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Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Association Between Meat Consumption and Carotid Intima-Media Thickness in Korean Adults with Metabolic Syndrome.
Sun Min Oh, Hyeon Chang Kim, Song Vogue Ahn, Hye Jin Chi, Il Suh
J Prev Med Public Health. 2010;43(6):486-495.
DOI: https://doi.org/10.3961/jpmph.2010.43.6.486
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  • 78 Download
  • 10 Crossref
AbstractAbstract PDF
OBJECTIVES
The effect of meat consumption on cardiometabolic risk has been continuously studied, but their associations are not conclusive. The aim of this study is to examine the association between the consumption of meat or red meat and carotid intima-media thickness (IMT) in healthy Korean adults. METHODS: This study evaluated 2374 community-dwelling adults (933 men and 1441 women) who were free of cardiovascular disease or cancer, living in a rural area in Korea. Total meat and red meat intakes were assessed with a validated 103 item-food frequency questionnaire. Carotid IMT was evaluated ultrasonographically, IMTmax was defined as the highest value among IMT of bilateral common carotid arteries. RESULTS: After adjustment for potential confounding factors, the mean IMTmax tended to increase in higher meat consumption groups in both men and women with metabolic syndrome (p for trend= 0.027 and 0.049, respectively), but not in participants without metabolic syndrome. Frequent meat consumption (> or =5 servings/week) was significantly associated with higher IMTmax in men with metabolic syndrome (by 0.08 mm, p=0.015). Whereas, the association was not significant in women (by 0.05 mm, p=0.115). Similar but attenuated findings were shown with red meat intake. CONCLUSIONS: Our findings suggest that a higher meat consumption may be associated with a higher carotid IMT in Korean adults with metabolic syndrome. The frequent meat consumption (> or =5 servings/week), compared with the others, was associated with a higher carotid IMTmax only in men with metabolic syndrome. Further research is required to explore optimal meat consumption in people with specific medical conditions.
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  • Intake of food rich in saturated fat in relation to subclinical atherosclerosis and potential modulating effects from single genetic variants
    Federica Laguzzi, Buamina Maitusong, Rona J. Strawbridge, Damiano Baldassarre, Fabrizio Veglia, Steve E. Humphries, Rainer Rauramaa, Sudhir Kurl, Andries J. Smit, Philippe Giral, Angela Silveira, Elena Tremoli, Anders Hamsten, Ulf de Faire, Bruna Gigante,
    Scientific Reports.2021;[Epub]     CrossRef
  • The Relationship Between Dietary Choices and Health and Premature Vascular Ageing
    Ioana Mozos, Daniela Jianu, Dana Stoian, Costin Mozos, Cristina Gug, Marius Pricop, Otilia Marginean, Constantin Tudor Luca
    Heart, Lung and Circulation.2021; 30(11): 1647.     CrossRef
  • Relation between the Total Diet Quality based on Korean Healthy Eating Index and the Incidence of Metabolic Syndrome Constituents and Metabolic Syndrome among a Prospective Cohort of Korean Adults
    Saerom Shin, Seungmin Lee
    Korean Journal of Community Nutrition.2020; 25(1): 61.     CrossRef
  • Association between Total Diet Quality and Metabolic Syndrome Incidence Risk in a Prospective Cohort of Korean Adults
    Saerom Shin, Seungmin Lee
    Clinical Nutrition Research.2019; 8(1): 46.     CrossRef
  • Red meat consumption and cardiovascular target organ damage (from the Strong Heart Study)
    Bernhard Haring, Wenyu Wang, Amanda Fretts, Daichi Shimbo, Elisa T. Lee, Barbara V. Howard, Mary J. Roman, Richard B. Devereux
    Journal of Hypertension.2017; 35(9): 1794.     CrossRef
  • The Strong Heart Study
    José R. Banegas, Fernando Rodríguez-Artalejo
    Journal of Hypertension.2017; 35(9): 1782.     CrossRef
  • Association between Nitrogen Stable Isotope Ratios in Human Hair and Serum Levels of Leptin
    Song Vogue Ahn, Sang-Baek Koh, Kwang-Sik Lee, Yeon-Sik Bong, Jong-Ku Park
    The Tohoku Journal of Experimental Medicine.2017; 243(2): 133.     CrossRef
  • The association between carbon and nitrogen stable isotope ratios of human hair and metabolic syndrome
    Jong-Ku Park, Song Vogue Ahn, Mi Kyung Kim, Kwang-Sik Lee, Sang-Baek Koh, Yeon-Sik Bong
    Clinica Chimica Acta.2015; 450: 72.     CrossRef
  • Mediterranean diet and carotid atherosclerosis in the Northern Manhattan Study
    Hannah Gardener, Clinton B. Wright, Digna Cabral, Nikolaos Scarmeas, Yian Gu, Ken Cheung, Mitchell S.V. Elkind, Ralph L. Sacco, Tatjana Rundek
    Atherosclerosis.2014; 234(2): 303.     CrossRef
  • Association Between Serum Uric Acid Level and Metabolic Syndrome
    Ju-Mi Lee, Hyeon Chang Kim, Hye Min Cho, Sun Min Oh, Dong Phil Choi, Il Suh
    Journal of Preventive Medicine and Public Health.2012; 45(3): 181.     CrossRef
Evaluation Studies
C-reactive Protein and Carotid Intima-media Thickness in a Population of Middle-aged Koreans.
Mina Suh, Joo Young Lee, Song Vogue Ahn, Hyeon Chang Kim, Il Suh
J Prev Med Public Health. 2009;42(1):29-34.
DOI: https://doi.org/10.3961/jpmph.2009.42.1.29
  • 5,323 View
  • 55 Download
  • 3 Crossref
AbstractAbstract PDF
OBJECTIVES
This study was performed to evaluate the relationship between C-reactive protein (CRP) and carotid intima-media thickness (carotid IMT) in a population of middle-aged Koreans. METHODS: A total of 1,054 men and 1,595 women (aged 40-70 years) from Kanghwa County, Korea, were chosen for the present study between 2006 and 2007. We measured high-sensitivity CRP and other major cardiovascular risk factors including anthropometrics, blood pressure, blood chemistry, and carotid ultrasonography. Health related questionnaires were also completed by each study participant. Carotid IMT value was determined by the maximal IMT at each common carotid artery. The relationship between CRP level and carotid IMT was assessed using multiple linear and logistic regression models after adjustment for age, body mass index, menopause (women), systolic blood pressure, total/HDL cholesterol ratio, triglyceride level, fasting glucose, smoking, and alcohol consumption. RESULTS: Mean carotid IMT values from the lowest to highest quartile of CRP were 0.828, 0.873, 0.898, and 0.926 mm for women (p for trend<0.001), and 0.929, 0.938, 0.949, and 0.979 mm for men (p for trend=0.032), respectively. After adjustment for major cardiovascular risk factors, the relationship between CRP and carotid IMT was significant in women (p for trend=0.017), but not in men (p for trend=0.798). Similarly, adjusted odds ratio of increased IMT, defined as the sex-specific top quartile, for the highest versus lowest CRP quartiles was 1.55 (95% CI=1.06-2.26) in women, but only 1.05 (95% CI=0.69-1.62) in men. CONCLUSIONS: CRP and carotid IMT levels appear to be directly related in women, but not in men.
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  • Hematocrit Values Predict Carotid Intimal-Media Thickness in Obese Patients With Non-Alcoholic Fatty Liver Disease: A Cross-Sectional Study
    Giovanni Tarantino, Luigi Barrea, Domenico Capone, Vincenzo Citro, Teresa Mosca, Silvia Savastano
    Frontiers in Endocrinology.2018;[Epub]     CrossRef
  • Association Between Serum Uric Acid Level and Metabolic Syndrome
    Ju-Mi Lee, Hyeon Chang Kim, Hye Min Cho, Sun Min Oh, Dong Phil Choi, Il Suh
    Journal of Preventive Medicine and Public Health.2012; 45(3): 181.     CrossRef
  • Relationships between high-sensitive C-reactive protein and markers of arterial stiffness in hypertensive patients. Differences by sex
    Manuel A Gomez-Marcos, Jose I Recio-Rodríguez, Maria C Patino-Alonso, Cristina Agudo-Conde, Leticia Gomez-Sanchez, Emiliano Rodriguez-Sanchez, Marta Gomez-Sanchez, Vicente Martinez-Vizcaino, Luis Garcia-Ortiz
    BMC Cardiovascular Disorders.2012;[Epub]     CrossRef
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Impact of Multiple Cardiovascular Risk Factors on the Carotid Intima-media Thickness in Young Adults: The Kangwha Study.
Hoo Sun Chang, Hyeon Chang Kim, Song Vogue Ahn, Nam Wook Hur, Il Suh
J Prev Med Public Health. 2007;40(5):411-417.
DOI: https://doi.org/10.3961/jpmph.2007.40.5.411
  • 4,719 View
  • 31 Download
  • 6 Crossref
AbstractAbstract PDF
OBJECTIVES
Although risk factors for coronary artery disease are also associated with increased carotid intima-media thickness (IMT), there is little information available on the asymptomatic, young adult population. We examined the association between multiple cardiovascular risk factors and the common carotid IMT in 280 young Korean adults. METHODS: The data used for this study was obtained from 280 subjects (130 men and 150 women) aged 25 years who participated in the Kangwha Study follow-up examination in 2005. We measured cardiovascular risk factors, including anthropometrics, blood pressure, blood chemistry, carotid ultrasonography, and reviewed questionnaires on health behaviors. Risk factors were defined as values above the sex-specific 75th percentile of systolic blood pressure, body mass index, total cholesterol/high-density lipoprotein cholesterol ratio, fasting blood glucose and smoking status. RESULTS: The mean carotid IMT+/-standard deviation observed was 0.683+/-0.079 mm in men and 0.678+/-0.067 mm in women (p=0.567) and the evidence of plaque was not observed in any individuals. Mean carotid IMT increased with an increasing number of risk factors(p for trend <0.001) and carotid IMT values were 0.665 mm, 0.674 mm, 0.686 mm, 0.702 mm, and 0.748 mm for 0, 1, 2, 3, and 4 to 5 risk factors, respectively. The odds ratio for having the top quartile carotid IMT in men with 3 or more risk factors versus 0-2 risk factors was 5.09 (95% CI, 2.05-12.64). CONCLUSIONS: Current findings indicate the need for prevention and control of cardiovascular risk factors in young adults and more focus on those with multiple cardiovascular risk factors.
Summary

Citations

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  • Association Between Risk Factors in Childhood and Sex Differences in Prevalence of Carotid Artery Plaques and Intima‐Media Thickness in Mid‐Adulthood in the Childhood Determinants of Adult Health Study
    Mohammad Shah, Marie‐Jeanne Buscot, Jing Tian, Hoang T. Phan, Brooklyn J. Fraser, Thomas H. Marwick, Terence Dwyer, Alison Venn, Seana Gall
    Journal of the American Heart Association.2023;[Epub]     CrossRef
  • Association between Fibrinogen and Carotid Atherosclerosis According to Smoking Status in a Korean Male Population
    Hye Min Cho, Dae Ryong Kang, Hyeon Chang Kim, Sun Min Oh, Byeong-Keuk Kim, Il Suh
    Yonsei Medical Journal.2015; 56(4): 921.     CrossRef
  • Myocardial perfusion and intima-media thickness in patients with subclinical hypothyroidism
    M Knapp, A Lisowska, B Sobkowicz, A Tycińska, R Sawicki, WJ Musiał
    Advances in Medical Sciences.2013; 58(1): 44.     CrossRef
  • Association between Depressive Symptoms and Bone Stiffness Index in Young Adults: The Kangwha Study
    Sun Min Oh, Hyeon Chang Kim, Kyoung Min Kim, Song Vogue Ahn, Dong Phil Choi, Il Suh, Chih-Hsin Tang
    PLoS ONE.2013; 8(7): e69929.     CrossRef
  • The importance of intima-media thickness (IMT) measurements in monitoring of atherosclerosis progress after myocardial infarction
    A Lisowska, M Knapp, S Bolińska, P Lisowski, A Krajewska, B Sobkowicz, WJ Musiał
    Advances in Medical Sciences.2012; 57(1): 112.     CrossRef
  • Association between Blood Pressure and Carotid Intima-Media Thickness
    Sun Min Lim, Hyeon Chang Kim, Hoon Sang Lee, Joo Young Lee, Mina Suh, Song Vogue Ahn
    The Journal of Pediatrics.2009; 154(5): 667.     CrossRef
English Abstract
Associations between Carotid Intima-media Thickness, Plaque and Cardiovascular Risk Factors.
Young Hoon Lee, Lian Hua Cui, Min Ho Shin, Sun Seog Kweon, Kyeong Soo Park, Seul Ki Jeong, Eun Kyung Chung, Jin Su Choi
J Prev Med Public Health. 2006;39(6):477-484.
  • 2,820 View
  • 69 Download
AbstractAbstract PDF
OBJECTIVES
This study was conducted to examine the association between the carotid artery intima-media thickness (IMT), plaque and cardiovascular risk factors according to gender and age. METHODS: The data used for this study were obtained from 1,507 subjects (691 men, 816 women), aged 20-74 years, who participated in 'Prevalence study of thyroid diseases' in two counties of Jeollanam-do Province during July and August of 2004. The body mass index (BMI) and waist hip ratio (WHR) were calculated by anthropometry. The blood pressure, pulse rate, pulse pressure, total cholesterol, triglyceride, HDL cholesterol and fasting blood sugar level were also measured. Ultrasonography was used to measure the carotid artery IMT and plaque. IMT measurements were performed at 6 sites, including both common carotid arteries, and the bulb and internal carotid arteries. The definition of the 'mean IMT' was mean value obtained from these 6 sites. RESULTS: The mean+/-standard deviation IMT values were 0.65+/-0.14 and 0.60+/-0.13 mm in men and women (p<0.001), respectively. The data were analyzed according to gender and the 50 year age groups.In a multiple linear regression analysis, age and hypertension were positively associated with the mean IMT in both men and women, aged<50 years. Age, total cholesterol and smoking (current) were positively associated with the mean IMT in men (> of =50 years). Age was positively associated with the mean IMT in women (> of =50 years), but the HDL cholesterol level was negatively associated. The prevalence of plaques was 44.2%(196/443) in men and 19.4%(89/459) in women, for those greater than 50 years of age. In a multiple logistic regression analysis, age (OR=1.090, 95%CI=1.053-1.129), HDL cholesterol (OR=0.964, 95%CI=0.944-0.984), total cholesterol (OR=1.009, 95%CI=1.002-1.017) and BMI (OR=0.896, 95%CI=0.818-0.983) were independently associated with plaques in men; whereas, age (OR=1.057, 95%CI=1.012-1.103), HDL cholesterol (OR=0.959, 95%CI=0.932-0.986), pulse pressure (OR=1.029, 95%CI=1.007-1.050) and triglycerides (OR=0.531, 95%CI=0.300-0.941) were independently associated with plaques in women. CONCLUSIONS: There were significant gender and aging differences in the association between the IMT, plaque and cardiovascular risk factors. Therefore, for the prevention of atherosclerosis, selective approaches should be considered with regard to gender and age factors.
Summary

JPMPH : Journal of Preventive Medicine and Public Health