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Baek Geun Jeong 9 Articles
A Review on Socioeconomic Position Indicators in Health Inequality Research.
Yong Jun Choi, Baek Geun Jeong, Sung Il Cho, Kyunghee Jung-Choi, Soong Nang Jang, Minah Kang, Young Ho Khang
J Prev Med Public Health. 2007;40(6):475-486.
DOI: https://doi.org/10.3961/jpmph.2007.40.6.475
  • 5,387 View
  • 127 Download
  • 16 Crossref
AbstractAbstract PDF
OBJECTIVES
Socioeconomic position (SEP) refers to the socioeconomic factors that influence which position an individual or group of people will hold within the structure of a society. In this study, we provide a comprehensive review of various indicators of SEP, including education level, occupation-based SEP, income and wealth, area SEP, lifecourse SEP, and SEP indicators for women, elderly and youth. METHODS AND RESULTS: This report provides a brief theoretical background and discusses the measurement, interpretation issues, advantages and limitations associated with the use of each SEP indicator. We also describe some problems that arise when selecting SEP indicators and highlight the indicators that appear to be appropriate for health inequality research. Some practical information for use in health inequality research in South Korea is also presented. CONCLUSIONS: Investigation into the associations between various SEP indicators and health outcomes can provide a more complete understanding of mechanisms between SEP and health. The relationship between specific SEP indicators and specific health outcomes can vary by country due to the differences in the historical, socioeconomic, and cultural contexts of the SEP indicators.
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  • How does subjective social status at school at the age of 15 affect the risk of depressive symptoms at the ages of 18, 21, and 28? A longitudinal study
    Marie Kjærgaard Lange, Vivi Just-Nørregaard, Trine Nøhr Winding, Chung-Ying Lin
    PLOS ONE.2023; 18(12): e0296349.     CrossRef
  • Educational level and colorectal cancer risk: the mediating roles of lifestyle and dietary factors
    Lei Li, Yu-Jing Fang, Alinuer Abulimiti, Chu-Yi Huang, Kai-Yan Liu, Yu-Ming Chen, Cai-Xia Zhang
    European Journal of Cancer Prevention.2022; 31(2): 137.     CrossRef
  • Socioeconomic disparities in self-rated health in two East Asian countries: Comparative study between Japan and Korea
    Shiho Kino, Soong-nang Jang, Shuko Takahashi, Daniel K. Ebner, Ichiro Kawachi
    Social Science & Medicine.2020; 253: 112945.     CrossRef
  • Income Difference in Attitudes towards Cancer in General Population: Findings from a National Survey
    Hye Sook Min, Jinsil Park, Young Ae Kim, Hyung Kook Yang, Keeho Park
    Journal of Korean Medical Science.2018;[Epub]     CrossRef
  • Place of death and associated gender difference in Korea 2006–2014: Evidence from exit interviews of the Korean Longitudinal Study of Ageing
    Ja-kyung Lee, Soong-nang Jang
    Archives of Gerontology and Geriatrics.2018; 78: 196.     CrossRef
  • The mediation effect of individual eating behaviours on the relationship between socioeconomic status and dietary quality in children: the Korean National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey
    Hye Ah Lee, Hyesook Park
    European Journal of Nutrition.2017; 56(3): 1339.     CrossRef
  • Domestic Civil Support Missions Can Aggravate Negative Mental Health Outcomes Among National Guardsmen: The Moderating Role of Economic Difficulties
    Dale W. Russell, Josh B. Kazman, David M. Benedek, Robert J. Ursano, Cristel A. Russell
    Journal of Traumatic Stress.2017; 30(2): 195.     CrossRef
  • Household and area income levels are associated with smoking status in the Korean adult population
    Woo-Jun Yun, Jung-Ae Rhee, Sun A Kim, Sun-Seog Kweon, Young-Hoon Lee, So-Yeon Ryu, Soon-Woo Park, Dong Hyun Kim, Min-Ho Shin
    BMC Public Health.2015;[Epub]     CrossRef
  • Socioeconomic disparities of periodontitis in Koreans based on the KNHANES IV
    D‐W Kim, J‐C Park, TH‐T Rim, U‐W Jung, C‐S Kim, N Donos, I‐H Cha, S‐H Choi
    Oral Diseases.2014; 20(6): 551.     CrossRef
  • Children's Mental Health in the Area Affected by the Hebei Spirit Oil Spill Accident
    Mina Ha, Woo-Chul Jeong, Myungho Lim, Hojang Kwon, Yeyong Choi, Seung-Jin Yoo, Su Ryun Noh, Hae-Kwan Cheong
    Environmental Health and Toxicology.2013; 28: e2013010.     CrossRef
  • The Relationship between Smoking, Alcohol Drinking, and Parenting Behavior Perceived by Adolescents
    Yun Ho Roh, Eun Joo Kim
    Korean Journal of Health Education and Promotion.2013; 30(2): 71.     CrossRef
  • Socioeconomic Indicators Associated with Initiation and Cessation of Smoking among Women in Seoul
    Yu-Na Kim, Young-Gyu Cho, Cheol-Hwan Kim, Jae-Heon Kang, Hyun-Ah Park, Kyoung-Woo Kim, Yang-Im Hur, Su-Hyun Lee, Yun-Min Na, No-Yai Park
    Korean Journal of Family Medicine.2012; 33(1): 1.     CrossRef
  • Association between Household Income and Asthma Symptoms among Elementary School Children in Seoul
    Won-Jun Choi, In-Yong Um, Soyoung Hong, Hye Yung Yum, Hyunjung Kim, Hojang Kwon
    Environmental Health and Toxicology.2012; 27: e2012020.     CrossRef
  • Socio-economic disparities in behavioural risk factors for cancer and use of cancer screening services in Korean adults aged 30 years and older: The Third Korean National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey, 2005 (KNHANES III)
    K. Lee, H.T. Lim, S.-S. Hwang, D.W. Chae, S.M. Park
    Public Health.2010; 124(12): 698.     CrossRef
  • Socioeconomic Inequity in Self-Rated Health Status and Contribution of Health Behavioral Factors in Korea
    Minkyung Kim, Woojin Chung, Seungji Lim, Soojin Yoon, Jakyoung Lee, Eunkyung Kim, Lanju Ko
    Journal of Preventive Medicine and Public Health.2010; 43(1): 50.     CrossRef
  • Associations of Income and Wealth with Health Status in the Korean Elderly
    Bo-Hyun Park, Minsoo Jung, Tae-Jin Lee
    Journal of Preventive Medicine and Public Health.2009; 42(5): 275.     CrossRef
The Levels of Psychosocial Stress, Job Stress and Related Factors of Medical Doctors Practicing at Local Clinics.
Moon Kuk Kang, Yune Sik Kang, Jang Rak Kim, Baek Geun Jeong, Ki Soo Park, Sin Kam, Dae Yong Hong
J Prev Med Public Health. 2007;40(2):177-184.
DOI: https://doi.org/10.3961/jpmph.2007.40.2.177
  • 5,251 View
  • 60 Download
  • 10 Crossref
AbstractAbstract PDF
OBJECTIVES
This study was conducted to investigate the levels of psychosocial stress, job stress and their related factors among medical doctors practicing at local clinics. METHODS: A survey using a self administered questionnaire was administered to 1,456 doctors practicing at private clinics via post for 2 months (2006. 1 - 2006. 3). Psychosocial stress, job stress,demographic factors, job related factors and health related behaviors were investigated. Among the eligible study population, the respondents were 428 doctors (29.4%). RESULTS: The average scores of psychosocial stress and job stress were 2.19 and 3.13, respectively. The levels of psychosocial stress and job stress were statistically lower in older respondents, those who worked shorter or who were more satisfied with their job, and those with higher socioeconomic status. The level of psychosocial stress was related with smoking status, drinking status and exercise. The level of job stress was related with smoking status and exercise. In multiple linear regression analysis using psychosocial stress as a dependent variable, age, working hours per day, job satisfaction and perception on socioeconomic status were significant independent variables. In analysis using job stress as a dependent variable, age, working hours per day and job satisfaction were significant independent variables. CONCLUSIONS: Stress affects the doctor-patient relationship, productivity and overall health level of people. Therefore, it is important to manage and relieve the stress of doctors. It is suggested that more advanced studies on stress level and related factors and ways to improve the stress and health related behaviors of medical doctors should be conducted.
Summary

Citations

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  • A Preliminary Study About Occupational Stress and Career Satisfaction of Korean Psychiatrists
    Dae yong Sim, Jong Hyuk Choi, Yeong Gi Kyeon
    Journal of Korean Neuropsychiatric Association.2022; 61(1): 28.     CrossRef
  • Work–Life Conflict and Its Health Effects on Korean Gastroenterologists According to Age and Sex
    Eun Sun Jang, Seon Mee Park, Young Sook Park, Jong Chan Lee, Nayoung Kim
    Digestive Diseases and Sciences.2020; 65(1): 86.     CrossRef
  • The effect of mindfulness in motion-based trainings on resiliency, emotion regulation, and job stress
    Mohammad Taghi Movassagh, Nasrin Arshadi, Soodabeh Bassaknejad, Kiomars Beshlideh
    Journal of Occupational Health and Epidemiology.2019; 8(1): 49.     CrossRef
  • Relationship of Sleep Quality, Physical Stress, Psychological Stress, and Job Stress among Residents
    So-Young Yoo, Young-Ah Choi, Young-Kyu Park, Sung-Min Cho, Kyung-Shik Lee, Ga-Young Joo, Hyun Keun Lee
    Korean Journal of Health Promotion.2017; 17(1): 9.     CrossRef
  • Correlation of occupational stress with depression, anxiety, and sleep in Korean dentists: cross-sectional study
    Kyung-Won Song, Won-Seok Choi, Hee-Jung Jee, Chi-Sung Yuh, Yong-Ku Kim, Leen Kim, Heon-Jeong Lee, Chul-Hyun Cho
    BMC Psychiatry.2017;[Epub]     CrossRef
  • Relationship between occupational stress and depressive mood among interns and residents in a tertiary hospital, Seoul, Korea
    Keon Kim, Sunhwa Lee, Yoon Hee Choi
    Clinical and Experimental Emergency Medicine.2015; 2(2): 117.     CrossRef
  • Stress management and mind-body medicine: focusing on relaxation and meditation
    Yune Sik Kang
    Journal of the Korean Medical Association.2011; 54(3): 284.     CrossRef
  • Mind-Body Approach in the Area of Preventive Medicine: Focusing on Relaxation and Meditation for Stress Management
    Yunesik Kang
    Journal of Preventive Medicine and Public Health.2010; 43(5): 445.     CrossRef
  • The Work Related Psychosocial Factor and Disease among Health Professional
    Sang Baek Koh
    Journal of the Korean Medical Association.2010; 53(6): 467.     CrossRef
  • Job Satisfaction, Subjective Class Identification and Associated Factors of Professional Socialization in Korean Physicians
    Hyung-Gon Yoon, Seok-Jun Yoon, In-Kyoung Hwang, Yeong-Bae Mun, Hee-Young Lee
    Journal of Preventive Medicine and Public Health.2008; 41(1): 30.     CrossRef
Developing the Predictive Model for the Group at High Risk for Colon Cancer.
Ae Kyoung Lee, Sang Yi Lee, Il Soo Park, Su Young Kim, Tae Ho Yoon, Baek Geun Jeong
J Prev Med Public Health. 2006;39(5):438-446.
  • 2,125 View
  • 47 Download
AbstractAbstract PDF
OBJECTIVES
We developed the predictive model for the incidence of colon cancer by utilizing the health screening data of the National Health Insurance in Korea. We also explored the characteristics of the high risk group for colon cancer. METHODS: The predictive model was used to determine those people who have a high risk for colon cancer within 2 years of their NHI health screening, and we excluded the people who had already been treated for cancer or who were cancer patient. The study population is the insured of the NHI, aged 40 or over and they had undergone health screening from the year 2000 to 2004, according to NHI health screening formula. We performed logistic regression analysis and used SAS Enterprise Miner 4.1. RESULTS: This study shows that there exists a higher rate of colon cancer in males than females. Also, for the population in their 60s, the incidence rate of colon cancer is much higher by 5.36 times than that for those people in their 40s. Amongst the behavioral factors, heavy drinking is the most important determinant of the colon cancer incidence (7.39 times in males and 21.51 times in females). CONCLUSIONS: Our study confirms that the major influencing factors for the incidence of colon cancer are drinking, lack of exercise, a medical history of colon polypus and a family history of colon cancer. As a result, we can choose the group that is at a high risk for colon cancer and provide customized medical information and selective management services according to their characteristics.
Summary
The Relationship between Regional Material Deprivation and the Standardized Mortality Ratio of the Community Residents Aged 15-64 in Korea.
Baek Geun Jeong, Kap Yeol Jung, Joon Youn Kim, Ok Ryun Moon, Yong Hwan Lee, Young Seoub Hong, Tae Ho Yoon
J Prev Med Public Health. 2006;39(1):46-52.
  • 2,780 View
  • 62 Download
AbstractAbstract PDF
OBJECTIVES
This study was performed to investigate the relationship between regional material deprivation and the standardized mortality ratios(SMRs) of community residents aged 15-64 in Korea. METHODS: SMRs were investigated using the registered death data from 1995 to 2000 that was obtained from the Korean National Statistics Office with the denominators being drawn from the 1995 to 2000 census. Material deprivation was measured using the Townsend score that was calculated from the 1995 to 2000 census. The relationship between the regional material deprivation and the SMRs of the community residents aged 15-64 was investigated by using ANOVA, Spearman's rank correlation analysis and Pearson's correlation analysis. The trends in mortality inequality were investigated using the concentration index. RESULTS: On the ANOVA, the SMRs of the men and women residents in the least deprived areas were the smallest and those in the most deprived areas were the largest. Spearman's rank correlation analysis, Pearson's correlation analysis and the concentration index revealed that significant positive relationships exist between the regional material deprivation and the SMRs of the community residents aged 15-64. CONCLUSIONS: This study suggests that there are mortality inequalities among the communities in Korea and part of this difference is due to the material deprivation of the community. Strategies aimed at reducing mortality inequalities among the communities will be needed to address economic inequalities. Further studies are needed to explore the mechanisms of how the regional deprivation influences on health and how the other factors of the community influence on the health of the community residents.
Summary
Prevalence of Metabolic Syndrome and Waist Circumference Estimation in Some Korean Adults.
Young Seoub Hong, Byoung Gwon Kim, Baek Geun Jeong, Yong Woo Park, Jong Tae Park, Kap Yeol Jung, Joon Youn Kim
J Prev Med Public Health. 2004;37(1):51-58.
  • 2,200 View
  • 30 Download
AbstractAbstract PDF
OBJECTIVE
The purpose of this study was to estimate the prevalence of metabolic syndrome, as defined by the ATP III report, in some Korean adults and use the Asian-Pacific proposed waist circumference to investigate waist circumference in some Korean adults using ROC curves. METHODS: Study subjects were seventy-five thousands and ninety one persons (47, 979 men and 27, 111 women) who were selected among the patients who visited hospital for health evaluation from January 2000 to December 2001. All subjects were measured by height, weight, waist and hip circumferences, blood pressure and blood chemistry (lipid profile). RESULTS: The mean age was 41.6+/-8.5 years in men, 41.1+/-10.4 years in women (p< 0.05). Body mass index was in the normal range in 35.3% of men, and 55.9% of women. In both men and women, blood pressure, blood sugar, total cholesterol and triglyceride were positively correlated with BMI. waist circumference, and Broca's index (p< 0.01). However HDL. choloesterol was correlated negatively (p< 0.01). Using ROC curve, the calculated waist circumferences were 84 cm in men (sensitivity 61.4% and specificity 64.1%) and 74 cm in women (sensitivity 65.0% and specificity 73.2%). The age adjusted prevalences of the metabolic syndrome as defined by NCEP ATP III were different for men (6.4%) and women (14.6%). The prevalence increased from 1.2% among participants aged 20 through 29years to 15.0% among participants aged over 60years in men (p< 0.05) and from 1.6% to 27.4% respectively, in women. The age adjusted prevalences, as defined by using the waist circumference that was recommended by WHO's regional office for the western Pacific, were 10.6% in men and 18.5% in women. The age adjusted prevalences, as defined by using the waist circumference that was calculated by the ROC curves, were 17.1% in men and 22.4% in women. And All prevalences were increased following increased BMI and Broca's index. CONCLUSIONS: The prevalence of metabolic syndrome in some Korean adults was lower than that in western adults. Nevertheless because waist circumference was differed among race and region, application of the same criteria was not proper. Morcover, a higher awareness was required in women, because the prevalence of metabolic syndrome was rapidly increased with increment of age.
Summary
Socioeconomic Costs of Obesity for Korean Adults.
Baek Geun Jeong, Ok Ryun Moon, Nam Soon Kim, Jae Heon Kang, Tae Ho Yoon, Sang Yi Lee, Sin Jae Lee
Korean J Prev Med. 2002;35(1):1-12.
  • 2,460 View
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AbstractAbstract PDF
OBJECTIVE
To estimate the socioeconomic costs of obesity in Korea, 1998. METHODS: The 1998 National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey (1998 NHNES) data was used and 10,880 persons who had taken health examinations were selected for study. Essential hypertension, NIDDM (non insulin-dependent diabetes mellitus), dyslipidemia, osteoarthritis, coronary heart disease, stroke were included as obesity related disease. The data of direct costs of obesity was obtained from the National Federation of Medical Insurance. The category of indirect costs was the loss of productivity caused by premature death and admission, time costs, traffic costs, nursing fees due to obesity. Multiple logistic regression model was developed to estimate prevalence odds ratio by obesity class adjusted demographic and socio-ecnomic factors and calculate PAF (Population Attributable Fraction) of obesity on obesity related disease. And we finally calculated the socioeconomic costs of obesity in relation to BMI with PAF. RESULTS: The direct costs of obesity were 2,126 billion~965 billion Won in considering out of pocket payment to uninsured services, and the indirect costs of obesity were 2,099 billion~1,086 billion Won. Consequently, in considering out of pocket payment to uninsured services, the socioeconomic costs of obesity were 4,225 billion~2,050 billion Won, which corresponded to about 0.094% ~0.046% of GDP and 1.88%~0.91 of total health care costs in Korea. CONCLUSIONS: Obesity represents a major health problem with significant economic implications for the society. This results are conservative estimates as far as all obesity related disease and all health care and indirect costs were not included due to missing information. Further studies are needed to caculate socioeconomic costs of obesity more exactly.
Summary
Increasing Prevalence of Obesity Related Disease for Koreans Associated with Overweight and Obesity.
Nam Soon Kim, Ok Ryun Moon, Jae Heon Kang, Sang Yi Lee, Baek Geun Jeong, Sin Jae Lee, Tae Ho Yoon, Kyung Hwa Hwang
Korean J Prev Med. 2001;34(4):309-315.
  • 2,646 View
  • 73 Download
AbstractAbstract PDF
OBJECTIVE
To develop a better understanding of the relationship between weight status and the prevalence of obesity related diseases in the Korean population. METHODS: The 1998 Korean National Health and Nutrition Survey was used and 10,880 persons who had previously taken health examinations were selected for study. The Korean Society for the Study of Obesity's classification of weight status was used. Hypertension, diabetes mellitus, dyslipidemia, osteoarthritis, chronic heart disease, stroke were included as obesity related disease. A logistic regression model was developed to estimate the prevalence odds ratio by obesity class adjusted for demographic and socio-economic factors and we converted the odds ratio to a prevalence ratio using the base line prevalence of disease to aid in the interpretation of the ratios. RESULTS: The prevalence of obesity was 26.3% based on the KSSO classification (BMI> or =25). A graded increase in the prevalence ratio was observed with increasing severity of overweight and obesity for all health outcomes with the exception of chronic heart disease in men and stroke in both men and women. With normal weight individuals as the reference, for men who were younger than 50 years, the prevalence ratios were highest for hypertension BMI<23-25: 1.70(95% CI=1.41-2.05), 25 or =30: 4.83(95% CI=3.78-5.84). The prevalence ratios for dyslipidemia were as high as hypertension, but were lower than hypertension for diabetes mellitus and osteoarthritis. Prevalence ratios generally were greater in younger adults. The prevalence of having 2 or more obesity related diseases increased with weight status category, except in people who were older than 50 years. CONCLUSIONS: Based on results, obesity is an increasingly important health problem in Korea and the disease burden increases according to weight status. For Korean adults, the strongest relationship was seen between weight status and hypertension and dyslipidemia. In older people the impact of excess weight and obesity is stronger than that seen in younger people. Increased efforts in the study of obesity and prevention and treatment of obesity and obesity related disease are required.
Summary
Change of Medical Utilization Claims in Self-employees before and after the Economic Crisis in Korea.
Sin Jae Lee, Ok Ryun Moon, Won Ki Jhang, Soon Ae Choi, Sang Yi Lee, Nam Soon Kim, Baek Geun Jeong
Korean J Prev Med. 2001;34(1):28-34.
  • 2,193 View
  • 21 Download
AbstractAbstract PDF
OBJECTIVES
To investigate the changing pattern of medical utilization claims following the economic crisis in Korea. METHODS: The original data consisted of the claims of the 'Medical insurance program of self-employees' between 1997 and 1998. The data was selected by medical treatment day ranging between 1 January and 30 June. Medical utilizations were calculated each year by the frequency of claims, visit days for outpatients, length of stay for inpatients, total days of medication, and the sum of expenses. RESULTS: The length of stay as an inpatient in 1998 was decreased 4.7 percent in comparison to 1997. However, inpatient expenses in 1998 increased 10.8 percent as compared to 1997. Inpatient hospital claims in 1998 increased 6.2 percent over 1997, although general hospital inpatient claims in 1998 decreased 3.3 percent in comparison to 1997. The outpatient claim frequency decreased 7.3 in 1998 percent as compared to 1997. Outpatient visit days of in 1998 were decreased 8.5 percent in comparison to that recorded in 1997. Outpatient claim frequencies of 'gu region' in 1998 decreased 10.5 percent comparison to that in 1997, but 'city and gun region' decreased less than 'gu region'. CONCLUSIONS: Medical utilization in 1998 deceased in relation to 1997. Medical utilization by outpatients decreased more than that of inpatients. Medical utilization by 'gu regio n' decreased more than the other regions.
Summary
Differences in Health Behaviors among the Social Strata in Korea.
Tae Ho Yoon, Ok Ryun Moon, Sang Yi Lee, Baek Geun Jeong, Sin Jae Lee, Nam Sun Kim, Won Ki Jhang
Korean J Prev Med. 2000;33(4):469-476.
  • 2,475 View
  • 51 Download
AbstractAbstract PDF
OBJECTIVES
To analyze differences in health behaviors among the social strata in Korea by using the 1995 National Health and Health Behavior Survey Data. METHODS: Study participants numbered 2,352 men and 1,016 women aged between 15-64 years old, with housewives, students and non-waged family workers excluded. Health behaviors in this study were defined according to the recommendations of the Alameda 7 study. The measure of health behaviors was based on the Health Practices Index(HPI; 0-5 range, with the exclusion of snacking between meals and regularly eating breakfast) developed by the Alameda County research. The significance of the relationship between social strata and HPI was assessed by considering the adjusted means from the multi-variate model. RESULTS: For men, incidence rates of never having smoked, no/moderate use of alcohol, regular exercise, and regular 7-8 hours sleep per night were higher in the upper social strata. Meanwhile, for women, incidence rates of never having smoked, no/moderate use of alcohol, appropriate weight, regular exercise, and regular 7-8 hours sleep per night were higher in the upper strata. HPI varied significantly among social strata in both sexes (p<0.001), a result which held true when adjusted for age, education, income, social insurance type, marital status and region. CONCLUSIONS: Health behaviors assessed by Health Practices Index(HPI) varied significantly among social strata for both sexes. Therefore, the existing gap in health behaviors among social strata can be corrected more effectively by target oriented health promotional activities.
Summary

JPMPH : Journal of Preventive Medicine and Public Health