Skip Navigation
Skip to contents

JPMPH : Journal of Preventive Medicine and Public Health

OPEN ACCESS
SEARCH
Search

Search

Page Path
HOME > Search
5 "C-reactive protein"
Filter
Filter
Article category
Keywords
Publication year
Authors
Funded articles
Original Articles
C-reactive Protein Concentration Is Associated With a Higher Risk of Mortality in a Rural Korean Population
Jung Hyun Lee, Hyungseon Yeom, Hyeon Chang Kim, Il Suh, Mi Kyung Kim, Min-Ho Shin, Dong Hoon Shin, Sang-Baek Koh, Song Vogue Ahn, Tae-Yong Lee, So Yeon Ryu, Jae-Sok Song, Hong-Soon Choe, Young-Hoon Lee, Bo Youl Choi
J Prev Med Public Health. 2016;49(5):275-287.   Published online August 23, 2016
DOI: https://doi.org/10.3961/jpmph.16.025
  • 9,295 View
  • 201 Download
  • 4 Crossref
AbstractAbstract PDFSupplementary Material
Objectives
C-reactive protein (CRP), an inflammatory biomarker, has been widely used as a preclinical marker predictive of morbidity and mortality. Although many studies have reported a positive association between CRP and mortality, uncertainty still remains about this association in various populations, especially in rural Korea.
Methods
A total of 23 233 middle-aged participants (8862 men and 14 371 women) who were free from cardiovascular disease, cancer, and acute inflammation (defined by a CRP level ≥10 mg/L) were drawn from 11 rural communities in Korea between 2005 and 2011. Blood CRP concentration was analyzed as a categorical variable (low: 0.0-0.9 mg/L; intermediate: 1.0-3.0 mg/L; high: 3.1-9.9 mg/L) as well as a continuous variable. Each participant’s vital status through December 2013 was confirmed by death statistics from the National Statistical Office. Cox proportional hazard models were used to assess the independent association between CRP and mortality after adjusting for other risk factors.
Results
The total quantity of observed person-years was 57 975 for men and 95 146 for women, and the number of deaths was 649 among men and 367 among women. Compared to the low-CRP group, the adjusted hazard ratio for all-cause mortality of the intermediate group was 1.17 (95% confidence interval [CI], 0.98 to 1.40) for men and 1.27 (95% CI, 1.01 to 1.61) for women, and the corresponding values for the high-CRP group were 1.98 (95% CI, 1.61 to 2.42) for men and 1.41 (95% CI, 1.03 to 1.95) for women. Similar trends were found for CRP evaluated as a continuous variable and for cardiovascular mortality.
Conclusions
Higher CRP concentrations were associated with higher mortality in a rural Korean population, and this association was more prominent in men than in women.
Summary

Citations

Citations to this article as recorded by  
  • Binary cutpoint and the combined effect of systolic and diastolic blood pressure on cardiovascular disease mortality: A community-based cohort study
    Ju-Yeun Lee, Ji Hoon Hong, Sangjun Lee, Seokyung An, Aesun Shin, Sue K. Park, Tariq Jamal Siddiqi
    PLOS ONE.2022; 17(6): e0270510.     CrossRef
  • Association of serum high-sensitivity C reactive protein with risk of mortality in an Asian population: the Health Examinees cohort
    Sang-Ah Lee, Sung Ok Kwon, Hyerim Park, Xiao-Ou Shu, Jong-Koo Lee, Daehee Kang
    BMJ Open.2022; 12(7): e052630.     CrossRef
  • Associations of C-reactive protein and fibrinogen with mortality from all-causes, cardiovascular disease and cancer among U.S. adults
    Junxiu Liu, Yanan Zhang, Carl J. Lavie, Fred K. Tabung, Jiting Xu, Qingwei Hu, Lixia He, Yunxiang Zhang
    Preventive Medicine.2020; 139: 106044.     CrossRef
  • Sex differences in the association between self-rated health and high-sensitivity C-reactive protein levels in Koreans: a cross-sectional study using data from the Korea National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey
    Se-Won Park, Seong-Sik Park, Eun-Jung Kim, Won-Suk Sung, In-Hyuk Ha, Boyoung Jung
    Health and Quality of Life Outcomes.2020;[Epub]     CrossRef
Interaction of Vitamin D and Smoking on Inflammatory Markers in the Urban Elderly
Hyemi Lee, Kyoung-Nam Kim, Youn-Hee Lim, Yun-Chul Hong
J Prev Med Public Health. 2015;48(5):249-256.   Published online September 17, 2015
DOI: https://doi.org/10.3961/jpmph.15.042
  • 9,987 View
  • 133 Download
  • 12 Crossref
AbstractAbstract PDFSupplementary Material
Objectives
Epidemiological studies have reported that vitamin D deficiency is associated with inflammatory disease. Smoking is a well-known risk factor for inflammation. However, few studies have investigated the interactive effect of vitamin D deficiency and smoking on inflammation. This study aims to investigate the interaction of vitamin D and smoking with inflammatory markers in the urban elderly.
Methods
We used data from the Korean Elderly Environmental Panel Study, which began in August 2008 and ended in August 2010, and included 560 Koreans ≥60 years old living in Seoul. Data was collected via questionnaires that included items about smoking status at the first visit. Vitamin D levels, high-sensitivity C-reactive protein (hs-CRP), and white blood cell (WBC) counts were repeatedly measured up to three times.
Results
The association of vitamin D and hs-CRP was significant after adjusting for known confounders (β=-0.080, p=0.041). After separate analysis by smoking status, the association of vitamin D deficiency and hs-CRP in smokers was stronger than that in nonsmokers (smokers: β=-0.375, p=0.013; non-smokers: β=-0.060, p=0.150). Smoking status was an effect modifier that changed the association between vitamin D deficiency and hs-CRP (interaction estimate: β=-0.254, p=0.032). Vitamin D was not significantly associated with WBC count (β=0.003, p=0.805).
Conclusions
Vitamin D deficiency was associated with hs-CRP in the urban elderly. Smoking status was an effect modifier of this association. Vitamin D deficiency was not significantly associated with WBC count.
Summary

Citations

Citations to this article as recorded by  
  • Identification of trans-genus biomarkers for early diagnosis of intestinal schistosomiasis and progression of gut pathology in a mouse model using metabolomics
    Peerut Chienwichai, Phornpimon Tipthara, Joel Tarning, Yanin Limpanont, Phiraphol Chusongsang, Yupa Chusongsang, Nuttapohn Kiangkoo, Poom Adisakwattana, Onrapak Reamtong, Gabriel Rinaldi
    PLOS Neglected Tropical Diseases.2024; 18(2): e0011966.     CrossRef
  • Vitamin D Status of People 3 to 79 Years of Age from the Canadian Health Measures Survey 2012–2019
    Hope A. Weiler, Kurtis Sarafin, Chantal Martineau, Janice L. Daoust, Krista Esslinger, Linda S. Greene-Finestone, Lidia Loukine, Veronique Dorais
    The Journal of Nutrition.2023; 153(4): 1150.     CrossRef
  • Analysis of different risk factors of hospitalized COVID-19 patients from North-Eastern Bangladesh
    Mohammad Golam Rob Mahmud, Md. Toasin Hossain Aunkor, Fatima Rahman, Darimi Hasin, Jilwatun Noor, Md. Faruque Miah
    Journal of Clinical and Experimental Investigations.2023; 14(3): em00818.     CrossRef
  • C-Reactive Protein: Pathophysiology, Diagnosis, False Test Results and a Novel Diagnostic Algorithm for Clinicians
    Dimitra S. Mouliou
    Diseases.2023; 11(4): 132.     CrossRef
  • Adiposity is a confounding factor which largely explains the association of serum vitamin D concentrations with C-reactive protein, leptin and adiponectin
    Rachida Rafiq, Hassana El Haddaoui, Renée de Mutsert, Frits R. Rosendaal, Pieter S. Hiemstra, Christa M. Cobbaert, Martin den Heijer, Renate T. de Jongh
    Cytokine.2020; 131: 155104.     CrossRef
  • The contribution of secondhand tobacco smoke exposure to pediatric multiple sclerosis risk
    Amy M Lavery, Bradley N Collins, Amy T Waldman, Chantelle N Hart, Amit Bar-Or, Ruth Ann Marrie, Douglas Arnold, Julia O’Mahony, Brenda Banwell
    Multiple Sclerosis Journal.2019; 25(4): 515.     CrossRef
  • A Review of the Potential Benefits of Increasing Vitamin D Status in Mongolian Adults through Food Fortification and Vitamin D Supplementation
    William B. Grant, Barbara J. Boucher
    Nutrients.2019; 11(10): 2452.     CrossRef
  • Relationship between serum vitamin D levels and inflammatory markers in acute stroke patients
    Qiongzhang Wang, Zhuoying Zhu, Yuntao Liu, Xinjie Tu, Jincai He
    Brain and Behavior.2018;[Epub]     CrossRef
  • Prevalence of vitamin D deficiency and its associated factors among the urban elderly population in Hyderabad metropolitan city, South India
    Palla Suryanarayana, Nimmathota Arlappa, Vadakattu Sai Santhosh, Nagalla Balakrishna, Pondey Lakshmi Rajkumar, Undrajavarapu Prasad, Banavath Bhoja Raju, Kommula Shivakeseva, Kondru Divya Shoshanni, Madabushi Seshacharyulu, Jagjeevan Babu Geddam, Prabhaka
    Annals of Human Biology.2018; 45(2): 133.     CrossRef
  • Relationship between vitamin D status and leukocytes in hospitalised cats
    Helen F Titmarsh, Jennifer A Cartwright, Scott Kilpatrick, Donna Gaylor, Elspeth M Milne, Jacqueline L Berry, Nicholas X Bommer, Danièlle Gunn-Moore, Nicola Reed, Ian Handel, Richard J Mellanby
    Journal of Feline Medicine and Surgery.2017; 19(4): 364.     CrossRef
  • Vitamin D Status and Gestational Diabetes: Effect of Smoking Status during Pregnancy
    Linda Dodds, Christy G. Woolcott, Hope Weiler, Anne Spencer, Jean‐Claude Forest, B. Anthony Armson, Yves Giguère
    Paediatric and Perinatal Epidemiology.2016; 30(3): 229.     CrossRef
  • Modification of the association between smoking status and severity of coronary stenosis by vitamin D in patients suspected of coronary heart disease
    Kuibao Li, Xiyan Yang, Lefeng Wang, Mulei Chen, Wenshu Zhao, Li Xu, Xinchun Yang
    Medicine.2016; 95(36): e4817.     CrossRef
Evaluation Studies
C-reactive Protein and Carotid Intima-media Thickness in a Population of Middle-aged Koreans.
Mina Suh, Joo Young Lee, Song Vogue Ahn, Hyeon Chang Kim, Il Suh
J Prev Med Public Health. 2009;42(1):29-34.
DOI: https://doi.org/10.3961/jpmph.2009.42.1.29
  • 5,323 View
  • 55 Download
  • 3 Crossref
AbstractAbstract PDF
OBJECTIVES
This study was performed to evaluate the relationship between C-reactive protein (CRP) and carotid intima-media thickness (carotid IMT) in a population of middle-aged Koreans. METHODS: A total of 1,054 men and 1,595 women (aged 40-70 years) from Kanghwa County, Korea, were chosen for the present study between 2006 and 2007. We measured high-sensitivity CRP and other major cardiovascular risk factors including anthropometrics, blood pressure, blood chemistry, and carotid ultrasonography. Health related questionnaires were also completed by each study participant. Carotid IMT value was determined by the maximal IMT at each common carotid artery. The relationship between CRP level and carotid IMT was assessed using multiple linear and logistic regression models after adjustment for age, body mass index, menopause (women), systolic blood pressure, total/HDL cholesterol ratio, triglyceride level, fasting glucose, smoking, and alcohol consumption. RESULTS: Mean carotid IMT values from the lowest to highest quartile of CRP were 0.828, 0.873, 0.898, and 0.926 mm for women (p for trend<0.001), and 0.929, 0.938, 0.949, and 0.979 mm for men (p for trend=0.032), respectively. After adjustment for major cardiovascular risk factors, the relationship between CRP and carotid IMT was significant in women (p for trend=0.017), but not in men (p for trend=0.798). Similarly, adjusted odds ratio of increased IMT, defined as the sex-specific top quartile, for the highest versus lowest CRP quartiles was 1.55 (95% CI=1.06-2.26) in women, but only 1.05 (95% CI=0.69-1.62) in men. CONCLUSIONS: CRP and carotid IMT levels appear to be directly related in women, but not in men.
Summary

Citations

Citations to this article as recorded by  
  • Hematocrit Values Predict Carotid Intimal-Media Thickness in Obese Patients With Non-Alcoholic Fatty Liver Disease: A Cross-Sectional Study
    Giovanni Tarantino, Luigi Barrea, Domenico Capone, Vincenzo Citro, Teresa Mosca, Silvia Savastano
    Frontiers in Endocrinology.2018;[Epub]     CrossRef
  • Association Between Serum Uric Acid Level and Metabolic Syndrome
    Ju-Mi Lee, Hyeon Chang Kim, Hye Min Cho, Sun Min Oh, Dong Phil Choi, Il Suh
    Journal of Preventive Medicine and Public Health.2012; 45(3): 181.     CrossRef
  • Relationships between high-sensitive C-reactive protein and markers of arterial stiffness in hypertensive patients. Differences by sex
    Manuel A Gomez-Marcos, Jose I Recio-Rodríguez, Maria C Patino-Alonso, Cristina Agudo-Conde, Leticia Gomez-Sanchez, Emiliano Rodriguez-Sanchez, Marta Gomez-Sanchez, Vicente Martinez-Vizcaino, Luis Garcia-Ortiz
    BMC Cardiovascular Disorders.2012;[Epub]     CrossRef
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
The Association Between Circulating Inflammatory Markers and Metabolic Syndrome in Korean Rural Adults.
So Yeon Ryu, Ki Soon Kim, Jong Park, Myeng Guen Kang, Mi Ah Han
J Prev Med Public Health. 2008;41(6):413-418.
DOI: https://doi.org/10.3961/jpmph.2008.41.6.413
  • 5,755 View
  • 70 Download
  • 13 Crossref
AbstractAbstract PDF
OBJECTIVES
This study was performed to investigate the associations between the metabolic syndrome (MetS) and inflammatory markers. METHODS: This cross-sectional analysis was performed using data from 1578 Koreans aged 40-69 years residing in a rural area. We investigated associations between MetS and circulating high sensitivity C-reactive protein (hs-CRP), white blood cells (WBC) and adiponectin. MetS was defined using the criteria proposed by the National Cholesterol Education Program Adult Treatment Panel III (ATP-III). RESULTS: Increased WBC counts and hs-CRP levels and decreased adiponectin levels were observed in subjects with MetS. WBC, hs-CRP and adiponectin levels linearly deteriorated with an increase in the number of MetS components (all ptrend <0.005). Finally, adjusted odds ratios (ORs) for the risk of MetS by increase/decrease in 3 inflammatory markers were calculated by multivariate logistic regression analyses. In terms of changes in inflammation markers, in men, the adjusted ORs (95% confidence interval) were 1.15 (1.01-1.31) for WBC, 1.64 (1.02-2.64) for hs-CRP, and 0.19 (0.08-0.45) for adiponectin, whereas corresponding adjusted ORs (95% CIs) in women were 1.27 (1.15-1.40), 0.98 (0.67-1.42), 0.09 (0.04-0.18), respectively. CONCLUSIONS: Serum adiponectin levels and WBC counts were found to be strongly associated with MetS in both sexes. However, hs-CRP lost its significance after adjusting for BMI and other inflammatory markers in women. This study shows that inflammatory response is associated with MetS in the Korean population. Further prospective studies are necessary to confirm the contribution made by inflammatory markers to the development of MetS.
Summary

Citations

Citations to this article as recorded by  
  • Associations of Insulin Resistance and High-Sensitivity C-Reactive Protein with Metabolic Abnormalities in Korean Patients with Type 2 Diabetes Mellitus: A Preliminary Study
    Yuchul Jeong, Beom Jun Lee, Wonjai Hur, Minjoon Lee, Se-Hyeon Han
    Metabolites.2024; 14(7): 371.     CrossRef
  • Acute phase proteins levels in horses, after a single carbohydrate overload, associated with cecal alkalinization
    Isabela Peixoto Rabelo, Vanessa Barroco de Paula, Caio Carvalho Bustamante, André Marcos Santana, Daniela Gomes da Silva, Amanda Cristina Baldassi, Paulo Aléscio Canola, Carlos Augusto Araújo Valadão
    Frontiers in Veterinary Science.2023;[Epub]     CrossRef
  • Inflammatory Markers and Atherogenic Coefficient: Early Markers of Metabolic Syndrome
    Marjan Mahdavi-Roshan, Nargeskhatoon Shoaibinobarian, Morvarid Noormohammadi, Aboozar Fakhr Mousavi, Amir Savar Rakhsh, Arsalan Salari, Zeinab Ghorbani
    International Journal of Endocrinology and Metabolism.2022;[Epub]     CrossRef
  • Association between C-Reactive Protein and Metabolic Syndrome in Korean Adults
    Youhyun Song, Soo Kyung Yang, Jungeun Kim, Duk-Chul Lee
    Korean Journal of Family Medicine.2019; 40(2): 116.     CrossRef
  • Prospective cohort study evaluating risk factors for the development of pasture‐associated laminitis in the United Kingdom
    N. J. Menzies‐Gow, P. A. Harris, J. Elliott
    Equine Veterinary Journal.2017; 49(3): 300.     CrossRef
  • The Relationship between Chronic Rhinosinusitis and Metabolic Syndrome
    Eun Jung Lee, Hye Jin Hwang, Chan Min Jung, Min Ki Kim, Min Seok Kang, Kyung-Su Kim
    American Journal of Rhinology & Allergy.2017; 31(4): 222.     CrossRef
  • Biomarkers of Metabolic Syndrome: Biochemical Background and Clinical Significance
    Harry Robberecht, Nina Hermans
    Metabolic Syndrome and Related Disorders.2016; 14(2): 47.     CrossRef
  • Incremental Predictive Value of Serum AST-to-ALT Ratio for Incident Metabolic Syndrome: The ARIRANG Study
    Dhananjay Yadav, Eunhee Choi, Song Vogue Ahn, Soon Koo Baik, Youn zoo Cho, Sang Baek Koh, Ji Hye Huh, Yoosoo Chang, Ki-Chul Sung, Jang Young Kim, Sheng-Nan Lu
    PLOS ONE.2016; 11(8): e0161304.     CrossRef
  • In prehypertension leukocytosis is associated with body mass index but not with blood pressure or incident hypertension
    Stevo Julius, Brent M. Egan, Niko A. Kaciroti, Shawna D. Nesbitt, Andrew K. Chen
    Journal of Hypertension.2014; 32(2): 251.     CrossRef
  • Circulating high-sensitivity C-reactive protein and soluble CD40 ligand are inter-related in a cohort of women with polycystic ovary syndrome
    H.O. El-Mesallamy, R.S. Abd El-Razek, T.A. El-Refaie
    European Journal of Obstetrics & Gynecology and Reproductive Biology.2013; 168(2): 178.     CrossRef
  • Metabolic syndrome and inflammatory biomarkers: a community-based cross-sectional study at the Framingham Heart Study
    Dhayana Dallmeier, Martin G Larson, Ramachandran S Vasan, John F Keaney, Joao D Fontes, James B Meigs, Caroline S Fox, Emelia J Benjamin
    Diabetology & Metabolic Syndrome.2012;[Epub]     CrossRef
  • Adiponectin reduces C-reactive protein expression and downregulates STAT3 phosphorylation induced by IL-6 in HepG2 cells
    Haiyun Sun, Yingnan Zhang, Ping Gao, Qiang Li, Yuqian Sun, Jinchao Zhang, Changqing Xu
    Molecular and Cellular Biochemistry.2011; 347(1-2): 183.     CrossRef
  • Association between insulin resistance and c-reactive protein among Peruvian adults
    Bizu Gelaye, Luis Revilla, Tania Lopez, Luis Suarez, Sixto E Sanchez, Karin Hevner, Annette L Fitzpatrick, Michelle A Williams
    Diabetology & Metabolic Syndrome.2010;[Epub]     CrossRef
English Abstract
The Association of High Sensitivity C-reactive Protein (hsCRP) with Hypertension in Some Rural Residents.
Young Seon Lee, So Yeon Ryu, Jong Park, Myeong Guen Kang, Ki Soon Kim
J Prev Med Public Health. 2005;38(3):325-329.
  • 2,396 View
  • 61 Download
AbstractAbstract PDF
OBJECTIVE
This study was performed to assess the association between high sensitivity C-Reactive Protein (hsCRP) and hypertension. METHODS: We evaluated the relationship between hsCRP with hypertension and other cardiovascular risk factors, using a cross-sectional survey of 202 people over the age of 50, living in a rural area. A logistic regression analysis was used to study the association between hsCRP and hypertension. The hsCRP levels were divided in quartiles, and the odds ratios (OR), with 95% confidence intervals (95% CI), calculated, using the lowest quartile as a reference. RESULTS: The subjects consisted of 37.1% men and 62.9% women, with a mean (SD) hsCRP level of 1.9 (+/-3.0) mg/l. The overall prevalence of hypertension was 61.4%. The prevalence of hypertension according to the hsCRP quartile was not statistically significant. After adjustment for confounding variables, the prevalence of hypertension according to the subjects in the 2nd, 3rd and 4th hsCRP quartiles were 1.418 (95% CI=0.554-3.628), 1.124 (95% CI=0.392-3.214) and 0.892 (95% CI=0.312-2.547) times higher, respectively, compared to those in the 1st quartile. CONCLUSIONS: The results showed that the level of hsCRP was not a risk factor for hypertension among adults aged over 50 years, living in a rural area. A further study should be performed to find the association between hsCRP and hypertension.
Summary

JPMPH : Journal of Preventive Medicine and Public Health