Skip Navigation
Skip to contents

JPMPH : Journal of Preventive Medicine and Public Health

OPEN ACCESS
SEARCH
Search

Search

Page Path
HOME > Search
15 "Alcohol drinking"
Filter
Filter
Article category
Keywords
Publication year
Authors
Funded articles
Original Articles
Predictors and Prevalence of Alcohol and Cannabis Co-use Among Filipino Adolescents: Evidence From a School-based Student Health Survey
Yusuff Adebayo Adebisi, Don Eliseo Lucero-Prisno III, Jerico B. Ogaya, Victor C. Cañezo Jr., Roland A. Niez, Florante E. Delos Santos, Melchor M. Magramo, Ann Rosanie Yap-Tan, Francis Ann R. Sy, Omar Kasimieh
J Prev Med Public Health. 2024;57(3):288-297.   Published online May 9, 2024
DOI: https://doi.org/10.3961/jpmph.24.052
  • 1,175 View
  • 77 Download
AbstractAbstract AbstractSummary PDF
Objectives
This study explored the prevalence and predictors of alcohol and cannabis co-use among 9263 Filipino adolescents, using data from the 2019 Global School-based Student Health Survey (GSHS).
Methods
We conducted a cross-sectional secondary analysis of the GSHS, targeting adolescents aged 13-17 years and excluding cases with incomplete data on alcohol and cannabis use. Our analysis employed the bivariate chi-square test of independence and multivariable logistic regression using Stata version 18 to identify significant predictors of co-use, with a p-value threshold set at 0.05.
Results
The weighted prevalence of co-users was 4.2% (95% confidence interval [CI], 3.4 to 5.3). Significant predictors included male sex (adjusted odds ratio [aOR], 4.50; 95% CI, 3.31 to 6.10; p<0.001) and being in a lower academic year, specifically grade 7 (aOR, 4.08; 95% CI, 2.39 to 6.99; p<0.001) and grade 8 (aOR, 2.20; 95% CI, 1.30 to 3.72; p=0.003). Poor sleep quality was also a significant predictor (aOR, 1.77; 95% CI, 1.29 to 2.44; p<0.001), as was a history of attempted suicide (aOR, 5.31; 95% CI, 4.00 to 7.06; p<0.001). Physical inactivity was associated with lower odds of co-use (aOR, 0.45; 95% CI, 0.33 to 0.62; p<0.001). Additionally, non-attendance of physical education classes (aOR, 1.48; 95% CI, 1.06 to 2.05; p=0.021), infrequent unapproved parental checks (aOR, 1.37; 95% CI, 1.04 to 1.80; p=0.024), and lower parental awareness of free-time activities (aOR, 0.63; 95% CI, 0.45 to 0.87; p=0.005) were associated with higher odds of co-use. Factors not significantly linked to co-use included age group, being in grade 9, always feeling lonely, having no close friends, being bullied outside school, and whether a parent or guardian understood the adolescent’s worries.
Conclusions
The findings highlight the critical need for comprehensive interventions in the Philippines, addressing not only physical inactivity and parental monitoring but also focusing on sex, academic grade, participation in physical education classes, sleep quality, and suicide attempt history, to effectively reduce alcohol and cannabis co-use among adolescents.
Summary
Key Message
This cross-sectional study examines the prevalence and key predictors of alcohol and cannabis co-use among 9263 Filipino adolescents using data from the 2019 Global School-based Student Health Survey. Significant predictors of co-use include male sex, lower academic grade, poor sleep quality, history of attempted suicide, physical inactivity, non-attendance in physical education classes, infrequent parental checks, and low parental awareness of adolescents' activities, with a weighted co-use prevalence of 4.2%. The study underscores the need for comprehensive interventions addressing these factors to reduce substance co-use among Filipino adolescents.
Age-period-cohort Analysis of Healthy Lifestyle Behaviors Using the National Health and Nutrition Survey in Japan
Tasuku Okui
J Prev Med Public Health. 2020;53(6):409-418.   Published online August 13, 2020
DOI: https://doi.org/10.3961/jpmph.20.159
  • 8,537 View
  • 223 Download
  • 10 Crossref
AbstractAbstract PDF
Objectives
This study conducted an age-period-cohort (APC) analysis of trends in healthy lifestyle behaviors in Japan.
Methods
We used National Health and Nutrition Survey data on salt intake and prevalence of smoking, drinking, and physical activity between 1995 and 2018 in Japan. Age groups were defined from 20 years to 69 years old in 10-year increments. Cohorts were defined for each age group of each year with a 1-year shift, and cohorts born in 1926-1935 (first cohort) until 1989-1998 (last cohort) were examined. We conducted a Bayesian APC analysis, calculating estimated values for each behavior by age group, period, and cohort.
Results
Estimated salt intake decreased from cohorts born in the 1930s to the 1960s, but increased thereafter in both genders, and the magnitude of increase was larger for men. Estimated smoking prevalence increased in the cohorts starting from the 1930s for men and the 1940s for women, and then decreased starting in the cohorts born in the 1970s for both genders. Although estimated drinking prevalence decreased starting in the cohorts born in approximately 1960 for men, for women it increased until the cohorts born in approximately 1970. Estimated physical activity prevalence decreased starting in the cohorts born in the 1940s in both genders, but the magnitude of decrease was larger for women.
Conclusions
Trends in cohort effects differed by gender, which might be related to changes in the social environment for women. Improvements in dietary and exercise habits are required in more recently born cohorts of both genders.
Summary

Citations

Citations to this article as recorded by  
  • Evaluating trends in cigarette and HTP use in Japan and measurement issues in the National Health and Nutrition Survey
    David T Levy, Mona Issabakhsh, Kenneth E Warner, Alex Liber, Rafael Meza, Michael Cummings
    Tobacco Control.2024; : tc-2023-058526.     CrossRef
  • Old story, new twist: reducing salt and increasing potassium intake as a social issue according to the INTERMAP Japan
    Junichi Yatabe, Kazuya Ishida, Midori Sasaki Yatabe
    Hypertension Research.2023; 46(2): 526.     CrossRef
  • Subtype prevalence and baseline visual acuity by age in Japanese patients with neovascular age-related macular degeneration
    Tomoko Sawada, Tsutomu Yasukawa, Hiroko Imaizumi, Hisashi Matsubara, Kazuhiro Kimura, Hiroto Terasaki, Hiroto Ishikawa, Tomoya Murakami, Masaru Takeuchi, Yoshinori Mitamura, Yutaro Mizusawa, Yoshihiro Takamura, Toshinori Murata, Jiro Kogo, Masahito Ohji
    Japanese Journal of Ophthalmology.2023; 67(2): 149.     CrossRef
  • Age, Period, and Cohort Analysis of Smoking Intensity Among Current Smokers in Malaysia, 1996–2015
    Chien Huey Teh, Sanjay Rampal, Kuang Hock Lim, Omar Azahadi, Aris Tahir
    Nicotine and Tobacco Research.2023; 25(7): 1340.     CrossRef
  • Comparison of Secular Trends in Esophageal Cancer Mortality in China and Japan during 1990–2019: An Age-Period-Cohort Analysis
    Ruiqing Li, Jinyi Sun, Tong Wang, Lihong Huang, Shuwen Wang, Panglin Sun, Chuanhua Yu
    International Journal of Environmental Research and Public Health.2022; 19(16): 10302.     CrossRef
  • Estimation of the Effect of Salt-Intake Reduction on Cardiovascular Mortality Decline between 1950 and 2017 in Japan: A Retrospective Simulation Study
    Takehiro Sugiyama, Nayu Ikeda, Kazuko Minowa, Nobuo Nishi
    Nutrients.2022; 14(18): 3747.     CrossRef
  • An analysis of predictors for heavy alcohol drinking using nationally representative survey data in Japan
    Tasuku Okui
    BMC Public Health.2021;[Epub]     CrossRef
  • An Age-Period-Cohort Analysis of Prevalence and Consultation Rate for Dyslipidemia in Japan
    Tasuku Okui
    Asia Pacific Journal of Public Health.2021; 33(1): 46.     CrossRef
  • An Age-Period-Cohort Analysis of Biomarkers of Lifestyle-Related Diseases Using the National Health and Nutrition Survey in Japan, 1973–2018
    Tasuku Okui
    International Journal of Environmental Research and Public Health.2020; 17(21): 8159.     CrossRef
  • Socioeconomic Disparities in All-Cause and Cause-Specific Mortality Rates among Municipalities in Japan, 1999–2019
    Tasuku Okui
    International Journal of Environmental Research and Public Health.2020; 17(24): 9213.     CrossRef
Interactions of Behavioral Changes in Smoking, High-risk Drinking, and Weight Gain in a Population of 7.2 Million in Korea
Yeon-Yong Kim, Hee-Jin Kang, Seongjun Ha, Jong Heon Park
J Prev Med Public Health. 2019;52(4):234-241.   Published online July 3, 2019
DOI: https://doi.org/10.3961/jpmph.18.290
  • 4,702 View
  • 164 Download
  • 1 Crossref
AbstractAbstract AbstractSummary PDF
Objectives
To identify simultaneous behavioral changes in alcohol consumption, smoking, and weight using a fixed-effect model and to characterize their associations with disease status.
Methods
This study included 7 000 529 individuals who participated in the national biennial health-screening program every 2 years from 2009 to 2016 and were aged 40 or more. We reconstructed the data into an individual-level panel dataset with 4 waves. We used a fixed-effect model for smoking, heavy alcohol drinking, and overweight. The independent variables were sex, age, lifestyle factors, insurance contribution, employment status, and disease status.
Results
Becoming a high-risk drinker and losing weight were associated with initiation or resumption of smoking. Initiation or resumption of smoking and weight gain were associated with non-high-risk drinkers becoming high-risk drinkers. Smoking cessation and becoming a high-risk drinker were associated with normal-weight participants becoming overweight. Participants with newly acquired diabetes mellitus, ischemic heart disease, stroke, and cancer tended to stop smoking, discontinue high-risk drinking, and return to a normal weight.
Conclusions
These results obtained using a large-scale population-based database documented interactions among lifestyle factors over time.
Summary
Korean summary
이 분석은 흡연, 음주, 체중의 동시적 변화에 대해 패널분석방법론인 고정효과 모형을 이용하여 분석하였으며, 2009년부터 2016년까지 2년 주기로 4차례 모두 건강검진을 수검받은 720만 명을 대상으로 하였다. 흡연, 음주, 체중의 동시적 변화에 대한 방향성을 탐색하여 생활습관 관련 행태가 독자적이 아닌 유기적으로 변화하는 양상을 확인하였다, 또한 당뇨병, 뇌졸중, 암이 신규로 진단되었을 때 행태 변화가 나타나는 것을 확인하였다.

Citations

Citations to this article as recorded by  
  • Association between Body Mass Index and Risk of Gastric Cancer by Anatomic and Histologic Subtypes in Over 500,000 East and Southeast Asian Cohort Participants
    Jieun Jang, Sangjun Lee, Kwang-Pil Ko, Sarah K. Abe, Md. Shafiur Rahman, Eiko Saito, Md. Rashedul Islam, Norie Sawada, Xiao-Ou Shu, Woon-Puay Koh, Atsuko Sadakane, Ichiro Tsuji, Jeongseon Kim, Isao Oze, Chisato Nagata, Shoichiro Tsugane, Hui Cai, Jian-Min
    Cancer Epidemiology, Biomarkers & Prevention.2022; 31(9): 1727.     CrossRef
Perceptions About Alcohol Harm and Alcohol-control Strategies Among People With High Risk of Alcohol Consumption in Alberta, Canada and Queensland, Australia
Diana C. Sanchez-Ramirez, Richard C. Franklin, Donald Voaklander
J Prev Med Public Health. 2018;51(1):41-50.   Published online December 30, 2017
DOI: https://doi.org/10.3961/jpmph.17.112
  • 7,461 View
  • 205 Download
  • 6 Crossref
AbstractAbstract PDF
Objectives
To explore alcohol perceptions and their association hazardous alcohol use in the populations of Alberta, Canada and Queensland, Australia.
Methods
Data from 2500 participants of the 2013 Alberta Survey and the 2013 Queensland Social Survey was analyzed. Regression analyses were used to explore the association between alcohol perceptions and its association with hazardous alcohol use.
Results
Greater hazardous alcohol use was found in Queenslanders than Albertans (p<0.001). Overall, people with hazardous alcohol were less likely to believe that alcohol use contributes to health problems (odds ratio [OR], 0.46; 95% confidence interval [CI], 0.27 to 0.78; p<0.01) and to a higher risk of injuries (OR, 0.54; 95% CI, 0.33 to 0.90; p<0.05). Albertans with hazardous alcohol use were less likely to believe that alcohol contributes to health problems (OR, 0.48; 95% CI, 0.26 to 0.92; p<0.05) and were also less likely to choose a highly effective strategy as the best way for the government to reduce alcohol problems (OR, 0.63; 95% CI, 0.43 to 0.91; p=0.01). Queenslanders with hazardous alcohol use were less likely to believe that alcohol was a major contributor to injury (OR, 0.39; 95% CI, 0.20 to 0.77; p<0.01).
Conclusions
Our results suggest that people with hazardous alcohol use tend to underestimate the negative effect of alcohol consumption on health and its contribution to injuries. In addition, Albertans with hazardous alcohol use were less in favor of strategies considered highly effective to reduce alcohol harm, probably because they perceive them as a potential threat to their own alcohol consumption. These findings represent valuable sources of information for local health authorities and policymakers when designing suitable strategies to target alcohol-related problems.
Summary

Citations

Citations to this article as recorded by  
  • Prenatal alcohol exposure risk perception dimensions and influencing factors: A systematic review and conceptual model
    May N. Erng, Natasha Reid, Karen M. Moritz, Mieke van Driel
    Australian and New Zealand Journal of Public Health.2023; 47(3): 100047.     CrossRef
  • Differences in Perceived Threat and Efficacy in Managing Opioid Use Disorder versus Alcohol Use Disorder
    Vaishnavi Tata, Zahra Majd, Ashna Talwar, Shweta Bapat, Austin De La Cruz, James E. Essien, J. Douglas Thornton
    Substance Use & Misuse.2023; 58(10): 1187.     CrossRef
  • Identifying the Assumptions and Bias That Affect Screening and Brief Interventions for Harmful Alcohol Use
    Brenda Johnston
    Journal of the American Psychiatric Nurses Association.2022; 28(1): 76.     CrossRef
  • Rethinking Unhealthy Alcohol Use in the United States: A Structured Review
    Joseph R Volpicelli, Percy Menzies
    Substance Abuse: Research and Treatment.2022; 16: 117822182211118.     CrossRef
  • Proportion of cancer cases and deaths attributable to alcohol consumption by US state, 2013-2016
    Ann Goding Sauer, Stacey A. Fedewa, Priti Bandi, Adair K. Minihan, Michal Stoklosa, Jeffrey Drope, Susan M. Gapstur, Ahmedin Jemal, Farhad Islami
    Cancer Epidemiology.2021; 71: 101893.     CrossRef
  • Breathalysing and surveying river users in Australia to understand alcohol consumption and attitudes toward drowning risk
    Amy E. Peden, Richard C. Franklin, Peter A. Leggat
    BMC Public Health.2018;[Epub]     CrossRef
Hazardous Alcohol Use in 2 Countries: A Comparison Between Alberta, Canada and Queensland, Australia
Diana C. Sanchez-Ramirez, Richard Franklin, Donald Voaklander
J Prev Med Public Health. 2017;50(5):311-319.   Published online July 14, 2017
DOI: https://doi.org/10.3961/jpmph.17.040
  • 7,678 View
  • 136 Download
  • 10 Crossref
AbstractAbstract PDF
Objectives
This article aimed to compare alcohol consumption between the populations of Queensland in Australia and Alberta in Canada. Furthermore, the associations between greater alcohol consumption and socio-demographic characteristics were explored in each population. Methods: Data from 2500 participants of the 2013 Alberta Survey and the 2013 Queensland Social Survey were analyzed. Regression analyses were used to explore the associations between alcohol risk and socio-demographic characteristics. Results: A higher rate of hazardous alcohol use was found in Queenslanders than in Albertans. In both Albertans and Queenslanders, hazardous alcohol use was associated with being between 18 and 24 years of age. Higher income, having no religion, living alone, and being born in Canada were also associated with alcohol risk in Albertans; while in Queenslanders, hazardous alcohol use was also associated with common-law marital status. In addition, hazardous alcohol use was lower among respondents with a non-Catholic or Protestant religious affiliation. Conclusions: Younger age was associated with greater hazardous alcohol use in both populations. In addition, different socio-demographic factors were associated with hazardous alcohol use in each of the populations studied. Our results allowed us to identify the socio-demographic profiles associated with hazardous alcohol use in Alberta and Queensland. These profiles constitute valuable sources of information for local health authorities and policymakers when designing suitable preventive strategies targeting hazardous alcohol use. Overall, the present study highlights the importance of analyzing the socio-demographic factors associated with alcohol consumption in population-specific contexts.
Summary

Citations

Citations to this article as recorded by  
  • Relationship between attention deficit-hyperactivity disorder and substance use among college students in southeastern Iran
    Mansoor Kodori, Sajjad Khosravi, Nadia Oroomiei, Maryam Abdoli, Morteza Ali Moradi, Tahereh Fani, Leili Abedi Gheshlaghi
    Journal of Substance Use.2023; : 1.     CrossRef
  • Predicting Hazardous Alcohol Drinking Behaviors in Family Members of Hazardous Alcohol-Drinker Patients
    Ching-Yen Chen, Chen-Chun Lin, Jung-Ta Kao, Wen-Ling Yeh, Chiao-Yun Lin, Yun-Fang Tsai
    International Journal of Environmental Research and Public Health.2022; 19(9): 5497.     CrossRef
  • Alcohol use disorder and its associated factors among residents in Southern Ethiopia during the era of COVID-19
    Habtamu Endashaw Hareru, Abdene Weya Kaso, Berhanu Gidisa Debela, Lulu Abebe, Daniel Sisay W/tsadik, Reta Kassa Abebe, Chalachew Kassaw
    SAGE Open Medicine.2022; 10: 205031212211050.     CrossRef
  • Factors associated with alcohol use and abuse in Brazilian primary health care settings
    Tatiana Longo Borges, Ligiane Paula da Cruz de Sousa, Emilene Reisdorfer, Kelly Graziani Giacchero Vedana, Sandra Cristina Pillon, Adriana Inocenti Miasso
    Archives of Psychiatric Nursing.2021; 35(5): 486.     CrossRef
  • A scoping review of female drowning: an underexplored issue in five high-income countries
    Kym Roberts, Ogilvie Thom, Susan Devine, Peter A. Leggat, Amy E. Peden, Richard C. Franklin
    BMC Public Health.2021;[Epub]     CrossRef
  • Alcohol use disorder among prisoners in Debre Berhan prison, Ethiopia: a cross-sectional study
    Yohannes Gebreegziabhere Haile, Kaleab Berhanu Kebede, Asnake Limenhe, Kassahun Habatmu, Atalay Alem
    Substance Abuse Treatment, Prevention, and Policy.2020;[Epub]     CrossRef
  • A Bayesian shared components modeling approach to develop small area indicators of social determinants of health with measures of uncertainty
    Todd A. Norwood, Clarissa Encisa, Xiaotian Wang, Laura Seliske, Jessie Cunningham, Prithwish De
    Canadian Journal of Public Health.2020; 111(3): 342.     CrossRef
  • Prevalence of alcohol consumption and related factors among students of higher education centers in one of the northeastern cities of Iran
    Behrad Pourmohammadi, Moahammad Ali Jalilvand
    AIMS Public Health.2019; 6(4): 523.     CrossRef
  • Breathalysing and surveying river users in Australia to understand alcohol consumption and attitudes toward drowning risk
    Amy E. Peden, Richard C. Franklin, Peter A. Leggat
    BMC Public Health.2018;[Epub]     CrossRef
  • Alcohol Consumption and Risky Drinking Patterns among College Students from Selected Countries of the Carpathian Euroregion
    Maria Zadarko-Domaradzka, Zbigniew Barabasz, Marek Sobolewski, Edyta Nizioł-Babiarz, Beata Penar-Zadarko, Agnieszka Szybisty, Emilian Zadarko
    BioMed Research International.2018; 2018: 1.     CrossRef
Associations Between Socio-demographic Characteristics and Healthy Lifestyles in Korean Adults: The Result of the 2010 Community Health Survey
So Yeon Ryu, Jong Park, Seong Woo Choi, Mi Ah Han
J Prev Med Public Health. 2014;47(2):113-123.   Published online March 31, 2014
DOI: https://doi.org/10.3961/jpmph.2014.47.2.113
  • 12,007 View
  • 120 Download
  • 15 Crossref
AbstractAbstract PDF
Objectives

Several previous studies have found that healthy behaviors substantially reduce non-communicable disease incidence and mortality. The present study was performed to estimate the prevalence of four modifiable healthy behaviors and a healthy lifestyle among Korean adults according to socio-demographic and regional factors.

Methods

We analyzed data from 199 400 Korean adults aged 19 years and older who participated in the 2010 Korean Community Health Survey. We defined a healthy lifestyle as a combination of four modifiable healthy behaviors: non-smoking, moderate alcohol consumption, regular walking, and a healthy weight. We calculated the prevalence rates and odds ratios of each healthy behavior and healthy lifestyle according to socio-demographic and regional characteristics.

Results

The prevalence rates were as follows: non-smoking, 75.0% (53.7% in men, 96.6% in women); moderate alcohol consumption, 88.2% (79.7% in men, 96.9% in women); regular walking, 45.0% (46.2% in men, 43.8% in women); healthy weight, 77.4% (71.3% in men, 73.6% in women); and a healthy lifestyle, 25.5% (16.4% in men, 34.6% in women). The characteristics associated with a low prevalence of healthy lifestyle were male gender, younger age (19 to 44 years of age), low educational attainment, married, living in a rural area, living in the Chungcheong, Youngnam, or Gwangwon-Jeju region, and poorer self-rated health.

Conclusions

Further research should be implemented to explore the explainable factors of disparities for socio-demographic and regional characteristics to engage in the healthy lifestyle among adults.

Summary

Citations

Citations to this article as recorded by  
  • The influence of diet behavior on self-esteem according to the body image of workers in Republic of Korea: Mediating role of diet behavior
    Bohee So, Ki Han Kwon
    Journal of Human Behavior in the Social Environment.2024; 34(4): 584.     CrossRef
  • Determinants of unhealthy living by gender, age group, and chronic health conditions across districts in South Korea using the 2010-2017 Community Health Surveys
    Thi Tra Bui, Thi Huyen Trang Nguyen, Jinhee Lee, Sun Young Kim, Jin-Kyoung Oh
    Epidemiology and Health.2024; : e2024014.     CrossRef
  • Socio-demographic correlates of unhealthy lifestyle in Ethiopia: a secondary analysis of a national survey
    Yalemzewod Assefa Gelaw, Digsu N. Koye, Kefyalew Addis Alene, Kedir Y. Ahmed, Yibeltal Assefa, Daniel Asfaw Erku, Henok Getachew Tegegn, Azeb Gebresilassie Tesema, Berihun Megabiaw Zeleke, Yohannes Adama Melaku
    BMC Public Health.2023;[Epub]     CrossRef
  • Access to antenatal healthcare and the prevalence of oral clefts: a spatial analysis
    Hosung Shin, Eunsuk Ahn, Eun Joo Choi
    European Journal of Oral Sciences.2020; 128(2): 145.     CrossRef
  • Lifestyle risk score and mortality in Korean adults: a population-based cohort study
    Dong Hoon Lee, Jin Young Nam, Sohyeon Kwon, NaNa Keum, Jong-Tae Lee, Min-Jeong Shin, Hannah Oh
    Scientific Reports.2020;[Epub]     CrossRef
  • The Effect of Family-Based Empowerment on Obesity among Adolescents in Tana Toraja
    R. Erni Yetti, Muhammad Syafar, Andi Zulkifli, Rahayu Indriasari, Burhanuddin Bahar, Suriah ., Agus Bintara Birawida, Bagoes Widjanarko, Zadrak Tombeg, Saskiyanto Manggabara, Anto J. Hadi
    Pakistan Journal of Nutrition.2019; 18(9): 866.     CrossRef
  • Time trends in healthy lifestyle among adults in Germany: Results from three national health interview and examination surveys between 1990 and 2011
    Jonas D. Finger, Markus A. Busch, Christin Heidemann, Cornelia Lange, Gert B. M. Mensink, Anja Schienkiewitz, David Meyre
    PLOS ONE.2019; 14(9): e0222218.     CrossRef
  • Impact of marital status on outcomes following ST-segment elevation myocardial infarction
    Moo Hyun Kim, Kwang Min Lee, Soo Jin Kim, So Yeon Kim, Jong Seong Park, Young Rak Cho, Kyungil Park, Tae Ho Park, Young Dae Kim, Victor Serebruany
    Cardiovascular Revascularization Medicine.2018; 19(3): 237.     CrossRef
  • Adherence to Healthy Lifestyle Principles Among College Students: A Case Study
    Pavla Kubová, Helena Smolová, Hana Urbancová
    Acta Universitatis Agriculturae et Silviculturae Mendelianae Brunensis.2018; 66(2): 521.     CrossRef
  • Gender differences in walking (for leisure, transport and in total) across adult life: a systematic review
    Tessa M. Pollard, Janelle M. Wagnild
    BMC Public Health.2017;[Epub]     CrossRef
  • Association of Common Variants in eNOS Gene with Primary Open Angle Glaucoma: A Meta-Analysis
    Yang Xiang, Yi Dong, Xuan Li, Xin Tang
    Journal of Ophthalmology.2016; 2016: 1.     CrossRef
  • Socioeconomic Disparities in Osteoporosis Prevalence: Different Results in the Overall Korean Adult Population and Single-person Households
    Jungmee Kim, Joongyub Lee, Ju-Young Shin, Byung-Joo Park
    Journal of Preventive Medicine and Public Health.2015; 48(2): 84.     CrossRef
  • The association between income inequality and all-cause mortality across urban communities in Korea
    Jong Park, So-Yeon Ryu, Mi-ah Han, Seong-Woo Choi
    BMC Public Health.2015;[Epub]     CrossRef
  • Self-rated Subjective Health Status Is Strongly Associated with Sociodemographic Factors, Lifestyle, Nutrient Intakes, and Biochemical Indices, but Not Smoking Status: KNHANES 2007-2012
    Sunmin Park, Jaeouk Ahn, Byung-Kook Lee
    Journal of Korean Medical Science.2015; 30(9): 1279.     CrossRef
  • Men, masculinity, and pain
    Edmund Keogh
    Pain.2015; 156(12): 2408.     CrossRef
Drinking Patterns Among Korean Adults: Results of the 2009 Korean Community Health Survey
So Yeon Ryu, Catherine M. Crespi, Annette E. Maxwell
J Prev Med Public Health. 2013;46(4):183-191.   Published online July 31, 2013
DOI: https://doi.org/10.3961/jpmph.2013.46.4.183
  • 10,224 View
  • 107 Download
  • 25 Crossref
AbstractAbstract PDF
Objectives

In Korea, the proportion of deaths due to alcohol is estimated at 8.9%, far exceeding the global estimate of 3.8%. Therefore, this study was performed to examine the factors associated with low-risk, moderate-risk, and high-risk drinking patterns in Korean adults and to identify target populations for prevention and control of alcohol-related diseases and deaths.

Methods

We analyzed data from 230 715 Korean adults aged 19 years and older who participated in the 2009 Korean Community Health Survey. Multinomial logistic regression analysis was used to examine associations between socio-demographic and health-related factors and patterns of alcohol use.

Results

A substantially larger proportion of men than women engaged in high risk (21.2% vs. 3.4%) and moderate-risk alcohol use (15.5% vs. 8.2%). In both sexes, moderate- and high-risk uses were associated with younger age, higher income, being currently employed, smoking, being overweight/obese, and good self-rated health.

Conclusions

Given the large proportion of the population that is engaging in moderate- and high-risk drinking and given the social norms that support this behavior, public health policies and campaigns to reduce alcohol consumption targeting the entire population are indicated.

Summary

Citations

Citations to this article as recorded by  
  • Comparative Study of Diabetes Knowledge, Attitudes, Family Support, Self-efficacy, and Self-management Behaviors Between Cancer Survivors With Diabetes and Diabetes Patients Without Cancer
    Eun Jeong Ko, Su Jung Lee
    Cancer Nursing.2024;[Epub]     CrossRef
  • Health Behaviors of Cancer Survivors According to the Employment Status and Occupation: A Cross-Sectional Study
    Ka Ryeong Bae, Wi-Young So, Su Jung Lee
    Healthcare.2023; 11(22): 2974.     CrossRef
  • Association Between Age at Smoking Onset and Binge Drinking Among Adults in the Republic of Korea
    Sunhee Park, Haein Lee, Junghee Kim, Soyoon Min, Saekyae Shin
    International Journal of Mental Health and Addiction.2022; 20(1): 119.     CrossRef
  • Alcohol use recording in adults with depression in English primary care: a cross-sectional study
    Elizabeth Adesanya, Sarah Cook, Elizabeth Crellin, Sinead Langan, Kathryn Mansfield, Liam Smeeth, Emily Herrett
    BMJ Open.2022; 12(1): e055975.     CrossRef
  • Predictive inflammatory biomarkers for change in suicidal ideation in major depressive disorder and panic disorder: A 12-week follow-up study
    Kwan Woo Choi, Eun Hye Jang, Ah Young Kim, Hyewon Kim, Mi Jin Park, Sangwon Byun, Maurizio Fava, David Mischoulon, George I. Papakostas, Han Young Yu, Hong Jin Jeon
    Journal of Psychiatric Research.2021; 133: 73.     CrossRef
  • Association between Alcohol Drinking Status and Depressive Symptoms in Korean Adults
    Jung-Hwa Yang, Chang Kyun Choi, Hye-Yeon Kim, Young-Ran Heo, Min-Ho Shin
    Chonnam Medical Journal.2021; 57(1): 68.     CrossRef
  • An Association Rule Mining Analysis of Lifestyle Behavioral Risk Factors in Cancer Survivors with High Cardiovascular Disease Risk
    Su Jung Lee, Kathleen B. Cartmell
    Journal of Personalized Medicine.2021; 11(5): 366.     CrossRef
  • Gastric and rectal cancers in workers exposed to asbestos: a case series
    Byeong Ju Choi, Saerom Lee, Iu Jin Lee, Soon Woo Park, Sanggil Lee
    Annals of Occupational and Environmental Medicine.2020;[Epub]     CrossRef
  • Gender Difference in Longitudinal Social and Personal Factors Related to Frequency of Alcohol Consumption of South Korean Adults: A Fixed-Effects Model
    Baksun Sung
    Asia Pacific Journal of Public Health.2020; 32(5): 258.     CrossRef
  • Illuminating the treatment gap of mental disorders: A comparison of community survey-based and national registry-based prevalence rates in Korea
    MinKyung Jo, Soo Jung Rim, Min-Geu Lee, Subin Park
    Journal of Psychiatric Research.2020;[Epub]     CrossRef
  • Heterogenous Effect of Risk Factors on Breast Cancer across the Breast Density Categories in a Korean Screening Population
    Boyoung Park, Se-Eun Lim, HyoJin Ahn, Junghyun Yoon, Yun Su Choi
    Cancers.2020; 12(6): 1391.     CrossRef
  • The Association between Alcohol Drinking Patterns and Health-Related Quality of Life in the Korean Adult Population: Effects of Misclassification Error on Estimation of Association
    Eun Sook Lee, Boyoung Kim
    International Journal of Environmental Research and Public Health.2020; 17(21): 7758.     CrossRef
  • Symptom clusters in childhood cancer survivors in Korea: A latent class analysis
    Hye Chong Hong, Young Man Kim, Ari Min
    European Journal of Cancer Care.2020;[Epub]     CrossRef
  • Risk Factors of Binge Drinking in Adults Across Gender and Age Groups
    So Young Lee, Jeehae Chung
    Journal of Addictions Nursing.2020; 31(4): E27.     CrossRef
  • Serum ferritin level is associated with liver steatosis and fibrosis in Korean general population
    Ju Young Jung, Jae-Jun Shim, Sung Keun Park, Jae-Hong Ryoo, Joong-Myung Choi, In-Hwan Oh, Kyu-Won Jung, Hyunsoon Cho, Moran Ki, Young-Joo Won, Chang-Mo Oh
    Hepatology International.2019; 13(2): 222.     CrossRef
  • The Korean Cohort for the Model Predicting a Suicide and Suicide-related Behavior: Study rationale, methodology, and baseline sample characteristics of a long-term, large-scale, multi-center, prospective, naturalistic, observational cohort study
    C. Hyung Keun Park, Jae Won Lee, Sang Yeol Lee, Jung-Joon Moon, Dong-Wook Jeon, Se-Hoon Shim, Seong-Jin Cho, Shin Gyeom Kim, Jeewon Lee, Jong-Woo Paik, Min-Hyuk Kim, Seokho Kim, Jae-Hyun Park, Sungeun You, Hong Jin Jeon, Sang Jin Rhee, Yong Min Ahn
    Comprehensive Psychiatry.2019; 88: 29.     CrossRef
  • Trends and Correlates of High-Risk Alcohol Consumption and Types of Alcoholic Beverages in Middle-Aged Korean Adults: Results From the HEXA-G Study
    Jaesung Choi, Ji-Yeob Choi, Aesun Shin, Sang-Ah Lee, Kyoung-Mu Lee, Juhwan Oh, Joo Yong Park, Jong-koo Lee, Daehee Kang
    Journal of Epidemiology.2019; 29(4): 125.     CrossRef
  • Incidence of Diabetes Mellitus in Male Moderate Alcohol Drinkers: A Community-Based Prospective Cohort Study
    So Young Park, Su Jin Jeong, Morena Ustulin, Suk Chon, Jeong-taek Woo, Ji Eun Lim, Bermseok Oh, Sang Youl Rhee
    Archives of Medical Research.2019; 50(5): 315.     CrossRef
  • Alcohol-induced disinhibition is associated with impulsivity, depression, and suicide attempt: A nationwide community sample of Korean adults
    Kwan Woo Choi, Eun Jin Na, Jin Pyo Hong, Maeng Je Cho, Maurizio Fava, David Mischoulon, Hana Cho, Hong Jin Jeon
    Journal of Affective Disorders.2018; 227: 323.     CrossRef
  • Recent Trend and Associated Factors of Harmful Alcohol Use Based on Age and Gender in Korea
    Seung-Ah Choe, Seunghyun Yoo, Jung JeKarl, Kwang Kee Kim
    Journal of Korean Medical Science.2018;[Epub]     CrossRef
  • Developing the High-Risk Drinking Scorecard Model in Korea
    Jun-Tae Han, Il-Su Park, Suk-Bok Kang, Byeong-Gyu Seo
    Osong Public Health and Research Perspectives.2018; 9(5): 231.     CrossRef
  • Stomach Cancer Disparity among Korean Americans by Tumor Characteristics: Comparison with Non-Hispanic Whites, Japanese Americans, South Koreans, and Japanese
    Eunjung Lee, Lihua Liu, Juanjuan Zhang, Mariana C. Stern, Afsaneh Barzi, Amie Hwang, Andre E. Kim, Ann S. Hamilton, Anna H. Wu, Dennis Deapen
    Cancer Epidemiology, Biomarkers & Prevention.2017; 26(4): 587.     CrossRef
  • Alcohol Consumption during Pregnancy: Analysis of Two Direct Metabolites of Ethanol in Meconium
    Arantza Sanvisens, Neus Robert, José Hernández, Paola Zuluaga, Magí Farré, Wifredo Coroleu, Montserrat Serra, Jordi Tor, Robert Muga
    International Journal of Molecular Sciences.2016; 17(3): 417.     CrossRef
  • Genetic variants in 3′-UTRs of methylenetetrahydrofolate reductase (MTHFR) predict colorectal cancer susceptibility in Koreans
    Young Joo Jeon, Jong Woo Kim, Hye Mi Park, Jung O Kim, Hyo Geun Jang, Jisu Oh, Seong Gyu Hwang, Sung Won Kwon, Doyeun Oh, Nam Keun Kim
    Scientific Reports.2015;[Epub]     CrossRef
  • Factors Influencing Life Satisfaction in Korean Baby-boomer Men with Drinking Problems
    Minju Kim
    Journal of muscle and joint health.2013; 20(3): 207.     CrossRef
Special Article
Burden of Noncommunicable Diseases and National Strategies to Control Them in Korea
Young-Ho Khang
J Prev Med Public Health. 2013;46(4):155-164.   Published online July 31, 2013
DOI: https://doi.org/10.3961/jpmph.2013.46.4.155
Correction in: J Prev Med Public Health 2013;46(5):292
  • 21,037 View
  • 146 Download
  • 18 Crossref
AbstractAbstract PDF

Noncommunicable diseases (NCDs) are the most important causes of premature mortality and disability-adjusted life years in Korea. NCDs are also the main contributor to socioeconomic inequalities in mortality and life expectancy. Reduction of NCDs and NCD inequalities would result in significant improvement in healthy life expectancy and health equity in Korea. Major NCD risk factors such as dietary risks (including salt intake), alcohol consumption, cigarette smoking, and high blood pressure were found to be the leading modifiable risk factors of disability-adjusted life years in Korea, based on the 2010 Global Burden of Disease Study. Several Korean studies have shown that these risk factors play an important role in creating socioeconomic inequalities in NCD mortality and total mortality. Current international discussions on NCD policies in the United Nations and the World Health Organization would provide better opportunities for developing aggressive population-wide policy measures in Korea. Considering the paucity of population-wide policies to control major NCD risk factors in Korea, rigorous population approaches such as taxation and regulation of unhealthy commodities as well as public education and mass campaigns should be further developed in Korea.

Summary

Citations

Citations to this article as recorded by  
  • Population health outcomes in South Korea 1990–2019, and projections up to 2040: a systematic analysis for the Global Burden of Disease Study 2019
    Seoyeon Park, Min Seo Kim, Dong Keon Yon, Seung Won Lee, Joseph L Ward, Susan A McLaughlin, Max L Mehlman, Ai Koyanagi, Lee Smith, Louis Jacob, Suneth Buddhika Agampodi, Maryam Beiranvand, Dong-Woo Choi, Sung Hwi Hong, Mehdi Hosseinzadeh, Cho-il Kim, Gyu
    The Lancet Public Health.2023; 8(8): e639.     CrossRef
  • Perception of students on factors contributing to overweight and obesity among high school students in Kiribati: A qualitative study
    Tanebu Julia Tong, Masoud Mohammadnezhad, Nasser Salem Alqahtani, Mosese Salusalu, Petri Böckerman
    PLOS ONE.2022; 17(1): e0260900.     CrossRef
  • Perception of School Committee Members (SCMs) on Factors Contributing to Overweight and Obesity Among High School Students in Kiribati: A Qualitative Study
    Tanebu J. Tong, Masoud Mohammadnezhad, Nasser Salem Alqahtani, Mosese Salusalu
    Frontiers in Public Health.2022;[Epub]     CrossRef
  • Engaging Through Awareness: Purpose-Driven Framework Development to Evaluate and Develop Future Business Strategies With Exponential Technologies Toward Healthcare Democratization
    Beatrice Barbazzeni, Sultan Haider, Michael Friebe
    Frontiers in Public Health.2022;[Epub]     CrossRef
  • Effects of Behavioral Risk Factors and Social-Environmental Factors on Non-Communicable Diseases in South Korea: A National Survey Approach
    Nam Jeong Jeong, Eunil Park, Angel P. del Pobil
    International Journal of Environmental Research and Public Health.2021; 18(2): 612.     CrossRef
  • Organization of oncological care for patients with colorectal cancer (narrative review)
    O.P. Krashenkov, I.O. Ivanikov, Iu.S. Konstantinova, Ya.I. Kochetkova, A.P. Krashenkova, N.N. Vinogradova
    Dokazatel'naya gastroenterologiya.2021; 10(1): 17.     CrossRef
  • Smart devices and healthy aging
    Sergio Vinciguerra, Manlio Vinciguerra
    Nutrition and Healthy Aging.2019; 5(1): 13.     CrossRef
  • Risk indicators and effects of hypertension on HIV/AIDS disease progression among patients seen at Kenyatta hospital HIV care center
    Angeline Chepchirchir, Walter Jaoko, Joshua Nyagol
    AIDS Care.2018; 30(5): 544.     CrossRef
  • Self-management of Chronic Conditions Using mHealth Interventions in Korea: A Systematic Review
    Jae Yoon Yi, Yujin Kim, Yoon-Min Cho, Hongsoo Kim
    Healthcare Informatics Research.2018; 24(3): 187.     CrossRef
  • The P4 Health Spectrum – A Predictive, Preventive, Personalized and Participatory Continuum for Promoting Healthspan
    Michael Sagner, Amy McNeil, Pekka Puska, Charles Auffray, Nathan D. Price, Leroy Hood, Carl J. Lavie, Ze-Guang Han, Zhu Chen, Samir Kumar Brahmachari, Bruce S. McEwen, Marcelo B. Soares, Rudi Balling, Elissa Epel, Ross Arena
    Progress in Cardiovascular Diseases.2017; 59(5): 506.     CrossRef
  • The prevalence and risk factor control associated with noncommunicable diseases in China, Japan, and Korea
    Defu Ma, Hiromichi Sakai, Chihiro Wakabayashi, Jong-Sook Kwon, Yoonna Lee, Shuo Liu, Qiaoqin Wan, Kumiko Sasao, Kanade Ito, Ken Nishihara, Peiyu Wang
    Journal of Epidemiology.2017; 27(12): 568.     CrossRef
  • The P4 Health Spectrum – A Predictive, Preventive, Personalized and Participatory Continuum for Promoting Healthspan
    Michael Sagner, Amy McNeil, Pekka Puska, Charles Auffray, Nathan D. Price, Leroy Hood, Carl J. Lavie, Ze-Guang Han, Zhu Chen, Samir Kumar Brahmachari, Bruce S. McEwen, Marcelo B. Soares, Rudi Balling, Elissa Epel, Ross Arena
    Progress in Preventive Medicine.2017; 2(1): e0002.     CrossRef
  • Who will deliver comprehensive healthy lifestyle interventions to combat non-communicable disease? Introducing the healthy lifestyle practitioner discipline
    Ross Arena, Carl J Lavie, Marie-France Hivert, Mark A Williams, Paige D Briggs, Marco Guazzi
    Expert Review of Cardiovascular Therapy.2016; 14(1): 15.     CrossRef
  • Health Performance and Challenges in Korea: a Review of the Global Burden of Disease Study 2013
    Yo Han Lee, Seok-Jun Yoon, Arim Kim, Hyeyoung Seo, Seulki Ko
    Journal of Korean Medical Science.2016; 31(Suppl 2): S114.     CrossRef
  • Disability-Adjusted Life Years (DALYs) for Injuries Using Death Certificates and Hospital Discharge Survey by the Korean Burden of Disease Study 2012
    Won Kyung Lee, Dohee Lim, Hyesook Park
    Journal of Korean Medical Science.2016; 31(Suppl 2): S200.     CrossRef
  • Strategies to reduce risk factors of non-communicable diseases in South Korea
    Young-Ho Khang
    Korean Journal of Health Education and Promotion.2016; 33(4): 1.     CrossRef
  • National Priority Setting of Clinical Practice Guidelines Development for Chronic Disease Management
    Heui-Sug Jo, Dong Ik Kim, Moo-Kyung Oh
    Journal of Korean Medical Science.2015; 30(12): 1733.     CrossRef
  • Burden of Disease in Japan: Using National and Subnational Data to Inform Local Health Policy
    Stuart Gilmour, Yi Liao, Ver Bilano, Kenji Shibuya
    Journal of Preventive Medicine & Public Health.2014; 47(3): 136.     CrossRef
Original Article
Alcohol Consumption and Mortality in the Korean Multi-center Cancer Cohort Study
En-Joo Jung, Aesun Shin, Sue K. Park, Seung-Hyun Ma, In-Seong Cho, Boyoung Park, Eun-Ha Lee, Soung-Hoon Chang, Hai-Rim Shin, Daehee Kang, Keun-Young Yoo
J Prev Med Public Health. 2012;45(5):301-308.   Published online September 28, 2012
DOI: https://doi.org/10.3961/jpmph.2012.45.5.301
  • 12,025 View
  • 106 Download
  • 16 Crossref
AbstractAbstract PDF
Objectives

To examine the association between alcohol consumption habit, types of beverages, alcohol consumption quantity, and overall and cancer-specific mortality among Korean adults.

Methods

The alcohol consumption information of a total of 16 320 participants who were 20 years or older from the Korean Multi-center Cancer Cohort were analyzed to examine the association between alcohol consumption habit and mortality (median follow-up of 9.3 years). The Cox proportional hazard model was used to estimate the hazard ratio (HR) of alcohol consumption to mortality adjusting for age, sex, geographic areas, education, smoking status, and body mass index.

Results

Alcohol drinkers showed an increased risk for total mortality compared with never drinkers (HR, 1.72; 95% confidence interval [CI], 1.38 to 2.14 for past drinkers; HR, 1.21; 95% CI, 1.06 to 1.39 for current drinkers), while past drinkers only were associated with higher risk for cancer deaths (HR, 1.84; 95% CI, 1.34 to 2.53). The quantity of alcohol consumed per week showed a J-shaped association with risk of mortality. Relative to light drinkers (0.01 to 90 g/wk), never drinkers and heavy drinkers (>504 g/wk) had an increased risk for all-cause and cancer deaths: (HR, 1.18; 95% CI, 0.96 to 1.45) and (HR, 1.39; 95% CI, 1.05 to 1.83) for all-cause mortality; and (HR, 1.55; 95% CI, 1.15 to 2.11) and (HR, 2.07; 95% CI, 1.39 to 3.09) for all cancer mortality, respectively. Heavy drinkers (>504 g/wk) showed an elevated risk for death from stomach and liver cancers.

Conclusions

The present study supports the existence of a J-shaped association between alcohol consumption quantity and the risk of all-cause and cancer deaths. Heavy drinkers had an increased risk of death from cancer overall and liver and stomach cancer.

Summary

Citations

Citations to this article as recorded by  
  • Alcohol consumption messages in Korean dramas: the globalization of South Korean drinking norms
    Rubini Pasupathy, Jaesook Gho, Brittany Duhart, Courtney Queen
    Global Health Promotion.2022; 29(3): 57.     CrossRef
  • Effect of preoperative psychiatric morbidity on postoperative outcomes of lung cancer surgery: A nationwide cohort study in South Korea
    In-Ae Song, Hye Yoon Park, Tak Kyu Oh
    Journal of Psychosomatic Research.2022; 161: 111002.     CrossRef
  • Alcohol, salud y enfermedad cardiovascular
    J. Masip, J.R. Germà Lluch
    Revista Clínica Española.2021; 221(6): 359.     CrossRef
  • Alcohol, health and cardiovascular disease
    J. Masip, J.R. Germà Lluch
    Revista Clínica Española (English Edition).2021; 221(6): 359.     CrossRef
  • Systematic Review with Meta-Analysis: Low-Level Alcohol Consumption and the Risk of Liver Cancer
    Hana Park, Seung Kak Shin, Ijin Joo, Do Seon Song, Jeong Won Jang, Joong-Won Park
    Gut and Liver.2020; 14(6): 792.     CrossRef
  • Alcohol consumption and gastric cancer risk in Korea: a case-control study
    Mi Hui Kim, Shin Ah Kim, Chan Hyuk Park, Chang Soo Eun, Dong Soo Han, Yong Sung Kim, Kyu Sang Song, Bo Youl Choi, Hyun Ja Kim
    Nutrition Research and Practice.2019; 13(5): 425.     CrossRef
  • Alcoholic Liver Disease Is Associated with an Increased Risk of Gastric Cancer
    Tae Hoon Ha, Byeong Gwan Kim, Donghyong Jeong, Sohee Oh, Won Kim, Yong Jin Jung, Dong Won Ahn, Ji Bong Jeong, Ji Won Kim, Kook Lae Lee, Seong-Joon Koh
    Digestive Diseases and Sciences.2017; 62(1): 273.     CrossRef
  • Alcohol Abuse Decreases Pelvic Control and Survival in Cervical Cancer
    Jyoti Mayadev, Chin-Shang Li, Jihoon Lim, Richard Valicenti, Edwin A. Alvarez
    American Journal of Clinical Oncology.2017; 40(5): 451.     CrossRef
  • Alcohol consumption and gastric cancer risk: a meta-analysis of prospective cohort studies
    Xue Han, Li Xiao, Yao Yu, Yu Chen, Hai-Hua Shu
    Oncotarget.2017; 8(47): 83237.     CrossRef
  • Association between alcohol consumption and the risk of gastric cancer: a meta-analysis of prospective cohort studies
    Zheng He, Ting-Ting Zhao, Hui-Mian Xu, Zhen-Ning Wang, Ying-Ying Xu, Yong-Xi Song, Zhong-Ran Ni, Hao Xu, Song-Cheng Yin, Xing-Yu Liu, Zhi-Feng Miao
    Oncotarget.2017; 8(48): 84459.     CrossRef
  • Alcohol consumption and liver cancer risk: a meta-analysis
    Shu-Chun Chuang, Yuan-Chin Amy Lee, Guo-Jie Wu, Kurt Straif, Mia Hashibe
    Cancer Causes & Control.2015; 26(9): 1205.     CrossRef
  • The relationship between mild alcohol consumption and mortality in Koreans: a systematic review and meta-analysis
    Ji-Eun Park, Tae-young Choi, Yeonhee Ryu, Sung-Il Cho
    BMC Public Health.2015;[Epub]     CrossRef
  • Association Between Alcohol Consumption and Risk of Cardiovascular Disease and All-Cause Mortality in Patients With Hypertension: A Meta-Analysis of Prospective Cohort Studies
    Chao Huang, Jian Zhan, Yu-Jian Liu, De-Jia Li, Su-Qing Wang, Qi-Qiang He
    Mayo Clinic Proceedings.2014; 89(9): 1201.     CrossRef
  • Attributable fraction of alcohol consumption on cancer using population-based nationwide cancer incidence and mortality data in the Republic of Korea
    Sohee Park, Hai-Rim Shin, Boram Lee, Aesun Shin, Kyu-Won Jung, Duk-Hee Lee, Sun Ha Jee, Sung-Il Cho, Sue Kyung Park, Mathieu Boniol, Paolo Boffetta, Elisabete Weiderpass
    BMC Cancer.2014;[Epub]     CrossRef
  • Alcohol and liver cancer: a systematic review and meta-analysis of prospective studies
    F. Turati, C. Galeone, M. Rota, C. Pelucchi, E. Negri, V. Bagnardi, G. Corrao, P. Boffetta, C. La Vecchia
    Annals of Oncology.2014; 25(8): 1526.     CrossRef
  • Alcohol Consumption and Viral Load Are Synergistically Associated with CIN1
    Kyung-Jin Min, Jae-Kwan Lee, Sanghoon Lee, Mi Kyung Kim, Rui Medeiros
    PLoS ONE.2013; 8(8): e72142.     CrossRef
English Abstracts
Estimating the Socioeconomic Costs of Alcohol Drinking Among Adolescents in Korea.
Jaeyeun Kim, Woojin Chung, Sunmi Lee, Chongyon Park
J Prev Med Public Health. 2010;43(4):341-351.
DOI: https://doi.org/10.3961/jpmph.2010.43.4.341
  • 5,853 View
  • 95 Download
  • 13 Crossref
AbstractAbstract PDF
OBJECTIVES
The purpose of this study was to estimate the socioeconomic costs resulting from alcohol drinking among adolescents as of 2006 from a societal perspective. METHODS: The costs were classified into direct costs, indirect costs, and other costs. The direct costs consisted of direct medical costs and direct non-medical costs. The indirect costs were computed by future income losses from premature death, productivity losses from using medical services and reduction of productivity from drinking and hangover. The other costs consisted of property damage, public administrative expenses, and traffic accident compensation. RESULTS: The socioeconomic costs of alcohol drinking among adolescents as of 2006 were estimated to be 387.5 billion won (0.05% of GDP). In the case of the former, the amount included 48.25% for reduction of productivity from drinking and hangover, 39.38% for future income losses from premature death, and 6.71% for hangover costs. CONCLUSIONS: The results showed that the socioeconomic costs of alcohol drinking among adolescents in Korea were a serious as compared with that of the United States. Therefore, the active interventions such as a surveillance system and a prevention program to control adolescents drinking by government and preventive medicine specialist are needed.
Summary

Citations

Citations to this article as recorded by  
  • Disparity between Subjective Health Perception and Lifestyle Practices among Korean Adolescents: A National Representative Sample
    Aniceto Echalico Braza, Jinsoo Jason Kim, Sun Hee Kim
    Journal of Lifestyle Medicine.2022; 12(3): 153.     CrossRef
  • Maternal working hours and smoking and drinking in adolescent children: based on the Korean National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey VI and VII
    Tae-Hwi Park, Yong-Duk Ahn, Jeong-Bae Rhie
    Annals of Occupational and Environmental Medicine.2021;[Epub]     CrossRef
  • Impact of Public Health Policies on Alcohol‐Associated Liver Disease in Latin America: An Ecological Multinational Study
    Luis Antonio Díaz, Francisco Idalsoaga, Eduardo Fuentes‐López, Andrea Márquez‐Lomas, Carolina A. Ramírez, Juan Pablo Roblero, Roberta C. Araujo, Fátima Higuera‐de‐la‐Tijera, Luis Guillermo Toro, Galo Pazmiño, Pedro Montes, Nelia Hernandez, Manuel Mendizab
    Hepatology.2021; 74(5): 2478.     CrossRef
  • Economic burden of alcohol-related cancers in the Republic of Korea
    Minji Han, Binh Thang Tran, Heeyoun Cho, Jin-Kyoung Oh
    Drug and Alcohol Dependence.2020; 217: 108295.     CrossRef
  • An Item Response Theory Analysis of the Korean Version of the CRAFFT Scale for Alcohol Use Among Adolescents in Korea
    Youngshin Song, Hyerang Kim, So-Youn Park
    Asian Nursing Research.2019; 13(4): 249.     CrossRef
  • Development of Addiction Prevention Care Program for Nurses
    Sungjae Kim, Se-Jin Joo, Young Ok Song, Jin-Gyung Cha, Jeongwoon Yang
    STRESS.2019; 27(4): 389.     CrossRef
  • Characteristics of sauna deaths in Korea in relation to different blood alcohol concentrations
    Kyung-Moo Yang, Bong-Woo Lee, Jaeseong Oh, Seong Ho Yoo
    Forensic Science, Medicine and Pathology.2018; 14(3): 307.     CrossRef
  • High prevalence of sarcopenia among binge drinking elderly women: a nationwide population-based study
    Jun-Il Yoo, Yong-Chan Ha, Young-Kyun Lee, Hana-Choi, Moon-Jib Yoo, Kyung-Hoi Koo
    BMC Geriatrics.2017;[Epub]     CrossRef
  • An effective hangover treatment: Friend or foe?
    Marlou Mackus, Marith van Schrojenstein Lantman, Aurora JAE van de Loo, David Nutt, Joris C Verster
    Drug Science, Policy and Law.2017; 3: 205032451774103.     CrossRef
  • Does the Severity of Hangovers Decline with Age? Survey of the Incidence of Hangover in Different Age Groups
    Janne S. Tolstrup, Richard Stephens, Morten Grønbaek
    Alcoholism: Clinical and Experimental Research.2014; 38(2): 466.     CrossRef
  • The economic burden of the 2009 pandemic H1N1 influenza in Korea
    Yang-Woo Kim, Seok-Jun Yoon, In-Hwan Oh
    Scandinavian Journal of Infectious Diseases.2013; 45(5): 390.     CrossRef
  • Consumer Satisfaction and Efficacy of the Hangover Cure After-Effect©
    J. C. Verster, O. Berthélemy
    Advances in Preventive Medicine.2012; 2012: 1.     CrossRef
  • Moderate drinking and motivational enhancement therapy
    Kang-Sook Lee
    Journal of the Korean Medical Association.2011; 54(10): 1047.     CrossRef
Cohort Study on the Association between Alcohol Consumption and the Risk of Colorectal Cancer in the Korean Elderly.
Hoi Jeong Lim, Byung Joo Park
J Prev Med Public Health. 2008;41(1):23-29.
DOI: https://doi.org/10.3961/jpmph.2008.41.1.23
  • 5,514 View
  • 66 Download
  • 12 Crossref
AbstractAbstract PDF
OBJECTIVES
We examined the association between alcohol consumption and incidence of colorectal cancer in elderly Koreans. METHODS: The cohort members (n=14,304) consisted of 4,834 males and 9,470 females derived from the Korea Elderly Pharmacoepidemiologic Cohort (KEPEC), a population-based dynamic cohort. They were aged 65 years old or older and lived in Busan between 1993-1998; they were beneficiaries of the Korean Medical Insurance Corporation (KMIC). Baseline information was surveyed by a self-administered, mailed questionnaire. This study population was restricted to 14,304 participants who reported alcohol drinking habits on the questionnaire and had not been diagnosed with colorectal cancer at baseline. The adjusted hazard ratios (aHR) of status, type, frequency and daily average amount of alcohol consumption were computed with Cox's proportional hazard model, with the never-drinkers as a reference group and controlling for age and gender. RESULTS: After 4.82 person-years of mean follow-up 112 cases of colorectal cancer occurred. The incidence densities of colorectal cancer were 161 (95% CI=123-200) for never-drinkers, 219 (95% CI=125-339) for ex-drinkers, and 137 (95% CI=84-189) for current-drinkers per 100,000 person-year. The status, type, frequency, and daily average amount of alcohol consumption were not significantly related to the incidence of colorectal cancer after controlling for age and gender. CONCLSIONS: There was no significant association between alcohol consumption and colorectal cancer among elderly people after controlling for age and gender.
Summary

Citations

Citations to this article as recorded by  
  • Sex difference in alcohol consumption associated with colorectal cancer risk in Quzhou, China: A nested case-control study
    Shi-Ming Lai, Hong-Hong Zhu, Zhi-Juan Gan, Bi-Yun Zheng, Zhao-Hui Xu, Zhi-Cheng Wang, Xiao-Fang Liao
    Preventive Medicine Reports.2024; 44: 102807.     CrossRef
  • Wine consumption and colorectal cancer risk: a meta-analysis of observational studies
    Weisong Xu, Hui Fan, Zhijuan Han, Yufeng Liu, Yiping Wang, Zhenming Ge
    European Journal of Cancer Prevention.2019; 28(3): 151.     CrossRef
  • Marital status and education as risk factors for colorectal cancer
    A. Ruseva, D. Tochev, Z. Boneva, Y. Assyov, L. Georgieva, D. Nikolovska
    Trakia Journal of Sciences.2019; 17(3): 224.     CrossRef
  • Consumption of beer and colorectal cancer incidence: a meta-analysis of observational studies
    Cheng Zhang, Min Zhong
    Cancer Causes & Control.2015; 26(4): 549.     CrossRef
  • Alcohol Drinking, Cigarette Smoking and Risk of Colorectal Cancer in the Korean Multi-center Cancer Cohort
    Sooyoung Cho, Aesun Shin, Sue K. Park, Hai-Rim Shin, Soung-Hoon Chang, Keun-Young Yoo
    Journal of Cancer Prevention.2015; 20(2): 147.     CrossRef
  • The relationship between mild alcohol consumption and mortality in Koreans: a systematic review and meta-analysis
    Ji-Eun Park, Tae-young Choi, Yeonhee Ryu, Sung-Il Cho
    BMC Public Health.2015;[Epub]     CrossRef
  • Attributable fraction of alcohol consumption on cancer using population-based nationwide cancer incidence and mortality data in the Republic of Korea
    Sohee Park, Hai-Rim Shin, Boram Lee, Aesun Shin, Kyu-Won Jung, Duk-Hee Lee, Sun Ha Jee, Sung-Il Cho, Sue Kyung Park, Mathieu Boniol, Paolo Boffetta, Elisabete Weiderpass
    BMC Cancer.2014;[Epub]     CrossRef
  • Alcohol drinking and colorectal cancer risk: an overall and dose–response meta-analysis of published studies
    V. Fedirko, I. Tramacere, V. Bagnardi, M. Rota, L. Scotti, F. Islami, E. Negri, K. Straif, I. Romieu, C. La Vecchia, P. Boffetta, M. Jenab
    Annals of Oncology.2011; 22(9): 1958.     CrossRef
  • Alcohol intake and risk of colorectal cancer: Results from the UK Dietary Cohort Consortium
    J Y Park, C C Dahm, R H Keogh, P N Mitrou, B J Cairns, D C Greenwood, E A Spencer, I S Fentiman, M J Shipley, E J Brunner, J E Cade, V J Burley, G D Mishra, D Kuh, A M Stephen, I R White, R N Luben, A A Mulligan, K-T Khaw, S A Rodwell
    British Journal of Cancer.2010; 103(5): 747.     CrossRef
  • Alcohol Consumption and Digestive Cancer Mortality in Koreans: The Kangwha Cohort Study
    Sang-Wook Yi, Jae Woong Sull, John Alderman Linton, Chung Mo Nam, Heechoul Ohrr
    Journal of Epidemiology.2010; 20(3): 204.     CrossRef
  • Baseline alcohol consumption, type of alcoholic beverage and risk of colorectal cancer in the European Prospective Investigation into Cancer and Nutrition-Norfolk study
    Jin Young Park, Panagiota N. Mitrou, Christina C. Dahm, Robert N. Luben, Nicholas J. Wareham, Kay-Tee Khaw, Sheila A. Rodwell
    Cancer Epidemiology.2009; 33(5): 347.     CrossRef
  • A Novel Polymorphism rs1329149 of CYP2E1 and a Known Polymorphism rs671 of ALDH2 of Alcohol Metabolizing Enzymes Are Associated with Colorectal Cancer in a Southwestern Chinese Population
    Huan Yang, Yanhong Zhou, Ziyuan Zhou, Jinyi Liu, Xiaoyan Yuan, Ketaro Matsuo, Toshiro Takezaki, Kazuo Tajima, Jia Cao
    Cancer Epidemiology, Biomarkers & Prevention.2009; 18(9): 2522.     CrossRef
Multicenter Study
Cigarette Smoking, Alcohol Consumption, Tuberculosis and Risk of Lung Cancer: The Korean Multi-center Cancer Cohort Study.
Jisuk Bae, Jin Gwack, Sue Kyung Park, Hai Rim Shin, Soung Hoon Chang, Keun Young Yoo
J Prev Med Public Health. 2007;40(4):321-328.
DOI: https://doi.org/10.3961/jpmph.2007.40.4.321
  • 5,955 View
  • 118 Download
  • 10 Crossref
AbstractAbstract PDF
OBJECTIVES
The aim of this study was to evaluate the roles of cigarette smoking, alcohol consumption, tuberculosis, and their interactions in the risk of lung cancer in a Korean cohort. METHODS: The study subjects comprised 13,150 males and females aged above 20 years old. During the follow up period from 1993 to 2002, 79 lung cancer cases were identified by the central cancer registry and the national death certificate database. Information on cigarette smoking, alcohol consumption and the history of physiciandiagnosed tuberculosis was obtained by interview. Indirect chest X-ray findings were also evaluated to ascertain tuberculosis cases. Cox proportional hazard models were used to estimate relative risks (RR) and 95% confidence intervals (CI) after adjusting for age and gender. RESULTS: Cigarette smoking was statistically significantly associated with an increased risk of lung cancer [for current smokers, RR = 2.33 (95% CI = 1.23 - 4.42) compared to non-smokers]. After further adjustment for cigarette smoking, both alcohol consumption and tuberculosis showed no statistically significant association with the risk of lung cancer [for current drinkers, RR = 0.80 (95% CI = 0.48 - 1.33) compared to non-drinkers] [for tuberculosis cases, RR = 1.17 (95% CI = 0.58 - 2.36) compared to noncases]. There was no statistically significant interaction between cigarette smoking and alcohol consumption (pinteraction = 0.38), or cigarette smoking and tuberculosis (p-interaction = 0.74). CONCLUSIONS: Although cigarette smoking was confirmed as a risk factor of lung cancer in this cohort study, this study suggests that alcohol consumption and tuberculosis may not be associated with the risk of lung cancer.
Summary

Citations

Citations to this article as recorded by  
  • Study on changes in Ryodoraku test according to carbon monoxide concentration in exhaled breath
    Jin Suk Koo
    Journal of Korean Medicine.2020; 41(1): 45.     CrossRef
  • Effect of COPD on symptoms, quality of life and prognosis in patients with advanced non-small cell lung cancer
    Young-Soo Yi, Woo Ho Ban, Kyeong-Yae Sohng
    BMC Cancer.2018;[Epub]     CrossRef
  • SmokeHaz
    Leah Jayes, Patricia L. Haslam, Christina G. Gratziou, Pippa Powell, John Britton, Constantine Vardavas, Carlos Jimenez-Ruiz, Jo Leonardi-Bee, Bertrand Dautzenberg, Bo Lundbäck, Monica Fletcher, Archie Turnbull, Paraskevi Katsaounou, Dick Heederik, Dan Sm
    Chest.2016; 150(1): 164.     CrossRef
  • Evaluation of Pulmonary Nodules
    Chunxue Bai, Chang-Min Choi, Chung Ming Chu, Devanand Anantham, James Chung-man Ho, Ali Zamir Khan, Jang-Ming Lee, Shi Yue Li, Sawang Saenghirunvattana, Anthony Yim
    Chest.2016; 150(4): 877.     CrossRef
  • Completeness of Cancer Case Ascertainment in Korea Radiation Effect and Epidemiology Cohort Study
    Minkyo Song, In-Seong Cho, Zhong Min Li, Yoon-Ok Ahn
    Journal of Korean Medical Science.2012; 27(5): 489.     CrossRef
  • Prior lung disease and lung cancer risk in an occupational-based cohort in Yunnan, China
    Ya-Guang Fan, Yong Jiang, Run-Sheng Chang, Shu-Xiang Yao, Ping Jin, Wendy Wang, Jie He, Qing-hua Zhou, Philip Prorok, You-Lin Qiao, Ping Hu
    Lung Cancer.2011; 72(2): 258.     CrossRef
  • Increased Lung Cancer Risk among Patients with Pulmonary Tuberculosis: A Population Cohort Study
    Yang-Hao Yu, Chien-Chang Liao, Wu-Huei Hsu, Hung-Jen Chen, Wei-Chih Liao, Chih-Hsin Muo, Fung-Chang Sung, Chih-Yi Chen
    Journal of Thoracic Oncology.2011; 6(1): 32.     CrossRef
  • Lung cancer risk and cigarette smoking, lung tuberculosis according to histologic type and gender in a population based case–control study
    Sue K. Park, Lisa Y. Cho, Jae Jeong Yang, Boyoung Park, Soung Hoon Chang, Kun-Sei Lee, Hyeongsu Kim, Keun-Young Yoo, Choon-Taek Lee
    Lung Cancer.2010; 68(1): 20.     CrossRef
  • Facts and fiction of the relationship between preexisting tuberculosis and lung cancer risk: A systematic review
    Hui‐Ying Liang, Xue‐Lian Li, Xiao‐Song Yu, Peng Guan, Zhi‐Hua Yin, Qin‐Cheng He, Bao‐Sen Zhou
    International Journal of Cancer.2009; 125(12): 2936.     CrossRef
  • Irinotecan and oxaliplatin combination as the first-line treatment for patients with advanced non-small cell lung cancer
    Myung Hee Chang, Kyoung Ha Kim, Hyun Jung Jun, Hyo Song Kim, Seong Yoon Yi, Ji Eun Uhm, Min Jae Park, Do Hyoung Lim, Sang Hoon Ji, In Gyu Hwang, Jeeyun Lee, Yeon Hee Park, Jin Seok Ahn, Myung-ju Ahn, Keunchil Park
    Cancer Chemotherapy and Pharmacology.2009; 64(5): 917.     CrossRef
Original Article
Prevalence of Hazardous and Harmful Alcohol Consumption Using Alcohol Use Disorders Identification Test in Chungju Area.
Hyeongsu Kim, Sounghoon Chang, Kunsei Lee, Cheongsik Kim, Kiock Kim
Korean J Prev Med. 2001;34(3):277-283.
  • 1,895 View
  • 27 Download
AbstractAbstract PDF
OBJECTIVES
To investigate the prevalence of hazardous and harmful alcohol use, which are a subthreshold of alcohol related disorders. METHODS: Direct-interview questionnaires to 1,183 rural persons (489 male, 694 female) were conducted in Chungju-city from July 2 to 26, 1998. As a screening instrument, the alcohol use disorders identification test (AUDIT) was used. RESULTS: The prevalence of alcohol use was 41.7%. In males, it was 66.3% and in females, it was 24.4%. The mean of the AUDIT score of males and females was 13.2 and 5.6, respectively. As WHO guideline, the prevalence of hazardous alcohol use in males and females was 80.3% and 20.7%, respectively. This suggests that the prevalence of 'hazardous drinking' and 'harmful drinking' was 45.4% and 29.3% for males and 1.2% and 2.4% for females, respectively. CONCLUSIONS: This study presented the prevalence of hazardous and harmful drinking of a rural population in Korea and reviewed those health problems. Further evaluation to detect and treat lower alcoholic drinkers is recommended
Summary
English Abstract
Socioeconomic Costs of Alcohol Drinking in Korea.
Woo Jin Chung, Hyun Jun Chun, Sun Mi Lee
J Prev Med Public Health. 2006;39(1):21-29.
  • 2,756 View
  • 101 Download
AbstractAbstract PDF
OBJECTIVES
We wanted to estimate the annual socioeconomic costs of alcohol drinking in Korea. METHODS: The costs were classified as direct costs, indirect costs and the other costs. The direct costs consisted of direct medical costs, indirect medical costs and subsidiary medical costs. Particularly, the medical costs and population attributable fraction for disease were considered to reflect the calculation of the direct medical costs. The indirect costs were computed by the extent to which the loss of productivity and loss of the workforce might have occurred due to changes in mortality and morbidity according to alcohol drinking. The other costs consisted of property loss, administration costs and costs of alcoholic beverage. RESULTS: The annual costs, which seemed to be attributable to alcohol drinking, were estimated to be 149,352 hundred million won (2.86% of GDP). In case of the latter, the amount includes 9,091 hundred million won for direct costs (6.09%), 62,845 hundred million won for the reduction and loss of productivity (42.08%), 44,691 hundred million won for loss of the workforce (29.92%), and the other costs (21.91%). CONCLUSIONS: Our study confirms that compared with the cases of Japan (1.9% of GNP) and the other advanced countries (1.00-1.42% of GDP), alcohol drinking incurs substantial socioeconomic costs to the Korean society. Therefore, this study provides strong support for government interventions to control alcohol drinking in Korea.
Summary
Original Article
Association between Alcohol Drinking and Cardiovascular Disease Mortality and All-cause Mortality: Kangwha Cohort Study.
Sang Wook Yi, Sang Hyun Yoo, Jae Woong Sull, Heechoul Ohrr
J Prev Med Public Health. 2004;37(2):120-126.
  • 2,451 View
  • 113 Download
AbstractAbstract PDF
OBJECTIONS: This study sought to examine relationships between alcohol drinking and cardiovascular disease mortality and all-cause mortality. METHODS: From March 1985 through December 1999, 2, 696 males and 3, 595 females aged 55 or over as of 1985 were followed up for their mortality until 31 December 1999. We calculated the mortality risk ratios by level of alcohol consumption. Among the drinker, the level of alcohol consumption was calculated by the frequency of alcohol comsumption and the type of alcohol. Cox proportional hazard model was used to adjust for confounding factors. RESULTS: Among males, compared to abstainer, heavy drinker had significantly higher mortality in all cause (Risk ratio=1.35), cardiovascular disease (Risk ratio=1.52) and cerebrovascular disease (Risk ratio =1.66). Although not significant, moderate drinker had lower ischemic heart disease mortality (Risk ratio =0.38). Among females, there was no statistically significant association between alcohol comsumption and mortality. CONCLUSION: The results of this study suggest that alcohol drinking has harmful effect on all-cause mortality, cardiovascular disease mortality and cerebrovascular disease mortality among males, especially in heavy drinker among males. Minimal evidence on protective effect for cardiovascular disease mortality in low or moderate drinker is observed.
Summary

JPMPH : Journal of Preventive Medicine and Public Health