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Hyung Jong Park 3 Articles
A study on the productivity of physicians operating clinic in Kyeongsangnamdo.
Jeong Ho Kim, Kwi Won Jeong, Jin Ho Chun, Chae Un Lee, Ki Taek Pae, Kong Hyun Kim, Hae Rim Shin, Hyung Jong Park
Korean J Prev Med. 1991;24(2):171-180.
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AbstractAbstract PDF
Productivity analysis of physician is one of essential factors for the optimal health manpower planning. Among 690 physicians operating clinic and registered on the Kyeongsangnamdo Medical Association, 623 physicians were studied with a structural questionnaire from April 1 to May 31, 1990. This study covers the general characteristics and productivity of physicians and attempts to find relevant determinants of their productivity through stepwise multiple regression analysis based on collected data. The major results were as follows. First, physicians were more prevalent 35~44 group (38.2%) in age, male (95.8%) in sex, specialist (76.5%) in specialization, city (78.0%) in geographical location. Age group of 35-54 and specialist were more prevalent in cities than in counties, while age group of 25-44 and 55 over and general practitioner in counties (p<0.001). Second, daily outpatient load of all physician were 77.1 persons on average. Age group of 35~44 had the most outpatient load (90.3 persons) among all age group, 6~10 years group (94.2 persons) in years of duration of practice, 11 hours per day group (83.4 persons) in working hours per day. Specialists had more outpatient load (82.6 persons) than general practitioners (61.1 persons) and physicians in cities had more (80.2 persons) than physicians in counties (66.3 persons). Daily average outpatient load of physicians were significantly different by their age, speciality, number of assistants and years of practice (p<0.001) and working location (p<0.05), but not significantly different by working hours per day of physician (p>0.1). Third, the productivity of physicians operating clinic were significantly affected by the three factorsnumber of assistants of physician, age of physician and duration of practice at the current clinic. Age of physician had negative regression coefficient.
Summary
Differential Effects of Communication Media on Family Planning Behavior.
Hyung Jong Park, Kyung Kyoon Chung, Dal Sun Han
Korean J Prev Med. 1975;8(1):37-52.
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AbstractAbstract PDF
The use of communication media suitable for the audience and message is important in conducting effective family planning IEC activities. This study 'intended to assess differential effects of various media used by the Korean program on rural women's family planning knowledge, attitude, and practice. Data for the study were collected originally for the study of family planning mothers' clubs by the School of Public Health, Seoul National University in 1973. The sample was drawn according to the principle usually employed in obtaining a small sample from a large area. Initially, a sample of 25 Gun's was selected from a total of 138 Gun's by systematic random sampling on the basis of the list of number of mother's clubs in each Gun. Secondly, from each of these primary units(Gun) selected, two second stage units(Myon) were drawn by a systematic random sampling method based on the list of the number of Li's -in each Myon. Finally, a sample of nine Li's was drawn by a simple random sampling method from each Myon selected in the second stage sampling. In this way, a total of 450 Li's, 18 Li's from each of 25 Gun's, were selected. In one of thess 18 Li's of each Gun, all the married women with a living husband, up to age 49, were interviewed. out of 1.052 women interviewed, 145 women were naturally sterile or beyond menopause, and were excluded from thib study. Thus, the analytical population consists of 90 fecundable wives, including those with tubal ligation. A series of analyses were made to examine the relationships between family planning status and selected socio-demographic and communication variables. The family planning status was measured by three indicators, one for each of family planning knowledge, attitude, and practice. The variable for family planning knowledge was created by classifying the respondents into two groups: 1) those who professed to know in detail at least one contraceptive method out of a total of five, including the loop, oral pill, vasectomy, condom, and rhythm, and 2) those who had no professed knowledge about any method. The variable for family planning attitude was dichotomized into those who had favorable attitude toward at least one method among the same list of five, and those who did not have a favorable attitude toward any method. Contraceptive status was classified into two categories of current users and non-users. The independent variables, applied to explain the family planning status, include four sociode-mographie variables and six communication variables. The socio-demographic variables are age, education, number of living children and sons, and ideal number of sons. Communication variables are frequency of exposure to family planning messages through each of the following channels: radio and/or TV, newspaper and/or magazine, 'Happy Home' and/or leaflet, public meeting and/or lecture, family planning worker, and neighbor. Major findings obtained from the analysis are summarized as follows: 1. It was observed that about 33% of the eligible women did not want to have additional children but were not practicing contraception(pong-eem). About half of these women were ever-users and the other half were never-users. They have at least perceived the need for family planning, and thus, should be a primary target population for family planning IEC activities. 2. Socio-demographic variables showed a'closer association with practice than with knowledge or attitude. 3. The communication variables affected family planning status over and above the effects of the socio-demographic variables. When the communication variables were added to the socio-demographic variables as independent variables in the multiple classification analysis, the explained variance was increased by 6.3% in knowledge, 8.7% in attitude, and 4.3% in practice. This also suggests that the communication variables exert larger effects on knowledge and attitude than on practice. Family planning adoption decisions may be influenced by many other factors as well as by family planning knowledge and attitude. 4. The Beta-coefficient was computed for each of the independent variables in multiple classification analysis. Among the media considered in this study, 1) neighborhood communication, radio and/or TV, and 'Happy Home' and/or leaflet had significant effect on family planning knowledge:2) public meetings and/or lecture, radio and/or TV, and neighborhood communication had significant effect on family planning attitude: and 3) radio and/or TV, Happy Home and/or leaflet, and home visit had significant effect on family planning practice. Although program media, neighborhood communication, and radio and/or TV appeared to be more effective than other media, no definite pattern emerged. In the interpretation of these data, however, it should be remembered tha t the frequency of contact varies with the media. 5. When women were exposed to family planning messages more frequently, they tended to have more detailed knowledge about, and more favorable attitudes toward family planning, and were more likely to he practicing family planning. 6. Media behavior differed with age and educational level. It was found that the younger the women and the higher their educational level, the more frequently they were exposed to family planning messages through radio, TV, or printed materials. On the other hand, the older the women and the lower their educational level, the more frequently they were exposed to family planning messages through meetings, home visits, and neighborhood communication. This implies that the audiences' characteristics, such as age and educational level, should be taken into account in the selection of appropriate media.
Summary
On Pattern of Birth and Death in Seoul City.
E Hyock Kwon, Tae Ryong Kim, Hyung Jong Park, Do Suo Koo, Yong Wook Lee, Soon Young Park
Korean J Prev Med. 1968;1(1):9-24.
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AbstractAbstract PDF
A survey was conducted by the staff of the College of Medicine and School of Public Health, Seoul National University in cooperation with Seoul Special City from 1 December 1967 through 28 February 1968, on such events as delivery, death, abortion and pregnancy. The survey directed to a total population of 47,811 residing in 9,157 households led us to the following findings: 1. Two year averages of crude birth rate, crude death rate and natural increase rate were 30.1, 5.6 and 24.5, respectively. 2. Of all deliveries, home and hospital deliveries constituted 61.1 per cent and 35.5 per cent, respectively. 3. Deliveries other than hospital deliveries were found to be attended more often by mother-in-laws(26.5 per cent) than by doctors or midwives(23.4 per cent). 4. About 52 per cent of all women having experiences in pregnancy during the last two years had an experience of consulting a doctor at least one time throughout whole period of pregnancy. 5. In most cases scissors were used to cut umbilical cords, of which 71.0 per cent were not sterilized and only 28.3 per cent sterilized. 6. In many cases placenta was incinerated(48,2 per cent) and on many other occasions it was thrown away into water(28.3 per cent). 7. Cement page(37.4 per cent), gauze and absorbent cotton(29.8 per cent)were found to be most frequently used to receive new-born babies. 8. In 1966 8.8 per cent of the women had at least one abortion induced and in 1967 the percentage was 9.2 per cent. 9. Nearly all(95.8 per cent) of the induced abortions reportedly were done at doctor's clinics. 10. Of all the abortions induced 65.3 per cent were done by specialists in obstetrics, 30.3 per cent by general practitioners and 2.7 per cent by midwives. 11. Those who experienced spontaneous abortions were 1.9 per cent of all women both in 1966 and 1967. 12. About 9.2 per cent of women investigated were found to be currently pregnant. 13. Age specific death rate turned out to be highest among those under 1 year of age. 14. Ten major causes of death in their order of frequency were: 15. Places of death can be classified into homes(75.3 per cent) and hospitals(13.2 per cent). 16. Method of disposing of corpses comprised burials(54.2 per cent) and cremations(44.6 per cent). 17. Infant, neonatal and hebdomadal mortality rates have been computed at 32.2, 18.9 and 13.7, respectively. 18. Infants were found to have died either at homes(81.5 per cent) or at hospitals(18.5 per cent). 19. Birth registrations had been done for about 18.5 per cent of the dead infants.
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JPMPH : Journal of Preventive Medicine and Public Health