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Jong Hyock Park 10 Articles
Association Between Socioeconomic Status and All-Cause Mortality After Breast Cancer Surgery: Nationwide Retrospective Cohort Study.
Mi Jin Park, Woojin Chung, Sunmi Lee, Jong Hyock Park, Hoo Sun Chang
J Prev Med Public Health. 2010;43(4):330-340.
DOI: https://doi.org/10.3961/jpmph.2010.43.4.330
  • 5,457 View
  • 67 Download
  • 8 Crossref
AbstractAbstract PDF
OBJECTIVES
This study aims to evaluate and explain the socioeconomic inequalities of all-cause mortality after breast cancer surgery in South Korea. METHODS: This population based study included all 8868 females who underwent radical mastectomy for breast cancer between January 2002 and June 2003. Follow-up for mortality continued from January 2002 to June 2006. The patients were divided into 4 socioeconomic classes according to their socioeconomic status as defined by the National Health Insurance contribution rate. The relationship between socioeconomic status and all-cause mortality after breast cancer surgery was assessed using the Cox proportional hazards model with adjusting for age, the Charlson's index score, emergency hospitalization, the type of hospital and the hospital ownership. RESULTS: Those in the lowest socioeconomic status group had a significantly higher hazard ratio of 2.09 (95% CI =1.50 - 2.91) compared with those in the highest socioeconomic group after controlling for all the identifiable confounding variables. For all-cause mortality after radical mastectomy, all the other income groups showed significantly higher 3-year mortality rates than did the highest income group. CONCLUSIONS: The socioeconomic status of breast cancer patients should be considered as an independent prognostic factor that affects all-cause mortality after radical mastectomy, and this is possibly due to a delayed diagnosis, limited access or minimal treatment leading to higher mortality. This study may provide tangible support to intensify surveillance and treatment for breast cancer among low socioeconomic class women.
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  • Higher complication rates after management of lower extremity fractures in lower socioeconomic classes: Are risk adjustment models necessary?
    Jeffrey M Henstenburg, Alexander M Lieber, Anthony J Boniello, Yehuda E Kerbel, Mitesh Shah
    Trauma.2022; 24(2): 131.     CrossRef
  • Income Disparity in Breast Cancer Incidence and Stage at Presentation: A National Population Study of South Korea
    Seung-Ah Choe, Minji Roh, Hye Ri Kim, Soohyeon Lee, Myung Ki, Domyung Paek, Mia Son
    Journal of Breast Cancer.2022; 25(5): 415.     CrossRef
  • Pain-related Prescribing Patterns and Associated Factor in Breast Cancer Patients
    Jin Lee, Ie Byung Park, Hwa Jeong Seo
    Korean Journal of Clinical Pharmacy.2021; 31(2): 115.     CrossRef
  • Higher breast cancer prevalence associated with higher socioeconomic status in the South Korean population; Has it resulted from overdiagnosis?
    Seong-Woo Choi, So-Yeon Ryu, Mi-ah Han, Jong Park, Antonio Palazón-Bru
    PLOS ONE.2018; 13(7): e0200484.     CrossRef
  • Barriers to Cancer Care, Perceived Social Support, and Patient Navigation Services for Korean Breast Cancer Patients
    Jung-won Lim
    Social Work in Health Care.2015; 54(1): 47.     CrossRef
  • Equity in health care: current situation in South Korea
    Hong-Jun Cho
    Journal of the Korean Medical Association.2013; 56(3): 184.     CrossRef
  • Cancer Control and the Communication Innovation in South Korea: Implications for Cancer Disparities
    Minsoo Jung
    Asian Pacific Journal of Cancer Prevention.2013; 14(6): 3411.     CrossRef
  • Performance of Papanicolaou Testing and Detection of Cervical Carcinoma In Situ in Participants of Organized Cervical Cancer Screening in South Korea
    Mi Ah Han, Kui Son Choi, Hoo-Yeon Lee, Jae Kwan Jun, Kyu Won Jung, Sokbom Kang, Eun-Cheol Park, Konradin Metze
    PLoS ONE.2012; 7(4): e35469.     CrossRef
Analysis of the Factors Related to the Needs of Patients with Cancer.
Jung A Lee, Sun Hee Lee, Jong Hyock Park, Jae Hyun Park, Sung Gyeong Kim, Ju Hyun Seo
J Prev Med Public Health. 2010;43(3):222-234.
DOI: https://doi.org/10.3961/jpmph.2010.43.3.222
  • 5,360 View
  • 93 Download
  • 9 Crossref
AbstractAbstract PDF
OBJECTIVES
Limited research has investigated the specific needs of patients with cancer. This study was performed to explore patients needs and the related factors. METHODS: The data were collected by 1 National Cancer Center and 9 regional cancer centers in Korea. An interview survey was performed with using a structured questionnaire for the subjects(2661 patients who gave written informed consent to particiate) survey 4 months after diagnosis and review of medical records. Data were analyzed using t-test, ANOVA and multiple regression analysis. RESULTS: When comparing the relating factors related with patient needs to the sociodemographic characteristics, the female group showed a higher level of recognition for physical symptoms, social support needs. The younger group showed a significantly higher level of recognition for health care staff, psychological problems, information and education, social support, hospital services needs. In addition, the higher educated group showed a higher level of recognition for health care staff, physical symptoms, social support needs. The higher income and office workers group showed a higher level of recognition for hospital services needs. When comparing the relating factors related with patient needs to the cancer, the breast cancer group showed a higher level of recognition for all needs excluding physical symptoms, accessibility and financial support needs. The combined radiotherapy with surgery and chemotherapy group showed a higher level of recognition for psychological problems, information and education, social support needs. CONCLUSIONS: This study showed that needs on patient with cancer was significantly influenced by female, higher educagion, lower income, having religion, office worker, liver cancer, breast cancer, colon cancer, chemotherapy, and combined therapy.
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  • The Effect of Group Education Reflecting Unmet Needs on Knowledge of Chemotherapy for Patients and Their Families Undergoing Chemotherapy: A One Group Pre-Post Design
    Seyoung Lee, Hoyoung Kim, Nayeon Kim, Misun Yi, Ayoung Lee, Seonmi Cho, Minsun Nam, Juhee Cho
    Asian Oncology Nursing.2024; 24(1): 42.     CrossRef
  • A bibliometric analysis of publication of funded studies in nursing research from Web of Science, 2008–2018
    Ruifang Zhu, Mengyue Liu, Yanbing Su, Xin Meng, Shifan Han, Zhiguang Duan
    Journal of Advanced Nursing.2021; 77(1): 176.     CrossRef
  • Unmet Needs and Sexual Distress of Gynecological Cancer Patients according to the Period after Initial Treatment
    Yeon Hee Bae, Jeong Sook Park
    Asian Oncology Nursing.2021; 21(4): 221.     CrossRef
  • Factors influencing supportive care needs of multiple myeloma patients treated with chemotherapy
    Yoo-Rin Cho, Yang-Sook Yoo
    Supportive Care in Cancer.2020; 28(4): 1783.     CrossRef
  • Effectiveness of comprehensive traditional Korean Medicine treatment on quality of life, anorexia and cachexia of cancer patients: Retrospective chart review
    Wonju Han, Eunji Lee, Gajin Han, Sang-hoon Yoon, Gajin Han, Jungtae Leem
    Journal of Korean Medicine.2019; 40(2): 119.     CrossRef
  • The Effects of a Standardized Preoperative Education Program on Stomach Cancer Patients undergoing Gastrectomy
    Min Ah Yun, So Sun Kim, SangHee Kim, Sung Hoon Noh
    Asian Oncology Nursing.2016; 16(2): 85.     CrossRef
  • Factors that Influence Korean Breast Cancer Patients to Undergo Cancer Rehabilitation Therapy
    Hui-jeong Park, Kyunghee Kim, Ji-su Kim
    Asian Oncology Nursing.2015; 15(2): 106.     CrossRef
  • The Association Between Perceived Social Support and Continued Smoking in Cancer Survivors
    H.-K. Yang, D.-W. Shin, J.-H. Park, S.-Y. Kim, C.-S. Eom, S. Kam, J.-H. Choi, B.-L. Cho, H.-G. Seo
    Japanese Journal of Clinical Oncology.2013; 43(1): 45.     CrossRef
  • Psychosocial needs of cancer patients and related factors: a multi‐center, cross‐sectional study in Korea
    Kyung‐Hyun Choi, Jae‐Hyun Park, Jong‐Hyock Park, Joo‐Sung Park
    Psycho-Oncology.2013; 22(5): 1073.     CrossRef
Costs of Initial Cancer Care and its Affecting Factors.
So Young Kim, Sung Gyeong Kim, Jong Hyock Park, Eun Cheol Park
J Prev Med Public Health. 2009;42(4):243-250.
DOI: https://doi.org/10.3961/jpmph.2009.42.4.243
  • 5,507 View
  • 97 Download
  • 10 Crossref
AbstractAbstract PDF
OBJECTIVES
The purposes of this study is to estimate the cost of cancer care after its diagnosis and to identify factors that can influence the cost of cancer care. METHODS: The study subjects were patients with an initial diagnosis one of four selected tumors and had their first two-years of cancer care at a national cancer center. The data were obtained from medical records and patient surveys. We classified cancer care costs into medical and nonmedical costs, and each cost was analyzed for burden type, medical service, and cancer stage according to cancer types. Factors affecting cancer care costs for the initial phase included demographic variables, socioeconomic status and clinical variables. RESULTS: Cancer care costs for the initial year following diagnosis were higher than the costs for the following successive year after diagnosis. Lung cancer (25,648,000 won) had higher costs than the other three cancer types. Of the total costs, patent burden was more than 50% and medical costs accounted for more than 60%. Inpatient costs accounted for more than 60% of the medical costs for stomach and liver cancer in the initial phase. Care for late-stage cancer was more expensive than care for early-stage cancer. Nonmedical costs were estimated to be between 4,500,000 to 6,000,000 won with expenses for the caregiver being the highest. The factors affecting cancer care costs were treatment type and cancer stage. CONCLUSIONS: The cancer care costs after diagnosis are substantial and vary by cancer site, cancer stage and treatment type. It is useful for policy makers and researchers to identify tumor-specific medical and nonmedical costs. The effort to reduce cancer costs and early detection for cancer can reduce the burden to society and improve quality of life for the cancer patients.
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  • Projecting Lifetime Health Outcomes and Costs Associated with the Ambient Fine Particulate Matter Exposure among Adult Women in Korea
    Gyeyoung Choi, Yujeong Kim, Gyeongseon Shin, SeungJin Bae
    International Journal of Environmental Research and Public Health.2022; 19(5): 2494.     CrossRef
  • Expenditure and Financial Burden for Stomach Cancer Diagnosis and Treatment in China: A Multicenter Study
    Kai Zhang, Jian Yin, Huiyao Huang, Le Wang, Lanwei Guo, Jufang Shi, Min Dai
    Frontiers in Public Health.2020;[Epub]     CrossRef
  • Early Detection is Important to Reduce the Economic Burden of Gastric Cancer
    Jie-Hyun Kim, Sung Soo Kim, Jeong Hoon Lee, Da Hyun Jung, Dae Young Cheung, Woo-Chul Chung, Soo-Heon Park
    Journal of Gastric Cancer.2018; 18(1): 82.     CrossRef
  • Supporting Low-income Cancer Patients: Recommendations for the Public Financial Aid Program in the Republic of Korea
    Hye Sook Min, Hyung Kook Yang, Keeho Park
    Cancer Research and Treatment.2018; 50(4): 1074.     CrossRef
  • Modeling lifetime costs and health outcomes attributable to secondhand smoke exposure at home among Korean adult women
    Jiyae Lee, Ah Ram Han, Dalwoong Choi, Kyung-Min Lim, SeungJin Bae
    BMJ Open.2017; 7(5): e013292.     CrossRef
  • The Relief Effect of Copayment Decreasing Policy on Unmet Needs in Targeted Diseases
    Jae-Woo Choi, Jae-Hyun Kim, Eun-Cheol Park
    Health Policy and Management.2014; 24(1): 24.     CrossRef
  • Changes in Economic Status of Households Associated with Catastrophic Health Expenditures for Cancer in South Korea
    Jae-Woo Choi, Kyoung-Hee Cho, Young Choi, Kyu-Tae Han, Jeoung-A Kwon, Eun-Cheol Park
    Asian Pacific Journal of Cancer Prevention.2014; 15(6): 2713.     CrossRef
  • Medicaid inpatient costs and nested structural analysis using a hierarchical linear modeling (HLM) approach
    Keon-Hyung Lee, Sang-Chul Park, Jungwon Park, Seunghoo Lim
    Health Services and Outcomes Research Methodology.2013; 13(2-4): 157.     CrossRef
  • Costs During the First Five Years Following Cancer Diagnosis in Korea
    Ji-Yeon Shin, So Young Kim, Kun-Sei Lee, Sang-Il Lee, Young Ko, Young-Soon Choi, Hong Gwan Seo, Joo-Hyuk Lee, Jong-Hyock Park
    Asian Pacific Journal of Cancer Prevention.2012; 13(8): 3767.     CrossRef
  • Cost‐effectiveness of bevacizumab‐based therapy versus cisplatin plus pemetrexed for the first‐line treatment of advanced non‐squamous NSCLC in Korea and Taiwan
    Myung‐Ju AHN, Chun‐Ming TSAI, Te‐Chun HSIA, Elaine WRIGHT, John Wen‐Cheng CHANG, Heung Tae KIM, Joo‐Hang KIM, Jin Hyoung KANG, Sang‐We KIM, Eun‐Jin BAE, Mijeong KANG, Johanna LISTER, Stefan WALZER
    Asia-Pacific Journal of Clinical Oncology.2011; 7(s2): 22.     CrossRef
Economic Burden of Cancer in South Korea for the Year 2005.
Jinhee Kim, Myung Il Hahm, Eun Cheol Park, Jae Hyun Park, Jong Hyock Park, Sung Eun Kim, Sung Gyeong Kim
J Prev Med Public Health. 2009;42(3):190-198.
DOI: https://doi.org/10.3961/jpmph.2009.42.3.190
  • 6,616 View
  • 142 Download
  • 44 Crossref
AbstractAbstract PDF
OBJECTIVES
The objective of this study is to estimate the economic costs of cancer on society. METHODS: We estimated the economic burden of people with cancer in South Korea. To perform the analysis, we reviewed the records of people who were cancer patients and those who were newly diagnosed with cancer. The data was compiled from the National Health Insurance Corporation, which included the insurance claims database, a list of cancer patients, a database that records the cancer rates, the Korea Central Cancer Registry Center's cancer patient registry database and the Korea National Statistical Office's causes of death database. We classified the costs as related to cancer into direct costs and indirect costs, and we estimated each cost. Direct costs included both medical and non-medical care expenses and the indirect costs consisted of morbidity, mortality and the caregiver's time costs. RESULTS: The total economic costs of cancer in South Korea stood at 14.1 trillion won in 2005. The largest amount of the cost 7.4 trillion won, was the mortality costs. Following this were the morbidity costs (3.2 trillion won), the medical care costs (2.2 trillion won), the non-medical care costs (1.1 trillion won) and the costs related to the caregiver's time (100 billion won). As a result, the economic cost of cancer to South Korea is estimated to be between 11.6 trillion won to 14.1 trillion won for the year 2005. CONCLUSIONS: We need to reduce the cancer burden through encouraging people to undergo early screening for cancer and curing it in the early stage of cancer, as well as implementing policies to actively prevent cancer.
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  • Regional Health Disparities between Mortality Rates in Three Leading Causes of Death : A Comparative Study of Spatial Dependence in Local Death Rate between Cancer, Heart Disease, and Pneumonia
    Hee-Jung Jun, SeungYeoup Kang
    Journal of Korea Planning Association.2023; 58(2): 38.     CrossRef
  • Prevalence and socioeconomic burden of diabetes mellitus in South Korean adults: a population-based study using administrative data
    Sung-Hee Oh, Hyemin Ku, Kang Seo Park
    BMC Public Health.2021;[Epub]     CrossRef
  • Analysis of Medical Use and Treatment Costs of Hepatocellular Carcinoma Patients Using National Patient Sample Data
    Byeong-Chan Oh, Jeong-Yeon Cho, Sun-Hong Kwon, Eui-Kyung Lee, Hye-Lin Kim
    Korean Journal of Clinical Pharmacy.2021; 31(2): 153.     CrossRef
  • Sex Difference in the Socioeconomic Burden of Osteoporosis among South Koreans
    Eun-Whan Lee, Jin Young Nam
    Healthcare.2021; 9(10): 1304.     CrossRef
  • Socioeconomic Burden of Disease Due to Asthma in South Korea
    Eun-Whan Lee, Hee-Sun Kim, Wook Kim, Jin-Young Nam, Jae-Hyun Park
    Asia Pacific Journal of Public Health.2020; 32(4): 188.     CrossRef
  • The Economic Burden of Brain Disability in Korea, 2008-2011
    Hyun-Jin Kim, Seung Hee Ho, Sol Lee, In-Hwan Oh, Ju Hee Kim, Eun Joo Kim, Seong Jae Lee
    INQUIRY: The Journal of Health Care Organization, Provision, and Financing.2020; 57: 004695802093639.     CrossRef
  • Socioeconomic Burden of Cancer in Korea from 2011 to 2015
    Young Ae Kim, Ye-Rin Lee, Jeongjoo Park, In-Hwan Oh, Hoseob Kim, Seok-Jun Yoon, Keeho Park
    Cancer Research and Treatment.2020; 52(3): 896.     CrossRef
  • Measuring the Economic Burden of Disease and Injury in Korea, 2015
    Ye-Rin Lee, Bogeum Cho, Min-Woo Jo, Minsu Ock, Donghoon Lee, Doungkyu Lee, Moon Jung Kim, In-Hwan Oh
    Journal of Korean Medical Science.2019;[Epub]     CrossRef
  • The economic burden of cancer attributable to obesity in Korea: A population‐based cohort study
    Joo Eun Lee, Chung Mo Nam, Sang Gyu Lee, Sohee Park, Tae Hyun Kim, Eun‐Cheol Park
    European Journal of Cancer Care.2019;[Epub]     CrossRef
  • Association of Bedtime with both Suicidal Ideation and Suicide Planning among Korean Adolescents
    Wonjeong Jeong, Yun Kyung Kim, Hyeon Ji Lee, Jieun Jang, Selin Kim, Eun-Cheol Park, Sung-In Jang
    International Journal of Environmental Research and Public Health.2019; 16(20): 3817.     CrossRef
  • Cancer Survivorship in Primary Care
    Jihun Kang, Eun Ju Park, Jungkwon Lee
    Korean Journal of Family Medicine.2019; 40(6): 353.     CrossRef
  • The economic burden of kidney disorders in Korea
    Ju Hee Kim, Seung Hee Ho, Hyun-Jin Kim, Sol Lee
    Journal of Medical Economics.2018; 21(3): 262.     CrossRef
  • How great is current curative expenditure and catastrophic health expenditure among patients with cancer in China? A research based on “System of Health Account 2011”
    Ang Zheng, Wenjuan Duan, Lin Zhang, Xintong Bao, Xiaoyun Mao, Zhuojun Luo, Feng Jin
    Cancer Medicine.2018; 7(8): 4036.     CrossRef
  • The Burden of Cancer in Korea during 2012: Findings from a Prevalence-Based Approach
    Young-hoon Gong, Seok-Jun Yoon, Min-Woo Jo, Arim Kim, Young Ae Kim, Jihyun Yoon, Hyeyoung Seo, Dongwoo Kim
    Journal of Korean Medical Science.2016; 31(Suppl 2): S168.     CrossRef
  • Factors Influencing the of Middle-Aged Men the NCSP(National Cancer Screening Program)
    Geum-Ja Park, Kyoung-Min Lim, Sook-Nam Kim
    The Korean Journal of Health Service Management.2016; 10(3): 51.     CrossRef
  • Total costs and clinical outcome of hematopoietic stem cell transplantation in adults with leukemia: comparison between reduced‐intensity and myeloablative conditioning
    Koung Jin Suh, Inho Kim, Jin Lim, Hyerim Ha, Seongyeol Park, Youngil Koh, Sung‐Soo Yoon, Seonyang Park
    Clinical Transplantation.2015; 29(2): 124.     CrossRef
  • The Epidemiology and Economic Burden ofClostridium difficileInfection in Korea
    Hyung-Yun Choi, So-Youn Park, Young-Ae Kim, Tai-Young Yoon, Joong-Myung Choi, Bong-Keun Choe, So-Hee Ahn, Seok-Jun Yoon, Ye-Rin Lee, In-Hwan Oh
    BioMed Research International.2015; 2015: 1.     CrossRef
  • The Economic Burden of Cancer in Korea in 2009
    So Young Kim, Jong-Hyock Park, Kyoung Hee Kang, Inuk Hwang, Hyung Kook Yang, Young-Joo Won, Hong-Gwan Seo, Dukhyoung Lee, Seok-Jun Yoon
    Asian Pacific Journal of Cancer Prevention.2015; 16(3): 1295.     CrossRef
  • The Economic Burden of Cancers Attributable to Metabolic Syndrome in Korea
    Dongwoo Kim, Seok-Jun Yoon, Young-Hoon Gong, Young Ae Kim, Hye-Young Seo, Jihyun Yoon, A-Rim Kim
    Journal of Preventive Medicine and Public Health.2015; 48(4): 180.     CrossRef
  • The Economic Burden of Breast Cancer in Korea from 2007-2010
    Young Ae Kim, In-Hwan Oh, Seok-Jun Yoon, Hyun-Jin Kim, Hye-Young Seo, Eun-Jung Kim, Yo Han Lee, Jae Hun Jung
    Cancer Research and Treatment.2015; 47(4): 583.     CrossRef
  • Quality of Life among End-stage Renal Disease Treatments and Economic Evaluation of Renal Transplantation and Hemodialysis Treatments
    Kyung-Ock Jeon, Sun-Young Son, Myung-Il Hahm, Soon-Il Kim
    Korean Journal of Transplantation.2015; 29(4): 200.     CrossRef
  • Economic Burden of Colorectal Cancer in Korea
    Ju-Young Byun, Seok-Jun Yoon, In-Hwan Oh, Young Ae Kim, Hye-Young Seo, Yo-Han Lee
    Journal of Preventive Medicine and Public Health.2014; 47(2): 84.     CrossRef
  • Attributable fraction of alcohol consumption on cancer using population-based nationwide cancer incidence and mortality data in the Republic of Korea
    Sohee Park, Hai-Rim Shin, Boram Lee, Aesun Shin, Kyu-Won Jung, Duk-Hee Lee, Sun Ha Jee, Sung-Il Cho, Sue Kyung Park, Mathieu Boniol, Paolo Boffetta, Elisabete Weiderpass
    BMC Cancer.2014;[Epub]     CrossRef
  • Setting a Health Policy Research Agenda for Controlling Cancer Burden in Korea
    Sung-In Jang, Kyoung-Hee Cho, Sun Jung Kim, Kwang-Sig Lee, Eun-Cheol Park
    Cancer Research and Treatment.2014; 47(2): 149.     CrossRef
  • The costs of hepatitis A infections in South Korea
    Kyohyun Kim, Baek-Geun Jeong, Moran Ki, Mira Park, Jin Kyung Park, Bo Youl Choi, Weon-Seob Yoo
    Epidemiology and Health.2014; 36: e2014011.     CrossRef
  • Economic Burden of Cancer in Korea during 2000-2010
    Kwang-Sig Lee, Hoo-Sun Chang, Sun-Mi Lee, Eun-Cheol Park
    Cancer Research and Treatment.2014; 47(3): 387.     CrossRef
  • Review of Tumor Dormancy Therapy Using Traditional Oriental Herbal Medicine
    Jong-Ho Lee, Fan-Pei Koung, Chong-Kwan Cho, Yeon-Weol Lee, Hwa-Seung Yoo
    Journal of Pharmacopuncture.2013; 16(1): 12.     CrossRef
  • Management of Cancer Survivors in Clinical and Public Health Perspectives: Current Status and Future Challenges in Korea
    Dong Wook Shin, BeLong Cho, So Young Kim, Je Hyuck Jung, Jong Hyock Park
    Journal of Korean Medical Science.2013; 28(5): 651.     CrossRef
  • Disability Weights for Cancers in Korea
    Kyu Sik Choi, Jae Hyun Park, Kwang Sig Lee
    Journal of Korean Medical Science.2013; 28(6): 808.     CrossRef
  • Relationship Between Current Sleep Duration and Past Suicidal Ideation or Attempt Among Korean Adolescents
    Sung-In Jang, Kwang-Sig Lee, Eun-Cheol Park
    Journal of Preventive Medicine and Public Health.2013; 46(6): 329.     CrossRef
  • Union for International Cancer Control International Session: Healthcare Economics: The significance of the UN summit non‐communicable diseases political declaration in Asia
    Hideyuki Akaza, Norie Kawahara, Tohru Masui, Kunihiko Takeyama, Masafumi Nogimori, Jae Kyung Roh
    Cancer Science.2013; 104(6): 773.     CrossRef
  • A Single Measure of Cancer Burden in Korea from 1999 to 2010
    Kyoung-Hee Cho, Sohee Park, Kwang-Sig Lee, Sung-In Jang, Ki-Bong Yoo, Jae-Hyun Kim, Eun-Cheol Park
    Asian Pacific Journal of Cancer Prevention.2013; 14(9): 5249.     CrossRef
  • The Socioeconomic Burden of Coronary Heart Disease in Korea
    Hoo-Sun Chang, Han-Joong Kim, Chung-Mo Nam, Seung-Ji Lim, Young-Hwa Jang, Sera Kim, Hye-Young Kang
    Journal of Preventive Medicine and Public Health.2012; 45(5): 291.     CrossRef
  • Evaluation of the willingness‐to‐pay for cancer treatment in Korean metastatic breast cancer patients: A multicenter, cross‐sectional study
    Do‐Youn OH, Bruce CRAWFORD, Sung‐Bae KIM, Hyun‐Cheol CHUNG, Jeffrey MCDONALD, Sang Yoon LEE, Su‐Kyoung KO, Jungsil RO
    Asia-Pacific Journal of Clinical Oncology.2012; 8(3): 282.     CrossRef
  • The economic burden of stroke in 2010 in Korea
    Hyun-Jin Kim, Young-Ae Kim, Hye-Young Seo, Eun-Jung Kim, Seok-Jun Yoon, In-Hwan Oh
    Journal of the Korean Medical Association.2012; 55(12): 1226.     CrossRef
  • The Economic Burden of Inflammatory Heart Disease in Korea
    Seul-Ki Ko, Seok-Jun Yoon, In-Hwan Oh, Hye-Young Seo, Eun-Jung Kim
    Korean Circulation Journal.2011; 41(12): 712.     CrossRef
  • Needs Assessment for the Beneficiaries of Home-Based Cancer Patients Management Project
    Ju-Hyung Lee, Jung-Im Park, Ji-Hoon Kang, Jung-Ho Youm, Dai-Ha Koh, Keun-Sang Kwon
    Journal of agricultural medicine and community health.2011; 36(4): 238.     CrossRef
  • Socioeconomic costs of liver disease in Korea
    Sunmi Lee, Woojin Chung, Kyung-Rae Hyun
    The Korean Journal of Hepatology.2011; 17(4): 274.     CrossRef
  • How Much Amount of Socioeconomic Loss Is Caused by Digestive Diseases?
    Kyung Sik Park
    The Korean Journal of Gastroenterology.2011; 58(6): 297.     CrossRef
  • Comprehensive needs assessment tool in cancer (CNAT): the development and validation
    Eun-Jung Shim, kyung-Sook Lee, Jong-Hyock Park, Jae-Hyun Park
    Supportive Care in Cancer.2011; 19(12): 1957.     CrossRef
  • Factors Affecting Beneficiary Satisfaction on Financial Aid Program for Cancer Patients in Korea
    Ju-Ho Sim, Jong-Hyock Park, Jung-A Lee, So-Young Kim, Bo-Ram Park, Eun-Cheol Park
    Korean Journal of Health Policy and Administration.2011; 21(1): 61.     CrossRef
  • A Renal Transplantation and Hemodialysis Cost-Utility Analysis in Patients with End-Stage Renal Disease
    Soon-Il Kim, Yu-Seun Kim, Myoung-Soo Kim, Eun-Cheol Park, Kyung-Ock Jeon, Sun-young Son, Myung-Il Hahm, Hoo-Yeon Lee
    Korean Journal of Transplantation.2010; 24(3): 173.     CrossRef
  • Cancer patients' need for financial assistance and its related factors
    Youn-Gu Kim, Jae-Hyun Park, Jong-Hyock Park
    Korean Journal of Health Policy and Administration.2010; 20(4): 58.     CrossRef
  • Estimating Medical Expenditure Associated with Osteoporotic Hip Fracture in Elderly Korean Women Based on the National Health Insurance Claims Database 2002–2004
    Hye-Young Kang, Sung-Eun Park, Dae Ryong Kang, Ji Yoon Kim, Young Hwa Jang, Won-Jung Choi, Seong-Hwan Moon, Kyu-Hyun Yang, Jin-Young Park, Soon-Yong Kwon
    Value in Health.2009; 12: S93.     CrossRef
Factors Affecting Comsumer's Usage of Health Information on the Internet.
Jong Hyock Park, Jin Seok Lee, Hyejung Jang, Yoon Kim
J Prev Med Public Health. 2008;41(4):241-248.
DOI: https://doi.org/10.3961/jpmph.2008.41.4.241
  • 4,962 View
  • 56 Download
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AbstractAbstract PDF
OBJECTIVES
The purpose of the study was to identify a gap between consumer characteristics and utilization of health information on the Internet. METHODS: A telephone survey of nationally representative samples was conducted using structured questionnaires, and 1,000 of the 1,189 responses obtained were included in our analysis. The following variables were included in the analysis as potential predictors of health information use on the Internet: predisposing factors such as gender, age, and education status; enabling factors such as region and monthly household income; consumer need for health information; and attitude to health. Multiple logistic regression analysis was used to evaluate the association between utilization rate and the potential predictors. RESULTS: Thirty-nine percent of consumers had obtained health information on the Internet over a one-year period. The utilization rates were higher for consumers who were young, educated, worked in the office setting, had higher incomes, wanted health information, and were able to use the Internet. The utilization rate was 5.35 times higher in the younger group (20-30 years) than in the elderly group (95% CI=2.21-12.97); 2.21 times higher for office workers than for manual workers (95% CI=1.16-4.20); 3.61 times higher for college graduates than for middle school graduates and below (95% CI=1.07-11.59); 1.99 times higher for people with monthly household incomes over 3,000,000 won than for those with monthly household incomes below 1,500,000 won (95% CI=1.01-3.92). CONCLUSIONS: There needs to be a paradigm shift, with consideration of not only Internet accessibility in the digital age, but also consumer ability and attitudes toward utilization of health information.
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  • Medical Professionals' Review of YouTube Videos Pertaining to Exercises for the Constipation Relief
    Tae Hee Lee, Seong-Eun Kim, Kyung Sik Park, Jeong Eun Shin, Seon-Young Park, Han Seung Ryu, Jung-Wook Kim, Yoo Jin Lee, Young Sin Cho, Suyeon Park
    The Korean Journal of Gastroenterology.2018; 72(6): 295.     CrossRef
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    Ji-Young An, Haeran Jang, Jinkyung Paik
    Journal of Korea Multimedia Society.2014; 17(8): 995.     CrossRef
Physician Factors Associated with the Blood Pressure Control among Hypertensive Patients.
So Young Kim, In Sook Cho, Jae Ho Lee, Ji Hyun Kim, Eun Jung Lee, Jong Hyock Park, Jin Seok Lee, Yoon Kim
J Prev Med Public Health. 2007;40(6):487-494.
DOI: https://doi.org/10.3961/jpmph.2007.40.6.487
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OBJECTIVES
Little is known about the physician-related factors that are associated with the management of hypertension. The purpose of this study was to determine the physician-related factors associated with blood pressure control in hypertensive patients. METHODS: We surveyed 154 physicians at 117 public health (subhealth) centers in Gyeonggi-do. Forty-one physicians completed the survey (response rates: 26.6%) and 31 physicians were finally included as the study subjects. Using the information obtained from the selfreported survey, we measured the physician-related factors associated with hypertension control, including their perception of hypertension, prescription patterns (combination prescription rates, specific antihypertensives prescription rates among patients with diabetes mellitus), and sociodemographic factors. We then collected data on blood pressure and medication use in patients seen by these physicians from the health center's information system. We compared the physicians' perceived hypertension control rates with the actual rates, and then evaluated the rate of high overestimation (overestimation by more than 25% of the median degree of hypertension control rate overestimation) among the physicians. The physicians' antihypertensive prescription patterns were also evaluated. Multiple logistic regression analysis was used to evaluate the independent association between hypertension control and physicianrelated factors. RESULTS: The physicians tended to overestimate the proportion of their patients with controlled blood pressure (79.5% perceived vs. 57.8% actual). The percentage of physicians with high overestimation was 35.5% (11 physicians). The physicians with lower control rates were more likely to highly overestimate their patients' control rates. Physicians with below-median actual control rates tended to prescribe fewer combination treatments for patients with uncontrolled blood pressure and angiotensinconverting enzyme inhibitors or fewer angiotensin receptor blockers for patients with diabetes mellitus. The rate of high overestimation by physicians was 1.31 times higher in patients with uncontrolled blood pressure than in patients with other conditions (OR=1.31, 95% CI: 1.17-1.48). CONCLUSIONS: Physicians have a tendency to overestimate the rates of hypertension control in their patients. Because physicians have a direct role in treatment outcomes, physicians' overestimation about hypertension management contributes to inadequate blood pressure control. Thus, interventions for improving physician' awareness regarding the management of patients with hypertension are needed.
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    Eboni G. Price-Haywood, Sarah Amering, Qingyang Luo, John J. Lefante
    Population Health Management.2017; 20(2): 123.     CrossRef
  • Psychometric Properties of a Short Self-Reported Measure of Medication Adherence Among Patients With Hypertension Treated in a Busy Clinical Setting in Korea
    Jeung-Hee Kim, Weon-Young Lee, Yeon-Pyo Hong, Wang-Seong Ryu, Kwang Je Lee, Wang-Soo Lee, Donald E. Morisky
    Journal of Epidemiology.2014; 24(2): 132.     CrossRef
  • Health Incentive Program and Hypertensive Patients' Blood Pressure Control
    Kyunghee Kang
    Journal of the Korea Academia-Industrial cooperation Society.2013; 14(9): 4388.     CrossRef
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    Ülkü Yapucu Güneş
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    L. T. C. van Hulst, M. C. W. Creemers, J. Fransen, L. C. Li, R. Grol, M. E. J. L. Hulscher, P. L. C. M. van Riel
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  • The Effect of Re-building of Public Health Facilities on the Hypertension Control in the Rural Area
    Sung-A Chun, Baeg-Ju Na, Chul-Woung Kim, Moo-Sik Lee
    Journal of agricultural medicine and community health.2008; 33(1): 37.     CrossRef
Antihypertensive Drug Medication Adherence of People with Disabilities and its Affecting Factors in Korea.
Jong Hyock Park, Youngsoo Shin, Sang Yi Lee, Jae Hyun Park
J Prev Med Public Health. 2007;40(3):249-258.
DOI: https://doi.org/10.3961/jpmph.2007.40.3.249
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AbstractAbstract PDF
OBJECTIVES
The aims of this study were to estimate the antihypertensive medication adherence in people with a disability and a history of taking antihypertensive medication, and to identify the factors affecting medication adherence. METHODS: The National Health Insurance claims data were linked with the National Disability Registry. People with a disability, who received a prescription of antihypertensives, were identified from a total of 85,098 cases. Cumulative medication adherence (CMA) was used as an indicator of medication adherence. A CMA > 80% was defined as appropriate medication adherence. Multiple logistic regression analysis was used to identify the factors affecting medication adherence. RESULTS: The average CMA in a total of 85,098 patients was 79.5%. The appropriate adherence (CMA > or =80%) rate was 54.5% and 20.5% of patients had a CMA < 50%. Multiple logistic regression analysis revealed that the probability of appropriate adherence decreased with decreasing number of prescription days per visit, increasing number of providers, the patients' residential area moving from urban to rural areas, and when patients have an internal organ disability, auditory impairment, mobility impairment. CONCLUSIONS: The adherence to antihypertensive medication in people with a disability is influenced by various socio-economic, clinical and regional factors. In particular, the disabled who have locomotive and communication disabilities and internal organ impairments have a higher probability of under-adherence to antihypertensive medication adherence in Korea.
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    Han-Kil Kang, Nak-Jin Sung
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  • Risk Factors and the Usual Source of Care on Non-Adherence to Antihypertensive Drugs in Immigrants with Hypertension


    Hyemin Cho, Sohyun Jeong, Cinoo Kang, Hee-Jin Kang, Suhyun Jang, Sunmee Jang
    Patient Preference and Adherence.2020; Volume 14: 2123.     CrossRef
  • Control of hypertension and diabetes among adults aged over 40 years with or without physical disabilities
    Jung-A Lee, Jong Heon Park
    International Journal on Disability and Human Development.2015;[Epub]     CrossRef
  • Effect of antihypertensive medication adherence on hospitalization for cardiovascular disease and mortality in hypertensive patients
    Sukyoun Shin, Hyunjong Song, Sang-Kwon Oh, Kyung Eob Choi, Ho Kim, Sunmee Jang
    Hypertension Research.2013; 36(11): 1000.     CrossRef
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    Hong-Jun Cho
    Journal of the Korean Medical Association.2013; 56(3): 184.     CrossRef
  • Predictors of Current Smoking among Male Students in a Technical High School: A Prospective Study
    Jong-Yeon Kim, Soon-Woo Park
    Journal of Preventive Medicine and Public Health.2009; 42(1): 59.     CrossRef
  • Antihypertensive Drug Medication Adherence of People with Disabilities and its Affecting Factors in Korea
    Jong-Hyock Park, Youngsoo Shin, Sang Yi Lee, Jae-Hyun Park
    Journal of Preventive Medicine and Public Health.2007; 40(3): 249.     CrossRef
Factors Affecting National Health Insurance Mass Screening Participation in the Disabled.
Jong Hyock Park, Jin Seok Lee, Jin Yong Lee, Ji Young Hong, So Young Kim, Seong Ok Kim, Byong Hee Cho, Yong Ik Kim, Youngsoo Shin, Yoon Kim
J Prev Med Public Health. 2006;39(6):511-519.
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OBJECTIVES
As the disabled have higher prevalence rates and earlier onsets of chronic diseases than the nondisabled, their participation in mass screening is important for the early detection and intervention of chronic diseases. Nevertheless, in Korea, the disabled have lower participation rates in mass screening services than the nondisabled. The purpose of the study was to find determinants for the participation in the National Health Insurance (NHI) mass screening program among the disabled. METHODS: In this study, the NHI mass screening data of 423,076 disabled people, which were identified using the National Disability Registry (2003), were analyzed. Of the factors affecting the participation rates in mass screenings, the following variables were included for the analysis: socioeconomic stati, such as sex, age, category of health insurance program, region and income; disability characteristics, such as disability type, and severity. A multiple logistic regression analysis was used to evaluate the association between the participation rates, disability characteristics variables and demographic variables. RESULTS: The participation rate in mass screening of the disabled was 41.3%, but was lower in females, an age of more than 70 years, self-employed and for those with an average monthly insurance premium over 133,500 Won and in metropolitan regions. The participation rate was 1.31 times lower in females than males (95% CI=1.29-1.33); 3.50 times lower in the elderly (more than 70 years) than the younger (95% CI=3.33-3.67); 1.43 times lower in those who live in metropolitan areas (95% CI=1.40-1.46); 2.59 times lower for those in a health insurance program for the self-employed than for employees (95% CI=2.56-2.63); 1.19 times lower for the higher income (more than 133,500) than the lower income group (4,400-22,000) for the average monthly insurance premium (95% CI=1.15-1.23); 2.04 times lower for those with brain palsy and stroke disabilities than with auditory impairments (95% CI= 1.97-2.11) and 3.27 times for those with severe compared to mild disabilities (95% CI=3.15-3.40). CONCLUSIONS: The disabled with high severity, and locomotive and communication disabilities have lower participation rates in mass screening services in Korea.
Summary
Estimating the Burden of Psychiatric Disorder in Korea.
Jae Hyun Park, Seok Jun Yoon, Hee Young Lee, Hee Sook Cho, Jin Yong Lee, Sang Jun Eun, Jong Hyock Park, Yoon Kim, Yong Ik Kim, Young Soo Shin
J Prev Med Public Health. 2006;39(1):39-45.
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OBJECTIVES
This study estimated the burden of disease especially caused by psychiatric disorders in Korea by using DALY, a composite indicator that was recently developed by the Global Burden of Disease study group. METHODS: First, 11 of the major psychiatric disorders in Korea were selected based on the ICD-10. Second, the burden of disease due to premature death was estimated by using YLLs (years of life lost due to premature death). Third, for the calculation of the YLD (years lived with disability), the following parameters were estimated in the formula: the incidence rate, the prevalence rate and the disability weight of each psychiatric disorder. Last, we estimated the DALY of the psychiatric disorders by adding the YLLs and YLDs. RESULTS: The burden of psychiatric disorder per 100,000 people was attributed mainly to unipolar major depression (1,278 person-years), schizophrenia (638 person-years) and alcohol use disorder (287 person-years). For males, schizophrenia (596 person-years) and alcohol use disorder (491 person-years) caused the highest burden. For females, unipolar major depression (1,749 person-years) and schizophrenia (680 person-years) cause the highest burden. As analyzed by gender and age group, alcohol use disorder causes a higher burden than schizophrenia in men aged 40 years and older. For females, unipolar major depression causes the highest burden in all age groups. CONCLUSIONS: We found that each of the psychiatric disorders that cause the highest burden is different according to gender and age group. This study's results can provide a rational basis to plan a national health policy regarding the burden of disease caused by psychiatric disorders.
Summary
Estimating the Burden of Diseases due to High Alcohol Consumption in Korea.
Jung Kyu Lee, Yong Ik Kim, Seok Jun Yoon, Jin Yong Lee, Heeyoung Lee, Jong Hyock Park, Youngsoo Shin
J Prev Med Public Health. 2005;38(2):175-181.
  • 2,537 View
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AbstractAbstract PDF
OBJECTIVES
This study estimated the burden of disease due to high alcohol consumption using DALY, a composite indicator recently developed by the Global Burden of Disease study group. The results were analyzed by age and sex. METHODS: Firstly, high alcohol consumption-related diseases, and their relative risk (RR), were selected. Secondly, population attributable fractions (PAFs) were computed using formulae, including the relative risk (RR) and prevalence of exposure (Pe). Thirdly, the DALYs of high alcohol consumption-related diseases were estimated. Lastly, the attributable burdens of diseases due to high alcohol consumption wereconcluded as being the sum of the products that multiplied the DALYs of high alcohol consumption-related diseases by their population attributable fraction (PAF). RESULTS: The burden of high alcohol consumption in Korea was 2992.3 person years (PYs) per 100, 000 persons in men, and 1426.6 in women. For men, the high alcohol consumption-induced diseases with the five biggest burdens were liver cirrhosis, hypertensive disease, liver cancer, cerebral infarction and intracerebral hemorrhage. For women, these were cerebral infarction, intracerebral hemorrhage, hypertensive disease, liver cirrhosis and liver cancer. CONCLUSION: This study highlighted the attributable fraction of diseases due to exposure to high alcohol consumption, by quantifying the results of exposure to risk factors. Therefore, it is now possible to assess interventions for risk factors in quantifiable terms in each population. Finally, measuring the risk factor burdens was expected to contribute to priority setting and effective resource allocation in public health policy.
Summary

JPMPH : Journal of Preventive Medicine and Public Health