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JPMPH : Journal of Preventive Medicine and Public Health

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Kwan Hyung Yi 2 Articles
A study on the attitude affecting the preventive behavior for hearing conservation.
Kyung Yong Rhee, Kwan Hyung Yi
Korean J Prev Med. 1996;29(2):371-384.
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The purpose of this study is to investigate attitude factor related to hearing conservation and to find attitude affecting the preventive behavior for hearing conservation. The research method used in this study was self-administered questionnaire samples of the study were composed of 353 workers exposed noise selected randomly in 10 ship-building manufacturing companies. Authors extracted following 9 factors related hearing conservation from 26 attitude propositions prepared from previous study results and health belief model; (l) general perceived susceptibility, (2) relative perceived susceptibility compared with colleagues, (3) concern to the personal protective devices, (4) perceived severity and concern to the hearing capacity, (5) concern to the hearing and noise assessment, (6) concern to the control noise and hearing conservation, (7) group pressure and reason of wearing protective devices, (8) apathy of hearing loss from noise, (9) knowledge about hearing conservation Attitude factors affecting the preventive health behavior were general perceived susceptibility, concern to the noise control and hearing conservation, and concern to the personal protective devices in the case of wearing personal protective devices. But in the case of avoiding noise exposure as preventive health behavior, perceived severity and concern to the hearing capacity was a significant attitude factor with knowledge about hearing conservation.
Summary
Shiftwork and Sickness Absence in Korean Manufacturing Industries.
Jung Sun Park, Domyung Paek, Ki Beom Lee, Kyung Yong Rhee, Kwan Hyung Yi
Korean J Prev Med. 1994;27(3):475-486.
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In order to provide necessary information for better health of workers through understanding the actual status of the industries adopting shift systems. The data were gathered from a stratified random sample of 347(0.5%) firms selected out of about 70,000 manufacturing industries throughout the nation in 1993 stratification during sampling was by industrial group and number of workers. The major findings obtained from 288 firms surveyed completely were as follows: 1. About 20.2% of the 288 firms were adopting shift systems and shiftworkers accounted for about 25.1% of the total work force in 288 firms. 2. The bigger number of workers was, the higher the adopting rate of shift system was. 3. The rate of having welfare facilities such as dining room, commuting bus, washing facilities, and health care room etc. was higher in the industries adopting shift systems. 4. The major industrial groups adopting shift systems were the rubber & plastic goods manufacturing industry (54.1 per 100 firms) and the textile manufacturing industry (44.8 per 100 firms). However the proportion of shiftworkers was higher in the textile manufacturing industry (70.5 per 100 firms) and the electronics industry (57.9 per 100 firms). 5. The most predominant work schedule was the weekly rotating, semi-continuos 2-crew 2-shift system (47.5%). 6. In the industries adopting shift systems, shiftworkefs had an adjusted average of 0.29 spells per 100 workers (O.14-0.45 in 95% C.I) compared to 0.23 spells per 100 nonshift dayworkers (0.15-0.31 in 95% C.I) for 1 month. 7. Also in the industries adopting shift systems, the adjusted average annual turn-over rate of shiftworkers was 13.07 per 100 workers (12.03-14.12 in 95% C.I) compared to 10.18 per 100 nonshift dayworkers(9.53-10.82 in 95% C.I).
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JPMPH : Journal of Preventive Medicine and Public Health