| Home | E-Submission | Sitemap | Contact Us |  
top_img
J Prev Med Public Health > Volume 43(3); 2010 > Article
Journal of Preventive Medicine and Public Health 2010;43(3): 235-244. doi: https://doi.org/10.3961/jpmph.2010.43.3.235
Association Between Prophylactic Antibiotic Use and Surgical Site Infection Based on Quality Assessment Data in Korea.
Kyoung Hoon Kim, Choon Seon Park, Jin Hee Chang, Nam Soon Kim, Jin Seo Lee, Bo Ram Choi, Byung Ran Lee, Kyoo Duck Lee, Sun Min Kim, Seon A Yeom
1Health Insurance Review & Assessment Service, Korea. parkcs@hiramail.net
2Department of Preventive Medicine, Dongguk University College of Medicine, Korea.
3Division of Infectious diseases, Hallym University Sacred Heart Hospital, Hallym University College of Medicine, Korea.
ABSTRACT
OBJECTIVES: To examine the prophylactic antibiotic use in reducing surgical site infection. METHODS: This was a retrospective study for patients aged 18 years and older who underwent gastrectomy, cholecystectomy, colectomy, cesarean section and hysterectomy. The data source was quality assessment data of the Health Insurance Review & Assessment Service gathered from medical records of 302 national hospitals. Prophylactic antibiotic use was defined as: timely antibiotic administration or inappropriate antibiotic selection. We performed hierarchical logistic regression to examine the association between prophylactic antibiotic use and surgical site infection with adjustment for covariates. RESULTS: The study population consisted of 16 348 patients (1588 gastrectomies, 2327 cholecystectomies, 1,384 colectomies, 3977 hysterectomies and 7072 cesarean sections) and surgical site infection was identified in 351 (2.1%) patients. The rates of timely antibiotic administration and inappropriate antibiotic selection varied according to procedures. Cholecystectomy patients who received timely prophylactic antibiotic had a significantly reduced risk of surgical site infection compared with those who did not receive a timely prophylactic antibiotics (OR 0.64, 95% CI=0.50-0.83), but no significant reduction was observed for other procedures. When inappropriate prophylactic antibiotics were given, the risk of surgical site infection significantly increased: 8.26-fold (95% CI=4.34-15.7) for gastrectomy, 4.73-fold (95% CI=2.09-10.7) for colectomy, 2.34-fold (95% CI=1.14-4.80) for cesarean section, 4.03-fold (95% CI=1.93-8.42) for hysterectomy. CONCLUSIONS: This study examines the association among timely antibiotic administration, inappropriate antibiotic selection and surgical site infection. Patients who received timely and appropriate antibiotics had a decreased risk of surgical site infection. Efforts to improve the timing of antibiotic administration and use of appropriate antibiotic are needed to lower the risk of surgical site infection.
Key words: Surgical site infection; Antibiotic prophylaxis; Hierarchical logistic regression
Editorial Office
Graduate School of Public Health, Seoul National University
1 Gwanak-ro, Gwanak-gu, Seoul 08826, Korea
Tel : +82-2-740-8328   Fax : +82-2-764-8328   E-mail: jpmphe@gmail.com
About |  Browse Articles |  Current Issue |  For Authors and Reviewers
Copyright © 2019 by Korean Society for Preventive Medicine. All rights reserved.                 powerd by m2community