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3 "Maternal health"
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Original Article
Postpartum Depression in Young Mothers in Urban and Rural Indonesia
Alifa Syamantha Putri, Tri Wurisastuti, Indri Yunita Suryaputri, Rofingatul Mubasyiroh
J Prev Med Public Health. 2023;56(3):272-281.   Published online May 7, 2023
DOI: https://doi.org/10.3961/jpmph.22.534
  • 2,776 View
  • 183 Download
  • 1 Crossref
AbstractAbstract PDF
Objectives
Young mothers are vulnerable to postpartum depression due to role transition-related stress. Understanding the causes underlying these stressors is essential for developing effective interventions.
Methods
This study analyzed the 2018 Indonesian Basic Health Research data. The Mini International Neuropsychiatric Interview was used to assess postpartum depression symptoms in mothers aged 15-24 years with infants aged 0-6 months. In 1285 subjects, the risk factors for postpartum depression were evaluated using multivariate logistic regression.
Results
The overall prevalence of depression in the 6 months postpartum was 4.0%, with a higher prevalence in urban areas (5.7%) than in rural areas (2.9%). Urban and rural young mothers showed distinct postpartum depression risk factors. In urban areas, living without a husband (odds ratio [OR], 3.82; 95% confidence interval [CI], 1.24 to 11.76), experiencing preterm birth (OR, 4.67; 95% CI, 1.50 to 14.50), having pregnancy complications (OR, 3.03; 95% CI, 1.20 to 7.66), and having postpartum complications (OR, 5.23; 95% CI, 1.98 to 13.80) were associated with a higher risk of postpartum depression. In rural areas, postpartum depression was significantly associated with a smaller household size (OR, 3.22; 95% CI, 1.00 to 10.38), unwanted pregnancy (OR, 4.40; 95% CI, 1.15 to 16.86), and pregnancy complications (OR, 3.41; 95% CI, 1.31 to 8.88).
Conclusions
In both urban and rural contexts, postpartum depression relates to the availability of others to accompany young mothers throughout the postpartum period and offer support with reproductive issues. Support from the family and the healthcare system is essential to young mothers’ mental health. The healthcare system needs to involve families to support young mothers’ mental health from pregnancy until the postpartum period.
Summary

Citations

Citations to this article as recorded by  
  • Qualitative Study of Perinatal Mental Health Services: Experiences and Perspectives of Health Workers and Patients
    Evi Diliana Rospia, Dwi Kartika Cahyaningtyas, Siti Mardiyah WD, Cahaya Indah Lestari
    EMBRIO.2023; 15(2): 216.     CrossRef
Scoping Review
Pre-pregnancy Diet to Maternal and Child Health Outcome: A Scoping Review of Current Evidence
Fadila Wirawan, Desak Gede Arie Yudhantari, Aghnaa Gayatri
J Prev Med Public Health. 2023;56(2):111-127.   Published online March 13, 2023
DOI: https://doi.org/10.3961/jpmph.22.472
  • 3,476 View
  • 195 Download
AbstractAbstract PDFSupplementary Material
Objectives
Pre-pregnancy diet has an important role in preparing for healthy generation. However, evidence on this issue has been scarce. A scoping review synthesising current evidence will support the demand to map ‘what has been researched’ on pre-pregnancy diet and maternal and child health.
Methods
Systematic search was performed using PICOS (Population, Intervention, Comparison, Outcomes, and Study design) framework in electronic databases. Articles were screened for eligibility, summarized, and the quality was assessed using the National Institute of Health assessment tool. The review structure complies with Preferred Reporting Items for Systematic Reviews and Meta-Analyses Extension for Scoping Reviews guide.
Results
Forty-two articles were included after full-text screening. Twenty-five studies were in high-income countries (HICs), six in each upper-middle income, five in lower-middle income countries (LMICs), and one in low-income countries (LIC). Based on the regions: North America (n=16), Europe (n=5), South America (n=4), Australia (n=4), Asia (n=5), Middle East (n=2), and sub-Saharan Africa (n=1). The two-most observed diet-related exposures were dietary pattern (n=17) and dietary quality (n=12). The most assessed outcome was gestational diabetes mellitus (n=28) and fetal and newborn anthropometry (n=7). The average quality score±standard deviation was 70±18%.
Conclusions
Research related to pre-pregnancy diet is still concentrated in HICs. The context of diet may vary; therefore, future research is encouraged in LMICs and LICs context, and Mediterranean, South-East Asia, Pacific, and African regions. Some maternal and child nutrition-related morbidity, such as anemia and micronutrient deficiencies, have not been discussed. Research on these aspects will benefit to fill in the gaps related to pre-pregnancy diet and maternal and child health.
Summary
Perspective
Group Antenatal Care: A Paradigm Shift to Explore for Positive Impacts in Resource-poor Settings
Bhanu Pratap Singh Gaur, Jyothi Vasudevan, Bhabani Pegu
J Prev Med Public Health. 2021;54(1):81-84.   Published online December 8, 2020
DOI: https://doi.org/10.3961/jpmph.20.349
  • 3,693 View
  • 135 Download
  • 3 Web of Science
  • 3 Crossref
AbstractAbstract PDF
The delivery of high-quality antenatal care is a perennial global concern for improving maternal and neonatal outcomes. Antenatal care is currently provided mainly on a one-to-one basis, but growing evidence has emerged to support the effectiveness of group antenatal care. Providing care in a small group gives expectant mothers the opportunity to have discussions with their peers about certain issues and concerns that are unique to them and to form a support system that will improve the quality and utilization of antenatal care services. The aim of this article is to promote group antenatal care as a means to increase utilization of healthcare.
Summary

Citations

Citations to this article as recorded by  
  • Improving health literacy through group antenatal care: results from a cluster randomized controlled trial in Ghana
    Jody R. Lori, Vida Ami Kukula, Liya Liu, Veronica E.A. Apetorgbor, Bidisha Ghosh, Elizabeth Awini, Nancy Lockhart, Georgina Amankwah, Ruth Zielinski, Cheryl A. Moyer, John Williams
    BMC Pregnancy and Childbirth.2024;[Epub]     CrossRef
  • Magnitude, disparity, and predictors of poor-quality antenatal care service: A systematic review and meta-analysis
    Dereje Bayissa Demissie, Gebeyaw Molla, Firew Tiruneh Tiyare, Abebe Sorsa Badacho, Ashenif Tadele
    SAGE Open Medicine.2024;[Epub]     CrossRef
  • Adolescents’ experiences with group antenatal care: Insights from a mixed‐methods study in Senegal
    Ashley Vandermorris, Britt McKinnon, Mohamadou Sall, Adrian Witol, Mahamadou Traoré, Fatma Lamesse‐Diedhiou, Diego G. Bassani
    Tropical Medicine & International Health.2021; 26(12): 1700.     CrossRef

JPMPH : Journal of Preventive Medicine and Public Health