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JPMPH : Journal of Preventive Medicine and Public Health

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Eun Kyeong Jeong 2 Articles
Epidemiologic Investigation of an Outbreak of Shigellosis in Kyongju, Korea.
Hyun Sul Lim, Cheol Jung, Geun Ryang Bae, Yeong Joo Hur, Sang Won Lee, Eun Kyeong Jeong
Korean J Prev Med. 2000;33(1):1-9.
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OBJECTIVES
This study was carried out to investigate the sources of infection and modes of transmission of an outbreak of shigellosis that occurred among pupils of "M" primary school and residents near the school in Kyongju from Sept. 24 to Oct. 24, 1998. METHODS: The subjects who completed a questionnaire and a rectal swab for microbiologic examinations were 1,534 persons (781 males, 753 females), including 469 pupils of "M" primary school (268 males, 201 females). Bacteriological examinations of underground water and simple piped water were done. RESULTS: The attack rate of diarrhea was 28.7% in the subjects from Sept. 24 to Oct. 24, 1998. There was no difference in attack rate of diarrhea by gender, but it was significantly higher in the pupils of "M" primary school than others (p<0.01). The attack rate of diarrhea by resident areas was no different to the pupils of "M" primary school, but was significantly higher in the residents of Mohwa 2 Ri except pupils that "M" primary school is located in (p<0.01). The distribution of date of onset revealed the exposure date to be Sept, 22 and 23 in consideration of incubation periods and common source outbreak followed propagative spread in the epidemic curve. The major characteristics of diarrhea were watery (89.1%) in nature, 1~3 days (72.5%) in duration, 2~3 times (63.9%) in frequency. The clinical symptoms among the diarrheal cases included abdominal pain (74.1%), fever (56.4%), headache (55.9%), chill (40.4%) and tenesmus (31.4%). CONCLUSIONS: The source of infection was estimated to be contaminated underground water and simple piped water caused by leakage from the cess pool. It is highly necessary that the management of drinking water and cess pools should be done thoroughly.
Summary
A study on the practice variations according to physician characteristics.
Eun Kyeong Jeong, Ok Ryun Moon, Chang Yup Kim
Korean J Prev Med. 1993;26(4):614-627.
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It is well known that a physician's personal characteristic affects his practice pattern. Furthermore, a physician's specialty has powerful influences on his practice pattern. However, despite the fact specialization has received the most attention for its influence on physician's service behavior, few studies have been conducted on the variations of contents and volume of physician's services. This study has intended to identify factors influencing the practice variations according to various physician characteristics. There are some other evidences that medical care providers are different in using of health services and resources in Korea. Four physician characteristics were selected for the analysis, two demographical factors, age and sex, and two practice factors, place of practice and medical specialty. Also, three indicators of service amount(total amount of insurance claim bill, number of visits per case, number of prescriptions per case) were selected. From the pool of insurance claims for ambulatory care received by the Korean National Federation of Medical Insurance(NFMI), 84,898 cases were randomly sampled. In the meantime using physician database of NFMI, 613 general practitioners(GP), 107 regular family physicians(FP), 483 'grandfather' family physicians(GFP), and 1,157 specialist practitioners(SP) were randomly sampled. Their different practice contents were compared concerning the specialty, age groups, sex, and practice sites(urban-rural). Specialist physicians tend to provide more costly care than do generalists. General practitioners and family physicians usually make fewer following visits and prescriptions. Age is also the important factor in determining the amount of services, which is highest at the physician's age group of 40's. Female doctors and urban practitioners use much more resources than their counterparts respectively. Research findings suggest that physician's characteristics particularly the specialty can affect practice patterns and resource utilizations. Other characteristics such as age and sex are not controllable but physician's specialty is relatively easily controllable during the entire phases of policy implementation. This is all the more true in the individual's initial decision of his specialty. Specialization therefore should receive policymaker's attention for its potential influence on medical care utilization and health care expenditure.
Summary

JPMPH : Journal of Preventive Medicine and Public Health