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Sang-Soo Bae 2 Articles
Origins and Evolution of Social Medicine and Contemporary Social Medicine in Korea
Dal Sun Han, Sang-Soo Bae, Dong-Hyun Kim, Yong-jun Choi
J Prev Med Public Health. 2017;50(3):141-157.   Published online April 16, 2017
DOI: https://doi.org/10.3961/jpmph.16.106
  • 7,882 View
  • 234 Download
  • 7 Crossref
AbstractAbstract PDFSupplementary Material
Social medicine is recognized as one of medical specialties in many countries. However, social medicine has never been formally introduced to Korea, presumably because the term and its principles were not accepted for some years in the past in American medicine, which has strongly influenced Korean medicine. This paper describes the origins and evolution of social medicine and briefly discusses contemporary social medicine in Korea. Social medicine was initiated in France and Germany in 1848. Since then, it has expanded globally and developed in diverse ways. Included in core principles of social medicine is that social and economic conditions have important effects on health and disease, and that these relationships must be subjected to scientific investigation. The term ‘social medicine’ is rarely used in Korea, but many of its subject matters are incorporated into preventive medicine which, besides prevention, deals with population health that is inescapably social. However, the Korean preventive medicine directs little attention to the basic concepts and principles of social medicine, upon which systematic development of social medicine can be based. Thus, it is necessary to supplement the social medicine contents of preventive medicine through formalizing the linkages between the two fields. One way of doing so would be to change the title of ‘preventive medicine’ course in medical colleges to ‘preventive and social medicine,’ as in many other countries, and to adjust the course contents accordingly.
Summary

Citations

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    Beate Muschalla, Stefanie Baron, Theresa Klevers
    Social Psychiatry and Psychiatric Epidemiology.2022; 57(7): 1505.     CrossRef
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    Anant Jani, Harshana Liyanage, Uy Hoang, Lucy Moore, Filipa Ferreira, Ivelina Yonova, Victoria Tzortziou Brown, Simon de Lusignan
    BMJ Open.2020; 10(9): e037681.     CrossRef
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    Journal of the Royal Society of Medicine.2019; 112(11): 459.     CrossRef
  • Influence of an art museum visit on individuals’ psychological and physiological indicators of stress
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    Museums & Social Issues.2019; 14(1-2): 45.     CrossRef
Older Adults’ Perception of Chronic Illness Management in South Korea
Minah Kang, Jaiyong Kim, Sang-Soo Bae, Yong-Jun Choi, Dong-Soo Shin
J Prev Med Public Health. 2014;47(4):236-243.   Published online July 31, 2014
DOI: https://doi.org/10.3961/jpmph.2014.47.4.236
  • 10,888 View
  • 119 Download
  • 10 Crossref
AbstractAbstract PDF
Objectives
Despite the recent emphasis on a patient-centered chronic care model, few studies have investigated its use in older adults in South Korea. We explored how older Korean adults perceive and cope with their chronic illness. Methods: We conducted focus group interviews in Seoul, Korea in January 2010. Focus groups were formed by disease type (hypertension and type 2 diabetes) and gender using purposive sampling. Inclusion criteria were patients aged 60 and over who had been diagnosed with diabetes or hypertension and received care at a community health center for at least six months prior to participation. Interview data were analyzed through descriptive content analysis. Results: Among personal factors, most participants felt overwhelmed when they received their diagnosis. However, with time and control of their acute symptoms using medication, their worry diminished and participants tended to denying being identified as a patient or sick person. Among socio-familial factors, participants reported experiencing stigma with their chronic illness and feeling it was a symbol of weakness. Instead of modifying their lifestyles, which might interfere with their social relationships, they resorted to only following their medicine regime prescribed by their doctor. Participants also reported feeling that their doctor only prescribed medications and acted in an authoritative and threatening manner to induce and reinforce participants’ compliance with treatment. Conclusions: For successful patient-centered management of chronic illnesses, supportive environments that include family, friends, and healthcare providers should be established.
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Citations

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    Healthcare.2023; 11(18): 2569.     CrossRef
  • Patient Perspectives of Chronic Disease Management and Unmet Care Needs in South Korea: A Qualitative Study
    Kyunghee Yi, Sujin Kim
    Journal of Patient Experience.2023;[Epub]     CrossRef
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    Bahtiar Bahtiar, Junaiti Sahar, sWiwin Wiarsih
    Frontiers of Nursing.2022; 9(1): 87.     CrossRef
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    Eunkyo Kang, Soojeong Kim, Ye E Rhee, Young H Yun
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    Hyun-E Yeom
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    Kawoun Seo, Youngshin Song
    Journal of Clinical Nursing.2019; 28(9-10): 1794.     CrossRef
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    Daniel David, Joanne Dalton, Cherlie Magny-Normilus, Maura Moran Brain, Tyler Linster, Sei J. Lee
    Diabetes Spectrum.2019; 32(2): 132.     CrossRef
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    Siyan Yi, Chanrith Ngin, Sovannary Tuot, Pheak Chhoun, Tyler Fleming, Carinne Brody
    International Journal of Mental Health Systems.2017;[Epub]     CrossRef
  • Developing a culturally tailored stroke prevention walking programme for Korean immigrant seniors: a focus group study
    Sarah E. Choi, Ivy Kwon, Emiley Chang, Daniel Araiza, Carol Lee Thorpe, Catherine A. Sarkisian
    International Journal of Older People Nursing.2016; 11(4): 255.     CrossRef
  • Type 2 Diabetes Patients and Stigma:
    Asuka Kato
    Iryo To Shakai.2016; 26(2): 197.     CrossRef

JPMPH : Journal of Preventive Medicine and Public Health