such as health education for workers, managing health care, conference as well as more simple jobs like as filling diary. Especially, job was consisted of general job and health care management job in the proportion of 1:2.18. The major general job were data management related with the health statistics, and major health care management jobs were managing health care, health counselling, environmental management of working sites. Each specific jobs were required differentiated intellectual capacity, creativity, autonomy, psychic stress, and physical work; most respondents perceived that health care management jobs should require more inputs than general jobs Additionally job satisfaction and perceived need on specific job items were analysed. Results of this research, suggested through the field experiences in working sites, should be considered for improving the Group Health Care System.
Summary
Perception and attitude toward group health management and service system for small and medium industries in Inchon.
Chong Yon Park, Jae Hoon Roh, Kyoo Sang Kim, Kyung Jong Lee, Young Hahn Moon
Korean J Prev Med. 1993;26(1):86-95.
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AbstractAbstract PDF
To investigate perception and attitude toward Group Health Management and Services System for Small and Medium Industries, a survey using self-administered questionnaire was conducted to a part of industries in Inchon, at October 1992. Major dependent variables were perception, attitude, and practice related with Group Health Management and Service System; these variables were measured by 3-point Likert like scale consisted of 7, 5, and 5 items, respectively. Data were collected in 149 industries, 72.7% out of 205. Perception was slightly high, 1.25; attitude was some positive, 1.46; and practice was some passive, 0.94. Major determinants of perception, attitude, and practice were sex and age of industry's health manager; perception influenced upon attitude, and perception and attitude had positive effect upon practice. To activate Group Health Management and Service System, it is necessary to develop education and promotion programs for industry's health managers of small and medium industries.
Summary
Social Factors in Recruiting Physicians and Dentists.
Seung Hum Yu, Chong Yon Park
Korean J Prev Med. 1990;23(4):428-435.
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AbstractAbstract PDF
This study was designed to investigate whether recruitment of physicians and dentists has been restricted to a social network, such as familial or kinship groups. The data was collected through a self-administered questionnaire survey distributed to a sampling of general physicians, specialists (internists, surgeons, other specialists), and dentists in August 1990. The major findings are as follows: 1) Total number of respondents was 405; of these, general physicians made up 48.9%, internists 10.4%, surgeons 15.8%, other specialists 4.9%, and dentists 20.0%. 2) 38.5% of the respondents had physicians or dentists in their immediate family or were related in some way to one. Those from urban areas, whose parents were highly educated, and whose father was a professional had more physicians or dentists in their family or kinship. 3) Parents of 7.1% of the respondents, brothers or sisters of 10.1%, grand parents of 1.7%, uncles or aunts of 7.9%, and cousins of 22.0% were physicians or dentists. 4) The majority of physicians or dentists in familial or kinship network specialized in surgery, 32.3%, followed by internal medicine ; current worksites were noted as clinics by 30.8%, followed by general hospital, university hospital, and so on. The respondent's major discipline tended to follow familial or kinship example. Consequently, it was concluded that physicians and dentists have been recruited within restricted familial or kinship network.
Summary
A Comparative Study of Two Survey Methods for Health Services Research Modified Self-administered Questionnaire vs. Interview Survey.
Seung Hum Yu, Yong Ho Lee, Woo Hyun Cho, Chong Yon Park
Korean J Prev Med. 1988;21(2):431-441.
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AbstractAbstract PDF
The purpose of this study was to compare the difference of two survey methods for health services research. Data were collected by means of two types of household survey conducted from March 11 to September 19, 1985. A probability sample of 30,613 persons was taken from 180 Enumerated Districts designated by the Economic Planning Board. The sample was divided into two groups systematically. One group was surveyed by the self-administered questionnaire and the other group was interviewed. Response rates were 81.4% and 90.6% respectively. The data were analyzed by the ratio of the results of the self-administered survey to those of the interview survey. No difference was observed in sex, age, residence, or occupation between the two groups. However the respondents' characteristics were statistically different between the two groups. The major findings of this study are as follows : 1. The morbidity rate was 142.5 per 1,000 persons during the two week period by the self-administered questionnaire survey and 74.3 per 1,000 persons with the interview survey method. The ratio of the morbidity rate by the self-administered questionnaire to that by the interview was 1.92, and the difference between the two rates were due to the personal characteristics. 2. The out-patient utilization rate was 10.2 visits per person per year by the self-administered questionnaire survey and 5.4 by the interview survey, and the ratio was 1.89; the admission rate was 3.2 times per 100 persons per year by the self-administered questionnaire survey and 1.9 times by the interview survey, and the ratio was 1.68. Differences due to the sociodemographic characteristics were greater in the out-patient utilization rates than in the admission rates. 3. Percentages of effective medical care demand were 90.2% in the self-administered survey and 92.3% in the interview survey; the ratio was 0.98 which was less than that of the morbidity rate and medical care utilization. But, differences of effective medical care demand occurred in persons with no occupation, and aged or low educated respondents. 4. Respiratory illness had the highest frequency in the two survey methods. But there was a slight difference between the two survey methods in morbidity composition. 5. It was concluded that data collected by the interview survey were inclined to be underestimated and this problem can be corrected by a modified self-administered survey.
Summary
Changing Patterns of Ambulatory Care Utilization of a Rural Community in a Regional Medical Insurance Scheme.
Seung Hum Yu, Woo Hyun Cho, Myongsei Sohn, Chong Yon Park
Korean J Prev Med. 1988;21(2):419-430.
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AbstractAbstract PDF
This study was performed in a rural community, Kanghwa county which was introduced to a regional medical insurance pilot program in 1982. The purposes of this study were, firstly, to observe the changes in ambulatory care utilization in the three years 1982, 1983 and 1987 ; secondly, to analyse factors which convert perceived medical care needs to effective medical care demand. During the three periods, a serial interview survey was performed to determine the changes in medical utilization before and after the regional medical insurance program implementation. The number of subjects was 3,356 persons in the year 1982, 3,705 in 1983 and 2,745 in 1987. The results of the study were as follows : 1. Total ambulatory care utilization rates per 100 persons during a 2-week period were 23.6 in the year 1982, 21.8 in 1983, and 29.3 in 1987 ; and physician visit rates were 6.1 in 1982, 11.7 in 1983, and 14.9 in 1987. Thus, compared to the total utilization rate there was a definite increase in physician visit, and during the study periods there was a decrease in drug stores visits whereas an increase in hospital or clinic visits was noticed. 2. The rates of effective demand for medical care need were 70.7% in 1982, 70.5% in 1983 and 75.9% in 1987 ; and the rates of patients who visited physicians were 20.2% in 1982, 42.8% in 1983 and 35.6% in 1987. Thus, physician visits increased sharply by introducing the medical insurance program, but after the latent medical care demands were fulfilled, there was a slight decrease in the physician visits. 3. The number of acute symptoms and the number of chronic symptoms were common determinants of total ambulatory care utilization and physician visits. Besides the medical care need factors, age in 1982, sex and accessibility in 1983, and accessibility in 1987 were statistically significant determinants of the total utilization ; sex and accessibility in 1983, and education in 1987 were also statistically significant determinants of the physician visit. 4. For persons with perceived acute symptoms during the 2-week periods, accessibility in total utilization and age in physician visits were common discriminating factors of ambulatory care utilization in the three years, and education and income were also statistically significant variables For persons with perceived chronic symptoms, occupation and income were statistically significant discriminating variables commonly observed in total utilization and physician visits.
Summary
Health Care Utilization and Its Determinants among Island Inhabitants.
Seung Hum Yu, Woo Hyun Cho, Chong Yon Park, Myung Keun Lee
Korean J Prev Med. 1987;20(2):287-300.
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AbstractAbstract PDF
Island regions suffer from a shortage of health care in part because they are less developed, they cover a widespread area relative to the population, and due to transportation barriers. The purpose of this study was to assess the level of illness and the magnitude of medical care utilization, and to investigate the determinants of utilization in these area. The data were collected by means of a household survey conducted from February 16 to 25, 1987 on 5 islands which were selected in consideration of the size of the population, the distance from the main land, and the distribution of health care facilities. The household response rate was 89.1% (491 of 551 households), and 1971 persons were surveyed. The major findings of this study are as follows: 1) The morbidity rate of the island inhabitants was 27.7% during the two weeks, and 25.5 chronic illnesses and 9.1 acute illnesses per 100 persons, were noted. Differences in the magnitude of illness were statistically significant by sex, age, education, and family size. 2) The magnitude of total ambulatory care utilization was 16.8 visits per 100 persons during the two weeks, which was less than that of other regions; and differences in the magnitude of total ambulatory care were statistically significant by sex, age, education, occupation, and family size. 3) Unmet needs were classified as 56.0% in chronic illnesses and 19.6% in acute illnesses; and differences in unmet needs were statistically significant by sex, age, education, occupation, income, and family size. 4) Statistically significant determinants in medical care utilization included the frequency of acute illness and chronic illness, and income in total utilization; the frequency of chronic illness and acute illness, and medical care insurance in physician visits. 5) According to the results of the path analysis, need factors had the greatest effect on utilization, and predisposing factors had more indirect effects through enabling or need factors than direct effects.
Summary

JPMPH : Journal of Preventive Medicine and Public Health