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Well-being Index Scores and Subjective Health Status of Korean Healthcare Workers
Yoonhee Shin, Bohyun Park, Nam-eun Kim, Eun Jeong Choi, Minsu Ock, Sun Ha Jee, Sue K. Park, Hyeong Sik Ahn, Hyesook Park
J Prev Med Public Health. 2022;55(3):226-233.   Published online May 31, 2022
DOI: https://doi.org/10.3961/jpmph.22.114
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  • 129 Download
AbstractAbstract AbstractSummary PDF
Objectives
The aim of this study was to evaluate the subjective level of health-related quality of life of Korean healthcare workers using various quality-of-life instruments.
Methods
This study included 992 participants, who were doctors and nurses. A survey was conducted between November 28 and December 4, 2019. Data from 954 participants divided into 3 groups (physicians, residents, and nurses) were analyzed. Four measurement tools (29 questions) were used in the survey to evaluate subjective health status and well-being.
Results
In the Mayo Well-being Index, burnout during work (88.5%) and emotional difficulties caused by work (84.0%) were frequently cited by the respondents. Regarding questions on burnout and emotional difficulties, residents and nurses had the highest scores (91.0 and 89.6%, respectively). Emotional problems, such as anxiety, depression, and irritability, accounted for a high percentage (73.1%) of the total, while 82.2% of respondents reported that their work schedules interfered with their leisure and family time. There was no significant difference among the groups in subjective health status. However, 10.1% of the residents experienced very low quality of life, which was a higher proportion than that of physicians (2.7%) and nurses (5.2%).
Conclusions
The level of well-being that Korean medical workers experienced in relation to work was lower than the results of the United States healthcare workers surveyed using the same tool. This study was unique in that it conducted a subjective quality-of-life survey on Korean healthcare workers.
Summary
Korean summary
본 연구의 목적은 다양한 삶의 질 도구를 사용하여 한국 의료종사자들의 건강과 관련된 삶의 질에 대한 주관적인 수준을 평가하는 것이다. 피로와 정서적 어려움, 업무로 인한 일상생활의 방해 등 한국 의료종사자의 일부 삶의 질 점수가 낮았다. 의료 종사자의 소진 경험이 환자의 치료에 부정적인 영향을 미친다는 것을 고려할 때 의료 종사자들의 삶의 질을 향상시키는 정책이 마련되어야하며, 건강과 관련된 직업적 위험요인 연구도 추가적으로 필요하다.
Measuring the Burden of Disease in Korea, 2008-2018
Yoon-Sun Jung, Young-Eun Kim, Hyesook Park, In-Hwan Oh, Min-Woo Jo, Minsu Ock, Dun-Sol Go, Seok-Jun Yoon
J Prev Med Public Health. 2021;54(5):293-300.   Published online September 30, 2021
DOI: https://doi.org/10.3961/jpmph.21.478
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  • 414 Download
  • 23 Web of Science
  • 29 Crossref
AbstractAbstract AbstractSummary PDFSupplementary Material
The study aims to examine the current status and differences in the burden of disease in Korea during 2008-2018. We calculated the burden of disease for Koreans from 2008 to 2018 using an incidence-based approach. Disability adjusted life years (DALYs) were expressed in units per 100 000 population by adding years of life lost (YLLs) and years lived with disability (YLDs). DALY calculation results were presented by gender, age group, disease, region, and income level. To explore differences in DALYs by region and income level, we used administrative district and insurance premium information from the National Health Insurance Service claims data. The burden of disease among Koreans showed an increasing trend from 2008 to 2018. By 2017, the burden of disease among men was higher than that among women. Diabetes mellitus, low back pain, and chronic lower respiratory disease were ranked high in the burden of disease; the sum of DALY rates for these diseases accounted for 18.4% of the total burden of disease among Koreans in 2018. The top leading causes associated with a high burden of disease differed slightly according to gender, age group, and income level. In this study, we measured the health status of Koreans and differences in the population health level according to gender, age group, region, and income level. This data can be used as an indicator of health equity, and the results derived from this study can be used to guide community-centered (or customized) health promotion policies and projects, and for setting national health policy goals.
Summary
Korean summary
이 논문에서는 장애보정생존년수라는 지표를 활용하여 2008-2018년 한국인의 질병부담 산출결과를 제시하였으며, 성별·연령군별·질환별 질병부담 수준의 차이 뿐만 아니라 지역 및 소득수준의 사회경제적 수준에 따른 질병부담의 격차도 함께 제시하였다.

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Original Article
Associations of Ambient Air Pollutant Concentrations With Respiratory Symptoms and Perceived Health Status in Japanese Adults With and Without Chronic Respiratory Diseases: A Panel Study
Motoyuki Nakao, Keiko Yamauchi, Satoshi Mitsuma, Tetsuro Odaira, Hideto Obata, Yoichi Chijimatsu, Yoko Ishihara
J Prev Med Public Health. 2019;52(6):416-426.   Published online November 13, 2019
DOI: https://doi.org/10.3961/jpmph.19.180
  • 5,969 View
  • 99 Download
  • 3 Crossref
AbstractAbstract PDFSupplementary Material
Objectives
In recent years, transboundary air pollution from mainland East Asia has led to growing concerns about air pollution in Japan. Air pollution is reportedly associated with the exacerbation of respiratory diseases. In this study, we assessed the effects of air pollution on respiratory symptoms and the health status of participants with and without chronic respiratory diseases.
Methods
Participants (n=2753) with and without chronic respiratory diseases who visited healthcare facilities in Japan during February from 2010 to 2015 filled out a self-report questionnaire regarding their symptoms and perceived health status. Participants were followed up during April-May and June-July.
Results
Oxidant concentrations were associated with respiratory symptoms, overall health, and quality of life (QoL). Suspended particulate matter (SPM) and particulate matter <2.5 μm levels were associated with physical fitness; SPM was also associated with QoL. Recent experience of an Asian sand dust event had a significant effect on allergic symptoms, change in health, and QoL.
Conclusions
Respiratory symptoms were more strongly affected by oxidants than by other pollutants. Significant associations of air pollutants were found with a comprehensive range of items related to perceived health status, including overall health and QoL. Although the effects of air pollutants on respiratory symptoms and health status were more apparent among patients with respiratory diseases, the adverse effects of air pollutants were significant even among participants without such conditions.
Summary

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Review
Measurement of Socioeconomic Position in Research on Cardiovascular Health Disparities in Korea: A Systematic Review
Chi-Young Lee, Yong-Hwan Lee
J Prev Med Public Health. 2019;52(5):281-291.   Published online August 14, 2019
DOI: https://doi.org/10.3961/jpmph.19.094
  • 5,908 View
  • 183 Download
  • 4 Crossref
AbstractAbstract PDF
Objectives
The validity of instruments measuring socioeconomic position (SEP) has been a major area of concern in research on cardiovascular health disparities. The purpose of this systematic review is to identify the current status of the methods used to measure SEP in research on cardiovascular health disparities in Korea and to provide directions for future research.
Methods
Relevant articles were obtained through electronic database searches with manual searches of reference lists and no restriction on the date of publication. SEP indicators were categorized into compositional, contextual, composite, and life-course measures.
Results
Forty-eight studies published from 2003 to 2018 satisfied the review criteria. Studies utilizing compositional measures mainly relied on a limited number of SEP parameters. In addition, these measures hardly addressed the time-varying and subjective features of SEP. Finding valid contextual measures at the organizational, community, and societal levels that are appropriate to Korea’s context remains a challenge, and these are rarely modeled simultaneously. Studies have rarely focused on composite and life-course measures.
Conclusions
Future studies should develop and utilize valid compositional and contextual measures and appraise social patterns that vary across time, place, and culture using such measures. Studies should also consider multilevel influences, adding a focus on the interactions between different levels of intertwined SEP factors to advance the design of research. More attention should be given to composite and life-course measures.
Summary

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Original Articles
What Explains Socioeconomic Inequality in Health-related Quality of Life in Iran? A Blinder-Oaxaca Decomposition
Satar Rezaei, Mohammad Hajizadeh, Yahya Salimi, Ghobad Moradi, Bijan Nouri
J Prev Med Public Health. 2018;51(5):219-226.   Published online August 7, 2018
DOI: https://doi.org/10.3961/jpmph.18.012
  • 6,352 View
  • 208 Download
  • 4 Crossref
AbstractAbstract PDF
Objectives
This study aimed to explain the health-related quality of life (HRQoL) gap between the poorest and the wealthiest quintiles in the capitals of Kermanshah and Kurdistan Provinces (Kermanshah and Sanandaj), in western Iran.
Methods
This was a cross-sectional study conducted among 1772 adults. Data on socio-demographic characteristics, socioeconomic status (SES), lifestyle factors, body mass index, and HRQoL of participants were collected using a self-administered questionnaire. The slope and relative indices of inequality (SII and RII, respectively) were employed to examine socioeconomic inequality in poor HRQoL. Blinder-Oaxaca (BO) decomposition was used to quantify the contribution of explanatory variables to the gap in the prevalence of poor HRQoL between the wealthiest and the poorest groups.
Results
The overall crude and age-adjusted prevalence of poor HRQoL among adults was 32.0 and 41.8%, respectively. The SII and RII indicated that poor HRQoL was mainly concentrated among individuals with lower SES. The absolute difference (%) in the prevalence of poor HRQoL between the highest and lowest SES groups was 28.4. The BO results indicated that 49.9% of the difference was explained by different distributions of age, smoking behavior, physical inactivity, chronic health conditions, and obesity between the highest and lowest SES groups, while the remaining half of the gap was explained by the response effect.
Conclusions
We observed a pro-rich distribution of poor HRQoL among adults in the capitals of Kermanshah and Kurdistan Provinces. Policies and strategies aimed at preventing and reducing smoking, physical inactivity, chronic health conditions, and obesity among the poor may reduce the gap in poor HRQoL between the highest and lowest SES groups in Iran.
Summary

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  • Why is there a gap in self-rated health among people with hypertension in Zambia? A decomposition of determinants and rural‒urban differences
    Chris Mweemba, Wilbroad Mutale, Felix Masiye, Peter Hangoma
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The Impact of the Financial Crisis on Lifestyle Health Determinants Among Older Adults Living in the Mediterranean Region: The Multinational MEDIS Study (2005-2015)
Alexandra Foscolou, Stefanos Tyrovolas, George Soulis, Anargiros Mariolis, Suzanne Piscopo, Giuseppe Valacchi, Foteini Anastasiou, Christos Lionis, Akis Zeimbekis, Josep-Antoni Tur, Vassiliki Bountziouka, Dimitra Tyrovola, Efthimios Gotsis, George Metallinos, Antonia-Leda Matalas, Evangelos Polychronopoulos, Labros Sidossis, Demosthenes B. Panagiotakos
J Prev Med Public Health. 2017;50(1):1-9.   Published online December 19, 2016
DOI: https://doi.org/10.3961/jpmph.16.101
  • 12,163 View
  • 335 Download
  • 32 Crossref
AbstractAbstract PDF
Objectives
By the end of the 2000s, the economic situation in many European countries started to deteriorate, generating financial uncertainty, social insecurity and worse health status. The aim of the present study was to investigate how the recent financial crisis has affected the lifestyle health determinants and behaviours of older adults living in the Mediterranean islands.
Methods
From 2005 to 2015, a population-based, multi-stage convenience sampling method was used to voluntarily enrol 2749 older adults (50% men) from 20 Mediterranean islands and the rural area of the Mani peninsula. Lifestyle status was evaluated as the cumulative score of four components (range, 0 to 6), that is, smoking habits, diet quality (MedDietScore), depression status (Geriatric Depression Scale) and physical activity.
Results
Older Mediterranean people enrolled in the study from 2009 onwards showed social isolation and increased smoking, were more prone to depressive symptoms, and adopted less healthy dietary habits, as compared to their counterparts participating earlier in the study (p<0.05), irrespective of age, gender, several clinical characteristics, or socioeconomic status of the participants (an almost 50% adjusted increase in the lifestyle score from before 2009 to after 2009, p<0.001).
Conclusions
A shift towards less healthy behaviours was noticeable after the economic crisis had commenced. Public health interventions should focus on older adults, particularly of lower socioeconomic levels, in order to effectively reduce the burden of cardiometabolic disease at the population level.
Summary

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Meeting Recommended Levels of Physical Activity in Relation to Preventive Health Behavior and Health Status Among Adults
Peter D. Hart, Gabriel Benavidez, James Erickson
J Prev Med Public Health. 2017;50(1):10-17.   Published online December 19, 2016
DOI: https://doi.org/10.3961/jpmph.16.080
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AbstractAbstract PDF
Objectives
The purpose of this study was to examine the relationship of meeting the recommended levels of physical activity (PA) with health status and preventive health behavior in adults.
Methods
A total of 5630 adults 18 years of age or older were included in this study. PA was assessed using a series of questions that categorized activities based on their metabolic equivalent values and then categorized individuals based on the reported frequency and duration of such activities. Participants reporting 150 minutes or more of moderate-intensity PA per week were considered to have met the PA guidelines. Multiple logistic regression was used to model the relationships between meeting PA guidelines and health status and preventive health behavior, while controlling for confounding variables.
Results
Overall, 53.9% (95% confidence interval [CI], 51.9 to 55.9%) of adults reported meeting the recommended levels of PA. Among adults with good general health, 56.9% (95% CI, 54.7 to 59.1%) reported meeting the recommended levels of PA versus 43.1% (95% CI, 40.9 to 45.3%) who did not. Adults who met the PA guidelines were significantly more likely not to report high cholesterol, diabetes, chronic obstructive pulmonary disease, arthritis, asthma, depression, or overweight. Furthermore, adults meeting the PA guidelines were significantly more likely to report having health insurance, consuming fruits daily, consuming vegetables daily, and not being a current cigarette smoker.
Conclusions
In this study, we found meeting the current guidelines for PA to have a protective relationship with both health status and health behavior in adults. Health promotion programs should focus on strategies that help individuals meet the current guidelines of at least 150 minutes per week of moderate-intensity PA.
Summary

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Factors Determining Children’s Private Health Insurance Enrolment and Healthcare Utilization Patterns: Evidence From the 2008 to 2011 Health Panel Data
Jawoon Shin, Tae-Jin Lee, Sung-il Cho, Seung Ah Choe
J Prev Med Public Health. 2015;48(6):319-329.   Published online November 16, 2015
DOI: https://doi.org/10.3961/jpmph.15.057
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AbstractAbstract PDF
Objectives
Parental socioeconomic status (SES) exerts a substantial influence on children’s health. The purpose of this study was to examine factors determining children’s private health insurance (PHI) enrolment and children’s healthcare utilization according to PHI coverage.
Methods
Korea Health Panel data from 2011 (n=3085) was used to explore the factors determining PHI enrolment in children younger than 15 years of age. A logit model contained health status and SES variables for both children and parents. A fixed effects model identified factors influencing healthcare utilization in children aged 10 years or younger, using 2008 to 2011 panel data (n=9084).
Results
The factors determining children’s PHI enrolment included children’s age and sex and parents’ educational status, employment status, and household income quintile. PHI exerted a significant effect on outpatient cost, inpatient cost, and number of admissions. Number of outpatient visits and total length of stay were not affected by PHI status. The interaction between PHI and age group increased outpatient cost significantly.
Conclusions
Children’s PHI enrolment was influenced by parents’ SES, while healthcare utilization was affected by health and disability status. Therefore, the results of this study suggest disparities in healthcare utilization according to PHI enrollment.
Summary

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    Mohd Adli Abd Khalim, Surianti Sukeri, Gopal Ashish Sharma
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Disparities in Health Care Utilization Among Urban Homeless in South Korea: A Cross-Sectional Study
Changgyo Yoon, Young-Su Ju, Chang-yup Kim
J Prev Med Public Health. 2011;44(6):267-274.   Published online November 14, 2011
DOI: https://doi.org/10.3961/jpmph.2011.44.6.267
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AbstractAbstract PDF
Objectives

We examined health care disparities in Korean urban homeless people and individual characteristics associated with the utilization of health care.

Methods

We selected a sample of 203 homeless individuals at streets, shelters, and drop-in centers in Seoul and Daejeon by a quota sampling method. We surveyed demographic information, information related to using health care, and health status with a questionnaire. Logistic regression analysis was adopted to identify factors associated with using health care and to reveal health care disparities within the Korean urban homeless population.

Results

Among 203 respondents, 89 reported that they had visited health care providers at least once in the past 6 months. Twenty persons (22.5%) in the group that used health care (n = 89) reported feeling discriminated against. After adjustment for age, sex, marital status, educational level, monthly income, perceived health status, Beck Depression Inventory score, homeless period, and other covariates, three factors were significantly associated with medical utilization: female sex (adjusted odds ratio [aOR, 15.95; 95% CI, 3.97 to 64.04], having three or more diseases (aOR, 24.58; 95% CI, 4.23 to 142.78), and non-street residency (aOR, 11.39; 95% CI, 3.58 to 36.24).

Conclusions

Health care disparities in Seoul and Daejeon homeless exist in terms of the main place to stay, physical illnesses, and gender. Under the current homeless support system in South Korea, street homeless have poorer accessibility to health care versus non-street homeless. To provide equitable medical aid for homeless people, strategies to overcome barriers against health care for the street homeless are needed.

Summary

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    Jessica Richards, Randall Kuhn
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Analysis for the Impact of Adulthood and Childhood Socioeconomic Positions and Intergenerational Social Mobility on Adulthood Health.
Jae Hee Seo, Ho Kim, Young Jeon Shin
J Prev Med Public Health. 2010;43(2):138-150.
DOI: https://doi.org/10.3961/jpmph.2010.43.2.138
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AbstractAbstract PDF
OBJECTIVES
There are at least three conceptual models for the effects of the childhood social environment on adult health: the critical period model, the social mobility model, and the cumulative risk model. However, few studies have investigated all three different models within the same setting. This study aims to examine the impact of childhood and adulthood socioeconomic positions and intergenerational social mobility over the life course on the health in adulthood based both on the critical period model and the social mobility model. METHODS: This study was conducted on 9583 adults aged between 25 and 64 years old and they were the respondents to the Korea Welfare Panel Study (2006). A multivariate logistic regression analysis was carried out, using the critical period model and the social mobility model out of the life course approaches, to look into the impact of childhood and adulthood socioeconomic positions and intergenerational social mobility on the health status in adulthood. RESULTS: Household income and occupation out of the adulthood socioeconomic position indicators had an independent influence on the adulthood health status. The childhood socioeconomic position indicators, except for the place of childhood residence, affected the adulthood health status even after adjustment for the adulthood socioeconomic position. The effect of intergenerational social mobility was also statistically significant even after adjusting for the adulthood socioeconomic position, but it became insignificant when the childhood socioeconomic position was additionally adjusted for. CONCLUSIONS: Adulthood health is indeed affected by both the childhood and adulthood socioeconomic positions as well as intergenerational social mobility. This result shows that a life course approach needs to be adopted when dealing with health issues.
Summary

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English Abstracts
Socioeconomic Inequity in Self-Rated Health Status and Contribution of Health Behavioral Factors in Korea.
Minkyung Kim, Woojin Chung, Seungji Lim, Soojin Yoon, Jakyoung Lee, Eunkyung Kim, Lanju Ko
J Prev Med Public Health. 2010;43(1):50-61.
DOI: https://doi.org/10.3961/jpmph.2010.43.1.50
  • 5,882 View
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AbstractAbstract PDF
OBJECTIVES
The study is investigated socioeconomic variations in self-rated health status and contribution of health behavioral factors in Korea. METHODS: A nationally representative sample (2,800 men and 3,230 women aged 20-64 years) from the 2005 Korea National Health and Nutrition Surveys was analyzed using logistic regression. RESULTS: Self-rated health was lower among lower socioeconomic groups compared with higher socioeconomic groups, with gender being irrelevant. This association was attenuated when health behavioral and socio-demographic factors were adjusted. When each health behavioral factor was considered separately, mediators such as smoking in men, and stress or exercise in women explained a large part of the decreased socioeconomic health inequalities. CONCLUSIONS: In Korea, subjective health inequalities arise from different socioeconomic status, but this difference is decreased by health behavioral factors. Therefore, socioeconomic inequity in self-rated health status can be corrected more effectively by promotional health behaviors.
Summary

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Health Inequity among Waged Workers by Employment Status.
Jin Wook Bahk, Yoon Jung Han, Seung Sup Kim
J Prev Med Public Health. 2007;40(5):388-396.
DOI: https://doi.org/10.3961/jpmph.2007.40.5.388
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AbstractAbstract PDF
OBJECTIVES
The purpose of this study was to examine the relationship between the differences in employment status and self assessed health in Korea. METHODS: We analyzed 4 year follow-up data generated by the Korean Labor and Income Panel Study(KLIPS), which was conducted on 1,207 men and 582 women who had undergone a change in employment status. The study subjects were placed into 1 of the following 4 groups based on their employment history; Non-precarious workers, Precarious to non-precarious workers, Non-precarious to precarious workers and Precarious workers. Logistic regression was then used to examine the relationship between the changes in employment status and self assessed health. RESULTS: When males were considered, self assessed health was better among the precarious to non-precarious workers (OR 1.58, 95% CI=1.57-1.60) and the precarious workers (OR 1.29, 95% CI=1.28-1.30) than in the non-precarious workers, after adjusting for age, socioeconomic status (education level, occupational class, marital status, average equivalent household income and average number of hours worked per week), health behavior (smoking, drinking and exercise) and medical service access (regular medical examination, have chronic disease or hospitalized within 1 year). When female workers were considered, the precarious to non-precarious workers (OR 1.89, 95% CI=1.86-1.92), non-precarious to precarious workers(OR 1.24, 95% CI=1.23-1.26) and precarious workers (OR 1.27, 95% CI=1.25-1.28) all reported poorer health than the non-precarious workers after adjusting for the aforementioned factors. CONCLUSIONS: This study showed that changes in employment status were associated with differences in self assessed health among men and women. Specifically, the results of this study showed that a corresponding positive outcome based on self assessed health was greater for employees that changed from precarious to non-precarious jobs and for male employees with precarious jobs, whereas female employees with non-precarious jobs had higher self assessed health. However, additional longitudinal studies on the health effects of employment status should be conducted.
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    Eunsuk Choi
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    Kimin Kwon, Jae Bum Park, Kyung-Jong Lee, Yoon-Sik Cho
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    Seong Eun Kim, Yeong Sook Yoon, Yun Jun Yang, Eon Sook Lee, Jun Hyung Lee, Dong Jun Kim, Jung Il Kim, Dai Jung Yeo, Ji Yeon Lee, Eun Gyoung Song
    Korean Journal of Stress Research.2016; 24(3): 127.     CrossRef
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    H. Lim, H. Kimm, I. H. Song
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    Young Soon Choi
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    Chungah Kim, Youngtae Cho
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    Minsoo Jung
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Differential Effects of Family Income on Self-rated Health by Age: Analysis of Seoul Citizens Health Indicators Survey 2001, 2005.
Youn Jung, Youngtae Cho, Juhwan Oh
J Prev Med Public Health. 2007;40(5):381-387.
DOI: https://doi.org/10.3961/jpmph.2007.40.5.381
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AbstractAbstract PDF
OBJECTIVES
This study was conducted in order to determine how the association between socioeconomic position(SEP) and health status changes with age among Seoul residents aged 25 and over. METHODS: We utilized the 2001 and 2005 Seoul Citizens Health Indicators Surveys. We used self-rated 'poor' health status as an outcome variable, and family income as an indicator of SEP. In order to characterize the differential effects of socioeconomic position on health by age, we conducted separate multivariate analyses by 10-year age groups, controlling for sociodemographic covariates. In order to assess the relative health inequality across socioeconomic groups, we estimated the Relative Index of Inequality (RII). RESULTS: The risk of 'poor health' is significantly high in low family income groups, and this increased risk is seen at all ages. However, the magnitude of relative socioeconomic inequality in health, as measured by the odds ratio and RII, is not identical across age groups. The difference in health across income groups is small in early adulthood (ages 25-34), but increases with age until relatively late in life (ages 35-64). It then decreases among the elderly population (ages more than 65). When the RII reported in 2005 is compared to that reported in 2001, RII can be seen to have increased across all ages, with the exception of individuals aged 25-34. CONCLUSIONS: The magnitude of health inequality is the greatest during mid- to late adulthood (ages 45-64). In addition, health inequalities have worsened between 2001 and 2005 across all age groups after economic crisis.
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General Population Time Trade-off Values for 42 EQ-5D Health States in South Korea.
Min Woo Jo, Sang Il Lee
J Prev Med Public Health. 2007;40(2):169-176.
DOI: https://doi.org/10.3961/jpmph.2007.40.2.169
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  • 12 Crossref
AbstractAbstract PDF
OBJECTIVES
This study was conducted to elicit quality weights for 42 EQ-5D health states with the time trade-off (TTO) method from the general population of South Korea. METHODS: We selected the same EQ-5D health states as those in the UK MVH study. The Korean version of EQ-5D questionnaire and TTO method were used for the valuation process. We interviewed 500 people as a representative sample of the general population in Seoul and Gyeonggido. The result was compared with those from UK, Japan, and USA by Spearman's rank correlation and t-test. RESULTS: TTO values for 42 EQ-5D health states and 'unconscious' state were obtained from the general South Korean population. The best one was '11112' state and the worst one was 'unconscious' state. The states worse than death were '33323', '33333', and 'unconscious' states, which had negative TTO values. There was a strong correlation between TTO values of the EQ-5D health states and those of their corresponding states from UK, Japan, and USA (Spearman's correlation coefficient: 0.885, 0.882, and 0.944, respectively, p <0.001). However, absolute TTO values of most EQ-5D health states were significantly different from those of their corresponding states in other foreign studies (UK: 41/42, USA: 32/42, Japan: 15/17). CONCLUSIONS: We found that the Korean general population TTO values for EQ-5D health states were different from those of other foreign studies, suggesting that a specific Korean valuation set should be developed and used for economic evaluation studies in South Korea.
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Original Article
Disability Weights for the Korean Burden of Disease Study: Focused on Comparison with Disability Weights in the Australian Burden of Disease Study.
Young Kyung Do, Seok Jun Yoon, Jung Kyu Lee, Young Hoon Kwon, Sang Il Lee, Changyup Kim, Kidong Park, Yong Ik Kim, Youngsoo Shin
J Prev Med Public Health. 2004;37(1):59-71.
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AbstractAbstract PDF
OBJECTIVE
This study aimed to measure the disability weights for the Korean Burden of Disease study, and to compare them with those adopted in the Australian study to examine the validity and describe the distinctive features. METHODS: The standardized valuation protocol was developed from the Global Burden of Disease (GBD) study and the Dutch Disability Weights study. Disability weights were measured for 123 diseases of the Korean version of Disease Classification by three panels of 10 medical doctors each. Then, overall distribution, correlation coefficients, difference by each disease, and mean of differences by disease group were analyzed for comparison of disability weights between the Korean and Australian studies. RESULTS: Korean disability weights ranged from 0.037 to 0.927. While the rank correlation coefficient was moderate to high (rs=0.68), Korean disability weights were higher than the corresponding Australian ones in 79.7% of the 118 diseases. Of these, war, leprosy, and most injuries showed the biggest differences. On the contrary, many infectious and parasitic diseases comprised the greater part of diseases of which Korean disability weights were lower. The mean of the differences was the highest in injuries of GBD disease groups, and in cardiovascular disease, injuries, and malignant neoplasm of the Korean disease category. CONCLUSION: Korean disability weights were found to be valid on the basis of overall distribution pattern and correlation, and are expected to be used as basic data for broadening the scope of burden of disease study. However, some distinctive features still remain to be explored in following studies.
Summary

JPMPH : Journal of Preventive Medicine and Public Health