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Joong Myung Choi 5 Articles
Association between the Physical Activity of Korean Adolescents and Socioeconomic Status.
In Hwan Oh, Goeun Lee, Chang Mo Oh, Kyung Sik Choi, Bong Keun Choe, Joong Myung Choi, Tai Young Yoon
J Prev Med Public Health. 2009;42(5):305-314.
DOI: https://doi.org/10.3961/jpmph.2009.42.5.305
  • 5,673 View
  • 61 Download
  • 16 Crossref
AbstractAbstract PDF
OBJECTIVES
The physical activity of Korean adolescents and its distribution based on social characteristics have not yet been fully assessed. This study intends to reveal the distribution of physical activity by its subgroups and offer possible explanatory variables. METHODS: The 3rd Korea Youth Risk Behavior Web-based Survey was analyzed for this study. The appropriateness of physical activity was defined by Korea's Health Plan 2010 and physical inactivity was assessed independently. Family affluence scale, parents' education levels, subjective economic status, grade, and school location were considered explanatory variables. All statistical analysis was conducted using SAS ver. 9.1. RESULTS: The proportion of participants engaging in vigorous physical activity was high in males (41.6%), at a low grade (38.5%), within the high family affluence scale group (35.5%). The distribution of participants engaging in moderate physical activity showed similar patterns, but the overall proportion was lower (9.8%). Low family affluence and students with lower subjective economic status reported a higher prevalence of physical inactivity. In multiple logistic regression analysis for physical activity, significant factors included family affluence scale (p<0.05). For physical inactivity, family affluence scale, parents education levels, and subjective economic status were included as significant factors (p<0.05). CONCLUSIONS: The results suggest that the physical activity and inactivity of adolescents may be affected by socioeconomic variables, such as family affluence scale. This implies the need to take proper measures to address these socio-economic inequalities.
Summary

Citations

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  • Self-reported physical activity behaviors of childhood cancer survivors: comparison to a general adolescent population in Korea
    Yohwan Yeo, Ji Won Lee, Dong Wook Shin, Hee Jo Baek, Nack-Gyun Chung, Ki Woong Sung, Yun-Mi Song
    Supportive Care in Cancer.2023;[Epub]     CrossRef
  • Relationships between objective and subjective socioeconomic status and physical health among adolescents in South Korea
    Sue‐Lynn Kim, Joan P. Yoo
    Asian Social Work and Policy Review.2022; 16(2): 197.     CrossRef
  • Family factors associated with physical activity in children with intellectual disability: A systematic review
    Yaru Hao, Rizal Razman
    Journal of Intellectual Disabilities.2022; : 174462952211309.     CrossRef
  • Age moderates the effect of socioeconomic status on physical activity level among south Korean adults: cross-sectional analysis of nationally representative sample
    Harold H. Lee, Ashley E. Pérez, Don Operario
    BMC Public Health.2019;[Epub]     CrossRef
  • Risk factors for disordered weight control behaviors among Korean adolescents: Multilevel analysis of the Korea Youth Risk Behavior Survey
    Yongjoo Kim, S. Bryn Austin, S.V. Subramanian, Jennifer J. Thomas, Kamryn T. Eddy, Debra L. Franko, Rachel F. Rodgers, Ichiro Kawachi
    International Journal of Eating Disorders.2018; 51(2): 124.     CrossRef
  • Lifecourse socioeconomic position indicators and tooth loss in Korean adults
    Dong‐Hun Han, Young‐Ho Khang
    Community Dentistry and Oral Epidemiology.2017; 45(1): 74.     CrossRef
  • Effects of family affluence on the health behaviors of Korean adolescents
    Min H. Park, Eun H. Hwang
    Japan Journal of Nursing Science.2017; 14(3): 173.     CrossRef
  • Factors Influencing the Health-related Quality of Life by Socioeconomic Level during Early Adolescence
    Soo Young Jun, Yeong-Suk Song
    Journal of the Korean Society of School Health.2017; 30(1): 81.     CrossRef
  • Prevalence of Physical Activity and Sitting Time Among South Korean Adolescents
    Eun-Young Lee, Valerie Carson, Justin Y. Jeon, John C. Spence
    Asia Pacific Journal of Public Health.2016; 28(6): 498.     CrossRef
  • Study on Nutritional Knowledge and Food Consumption Differences of Middle School Students living in Rural and Urban Areas of Inner Mongolia
    Ying Li, Youngmi Lee, Nari Park, Haeryun Park
    Journal of the East Asian Society of Dietary Life.2015; 25(6): 933.     CrossRef
  • Health Disparity and Health Welfare among Children from Low-Income Families.
    Hee Soon Kim
    Child Health Nursing Research.2013; 19(4): 247.     CrossRef
  • Mothers’ Working Hours and Children’s Obesity: Data from the Korean National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey, 2008–2010
    Goeun Lee, Hyoung-Ryoul Kim
    Annals of Occupational and Environmental Medicine.2013;[Epub]     CrossRef
  • Socioeconomic status and dyslipidemia in Korean adults: The 2008–2010 Korea National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey
    Ga Eun Nam, Kyung Hwan Cho, Yong Gyu Park, Kyung Do Han, Youn Seon Choi, Seon Mee Kim, Kyung Shik Lee, Byung Joon Ko, Yang Hyun Kim, Byoung Duck Han, Do Hoon Kim
    Preventive Medicine.2013; 57(4): 304.     CrossRef
  • Effects of Objective and Subjective Socioeconomic Status on Self-Rated Health, Depressive Symptoms, and Suicidal Ideation in Adolescents
    Gyeong-Suk Jeon, Yeongmi Ha, Eunsook Choi
    Child Indicators Research.2013; 6(3): 479.     CrossRef
  • Eating Habit, Body Image, and Weight Control Behavior by BMI in Korean Female High School Students - Using Korea Youth Risk Behavior Web-based Survey 2010 Data -
    Mi-Hyun Kim
    The Korean Journal of Food And Nutrition.2012; 25(3): 579.     CrossRef
  • Psychosocial Correlates of Korean Adolescents' Physical Activity Behavior
    Young-Ho Kim, Bradley J. Cardinal
    Journal of Exercise Science & Fitness.2010; 8(2): 97.     CrossRef
The Impacts of Obesity on Psychological Well-being: A Cross-sectional Study about Depressive Mood and Quality of Life.
Ji Yeong Kim, Dong Jae Oh, Tae Young Yoon, Joong Myung Choi, Bong Keun Choe
J Prev Med Public Health. 2007;40(2):191-195.
DOI: https://doi.org/10.3961/jpmph.2007.40.2.191
  • 5,581 View
  • 112 Download
  • 18 Crossref
AbstractAbstract PDF
OBJECTIVES
The aim of this study was to assess whether individuals who visit clinics to ask medical help for obesity treatment depict comparable levels of depression, body dissatisfaction, eating psychopathology and lower quality of life. METHODS: This is a cross sectional study with 534 females who sought treatment for their obesity or overweight being recruited in seven clinical units in Seoul, Korea. The patients group was divided into two groups. The group 1 consisted of the patients with BMI >25 kg/m2. The women who showed BMI < or =25 kg/m2 among patients recruited for this study were classified as the group 2. The control group (group 3) was composed of 398 healthy females who have never tried to lose weight. RESULTS: We found that group 1 had higher frequency of more than moderate level of depression than group 2 and group3 did. Both patients groups showed greater eating disordered attitudes and behaviors regardless of obese condition than the control group. Group1 showed relatively lower level of quality of life than group2 and group3 in terms of the quality of life related to physical well-being. In addition, the control group reported higher quality of life in psychological health than both patients groups did. CONCLUSIONS: In conclusion, it is necessary for clinicians to make a careful evaluation of depressive tendency and eating disorders when obese women seek for medical help. The combination of medical treatment and psychological approach for obese women would result in higher quality of life.
Summary

Citations

Citations to this article as recorded by  
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    Pediatric Exercise Science.2020; 32(2): 97.     CrossRef
  • Making connections: Social identification with new treatment groups for lifestyle management of severe obesity
    Sammyh S. Khan, Mark Tarrant, Katarina Kos, Mark Daly, Chloe Gimbuta, Claire V. Farrow
    Clinical Psychology & Psychotherapy.2020; 27(5): 686.     CrossRef
  • Factors associated with psychological stress and distress among Korean adults: the results from Korea National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey
    Yejin Cheon, Jinju Park, Bo Yoon Jeong, Eun Young Park, Jin-Kyoung Oh, E Hwa Yun, Min Kyung Lim
    Scientific Reports.2020;[Epub]     CrossRef
  • Patient experiences of a bariatric group programme for managing obesity: A qualitative interview study
    Mark Tarrant, Sammyh S. Khan, Claire V. Farrow, Pooja Shah, Mark Daly, Katarina Kos
    British Journal of Health Psychology.2017; 22(1): 77.     CrossRef
  • Validation of the Italian version of the Laval questionnaire: health-related quality of life in subjects with obesity
    Lorenzo Maria Donini, Aldo Rosano, Luca Di Lazzaro, Eleonora Poggiogalle, Carla Lubrano, Silvia Migliaccio, Mariagrazia Carbonelli, Alessandro Pinto, Andrea Lenzi
    Health and Quality of Life Outcomes.2017;[Epub]     CrossRef
  • The Retrospective Analysis on Obese and Overweight Female Patients with Korean Medical Treatment and Its Effectiveness for Clinical Setting of Seasonal Treatment
    Won Yong Shin, Gi Seong Seo, Joo Hyun Song, Cheol Hyun Baek
    Journal of Korean Medicine for Obesity Research.2017; 17(1): 10.     CrossRef
  • The prevalence of obesity in a sample of Egyptian psychiatric patients
    Ahmed Kamel, Hesham Abuhegazy, Ali Ismaila, Khalid Sherra, Mohammed Ramadan, Abdullah Mekky, Ali Al Nabawy
    Egyptian Journal of Psychiatry.2016; 37(3): 157.     CrossRef
  • Comparison of the Association of Excess Weight on Health Related Quality of Life of Women with Polycystic Ovary Syndrome: An Age- and BMI-Matched Case Control Study
    Farnaz Shishehgar, Fahimeh Ramezani Tehrani, Parvin Mirmiran, Sepideh Hajian, Ahmad Reza Baghestani, Stephen L Atkin
    PLOS ONE.2016; 11(10): e0162911.     CrossRef
  • Psychiatric disorders of patients seeking obesity treatment
    Hung-Yen Lin, Chih-Kun Huang, Chi-Ming Tai, Hung-Yu Lin, Yu-Hsi Kao, Ching-Chung Tsai, Chin-Feng Hsuan, Su-Long Lee, Shu-Ching Chi, Yung-Chieh Yen
    BMC Psychiatry.2013;[Epub]     CrossRef
  • Meta‐analysis of the association between body mass index and health‐related quality of life among adults, assessed by the SF‐36
    Zia Ul‐Haq, Daniel F. Mackay, Elisabeth Fenwick, Jill P. Pell
    Obesity.2013;[Epub]     CrossRef
  • Relationships Between Cardiovascular Disease Risk Factors and Depressive Symptoms as Predictors of Cardiovascular Disease Events in Women
    Thomas Rutledge, Sarah E. Linke, B. Delia Johnson, Vera Bittner, David S. Krantz, Carol E. Cornell, Viola Vaccarino, Carl J. Pepine, Eileen M. Handberg, Wafia Eteiba, Leslee J. Shaw, Susmita Parashar, Jo-Ann Eastwood, Diane A. Vido, C. Noel Bairey Merz
    Journal of Women's Health.2012; 21(2): 133.     CrossRef
  • The Relationship between Obesity, Self-esteem and Depressive Symptoms of Adult Women in Korea
    Youn-Jung Son, GiYon Kim
    The Korean Journal of Obesity.2012; 21(2): 89.     CrossRef
  • Role of apathy in the effectiveness of weight management programmes
    C. V. Desouza, P. R. Padala, G. Haynatzki, P. Anzures, C. Demasi, V. Shivaswamy
    Diabetes, Obesity and Metabolism.2012; 14(5): 419.     CrossRef
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    Gianluca Lo Coco, Salvatore Gullo, Laura Salerno, Rosalia Iacoponelli
    Comprehensive Psychiatry.2011; 52(2): 164.     CrossRef
  • Assessing disability in morbidly obese individuals: the Italian Society of Obesity test for obesity-related disabilities
    Lorenzo M. Donini, Amelia Brunani, Anna Sirtori, Claudia Savina, Settimio Tempera, Massimo Cuzzolaro, Giovanni Spera, Veronica Cimolin, Helmer Precilios, Alberto Raggi, Paolo Capodaglio
    Disability and Rehabilitation.2011; 33(25-26): 2509.     CrossRef
  • Maternal and perinatal outcome in obese pregnant patients
    Claire Schrauwers, Gus Dekker
    The Journal of Maternal-Fetal & Neonatal Medicine.2009; 22(3): 218.     CrossRef
  • Psychiatric Comorbidity and Quality of Life in Obese Patients. Results from a Case-Control Study
    Bernardo Carpiniello, Federica Pinna, Gianluca Pillai, Valentina Nonnoi, Enrica Pisano, Silvia Corrias, Maria Germana Orrù, Walter Orrù, Fernanda Velluzzi, Andrea Loviselli
    The International Journal of Psychiatry in Medicine.2009; 39(1): 63.     CrossRef
  • Eating disorder psychopathology does not predict the overweight severity in subjects seeking weight loss treatment
    Giovanni Castellini, Francesco Lapi, Claudia Ravaldi, Alfredo Vannacci, Carlo Maria Rotella, Carlo Faravelli, Valdo Ricca
    Comprehensive Psychiatry.2008; 49(4): 359.     CrossRef
Association of Anthropometric Indices with Prevalence of Hypertension in Korean Adults.
Bong Keun Choe, Lack Seong Son, Tai Young Yoon, Joong Myung Choi, Soon Young Park, Dong Joon Lew
Korean J Prev Med. 1999;32(4):443-451.
  • 2,001 View
  • 23 Download
AbstractAbstract PDF
OBJECTIVE
To examine the relationship between hypertension prevalence and the four commonest anthropometric measurements for obesity(body mass index(BMI), wasit-hip ratio(WHR), waist circumference(WC) and body fat in Korean adults. METHODS: We studied the cross-sectional association of the anthropometric indices and blood pressure in 1,197 individuals( who were participants in the population-based cohort study). Hypertension was defined as blood pressure 160/95 mmHg or current use of antihypertensive medication. Informations on life-style factors were obtained from personal interview. RESULTS: There were close associations between BMI, WHR and WC with blood pressure in both men and women. After age adjustment, BMI and WC showed significantly positive correlation with systolic and diastolic blood pressure levels in both men and women. Odds ratio(ORs) of being hypertensive were estimated comparing the highest to the lowest quantile, adjusting for age, smoking status, alcohol intake levels, education attainment. The simultaneously adjusted ORs of being hypertensive, comparing the highest vs the lowest categories, was for BMI 2.0(95% confidence interval(CI)=0.9-3.2) in men and 3.2 (95% CI=1.7-6.1) in women, for WC 2.1(95% CI=1.0-4.4) in men and 3.1(95% CI=1.6-5.9) in women, for fat(%) 4.2(95% CI=1.9-9.5) in men and 2.1(95% CI=1.2-3.6) in women. CONCLUSION: In addition to measures of overall obesity(BMI) as well as central obesity(WHR, WC), body fat(%) was independently associated with prevalence of hypertension. Among obesity indices, body fat was the most predictor variable in hypertensive state in male and BMI was in female.
Summary
A Study on the Body Fatness and Lifestyles of Some Medical Students.
Dong Kee Ahn, Joong Myung Choi, Tai Young Yoon, Dong Joon Lew, Soon Young Park
Korean J Prev Med. 1995;28(1):85-102.
  • 1,909 View
  • 19 Download
AbstractAbstract PDF
This study was carried out to evaluate the associations between lifestyles and Body Mass Index in a group of 349 male and 65 female medical students, ages 17 to 31 years. 20.0% of male students and 3.1% of female student showed the over weight in the classification of obesity by Japan Society for Study of Obesity. There was no statistically significance in the comparison of the height body weight, body mass index, obesity index and body fat(%) according to grade in both sexes. But male students showed increasing tendency of waist-hip ratio with grade. According to obesity category, there was significant difference in the comparison of body weight, body mass index , obesity index, waist-hip ratio and body fat(%), but height. Body mass index was positively related with waist-hip ratio(r=0.6150, p=0.0001) and fat(%)(r=0.5101, p=0.0001) in males and waist-hip ratio (r=0.4734, p=0.001) and fat(%)(r=0.4522, p=0.002)in females. This study provides an opportunity to further examine the relationship of sociodemographic factors and health behaviors to obesity, and suggest the basic concept to match the obesity study to general eqidemiological cohort studies for controlling of chronic adult diseases.
Summary
Statistical Studies on the Gestation and Delivery on the Pregnant Women and on the Neonates.
Joong Myung Choi
Korean J Prev Med. 1984;17(1):193-202.
  • 1,555 View
  • 21 Download
AbstractAbstract PDF
Clinical and statistical observations were performed on 1,930 cases of pregnant women who were admitted for delivery in the Department of Obstetrics, Kyung Hee University Hospital during 1 year (1982) and on 1,961 cases of neonates who were born to the former. The results were obtained as follows: 1. Concerning maternal age distribution, the commonest age group was that of 25~29 and the proportion of the age group 20-29 was 82.4% of all. 2 Concerning obstetrical history, the proportion of the women who had no prior experience of delivery nor abortion was the highest, 45.5%. 3. Concerning abortion history, 36.1% of the women had experienced it and the mean number was 1.8. 4. Type of delivery was as follows: Spontaneous delivery; 58.1%, Vacuum extracted delivery; 22.4%, Cesarean section; 18.8%, Breech delivery; 0.7%. 5. Gestational period distribution of the neonates was as follows: Under 37 weeks (Preterm); 7.1%, Between 38 and 42 weeks (Terms); 87.2%, More than 43 weeks (Postterm); 5.7%. 6. Sex ratio of male to female of the neonates was 1.03 : 1. 7. Birth weight distribution was as follows: Under 2,500gm.; 9.0%, Between 2,501 and 4,000gm.; 85.5%, More than 4,001gm.; 5.5%. 8. The measured growth data of neonates were as follows: Body weight; 3.28kg. for male, 3.18kg. for female, Body height; 50.40cm for male, 49.77cm for female, Chest circumference; 32.54cm for male, 32.17cm for female, Head circumference; 33.49cm for male, 33.11cm for female. 9. The mean values of Apgar score per 1 minute were 7.70 for male and 7.63 for female. 10. The incidence rate of neonatal jaundice was 50.0% and no difference in sex respectively, but more prevalent in preterm baby. 11. The incidence rate of neonatal diseases was 8.9% and the commonest disease was neonatal infection (35.6%). 12. Concerning multiple pregnancy, ratio to single births was 1 : 64.3 and the sex ratio of male to female was 1 : 1.03. 13. The incidence rate of congenital anomaly was 2.4% and the commonest anomaly was digestive system anomaly (30.9%). 14. The neonatal mortality rate was 11.73 per 1,000 neonates, and the majority of neonatal deaths were in low birth weight and preterm neonates (78.3%). 15. The causes of neonatal deaths in decreasing order of frequency were abnormal ventilation (39.1%), prematurity (30.4%), congenital anomaly (13.0%) and etc.
Summary

JPMPH : Journal of Preventive Medicine and Public Health