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Soong Nang Jang 12 Articles
The Impact of Socioeconomic Factors on the Gender Differences of Disability and Subjective Health Among Elderly Koreans.
Gyeong Suk Jeon, Soong Nang Jang, Seon Ja Rhee
J Prev Med Public Health. 2009;42(3):199-207.
DOI: https://doi.org/10.3961/jpmph.2009.42.3.199
  • 4,713 View
  • 55 Download
  • 9 Crossref
AbstractAbstract PDF
OBJECTIVES
Research on the gender differences of health among older Korean people has been limited compared with the research for other stages of life. This study first examined the patterns and magnitude of the gender differences of health in later life. Second, we examined the gender differences in the health of older men and women that were attributable to differing socioeconomic conditions. METHODS: Using the nationally representative 2005 Korean National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey, the gender differences in disability and subjective poor health were assessed by calculating the age adjusted and gender-specific prevalence. Logistic regression analyses were used to assess if the differences between the men and women for health could be explained by differential exposure to socioeconomic factors and/or the differential vulnerability of men and women to these socioeconomic factors. RESULTS: Our results indicated that older women were more likely than the men to report disability and poor subjective health. The health disadvantage of older women was diminished by differential experiences with socioeconomic factors, and especially education. The differences shrink as much as 43.7% in the case of disability and 35.4% in the case of poor subjective health by the differential exposure to educational attainment. Any differential vulnerability to socioeconomic factors was not found between the men and women, which means that socioeconomic factors may have similar effect on health in both genders. CONCLUSIONS: Differential socioeconomic experience and exposure between the men and women might cause gender difference in health in old age Koreans.
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  • Socioeconomic Inequalities in Depressive Symptoms among Korean Older Men and Women: Contribution of Social Support Resources
    Jeong Lee, Kyungwon Choi, Gyeong-Suk Jeon
    Journal of Korean Academy of Community Health Nursing.2020; 31(1): 13.     CrossRef
  • Predictive Model for Quality of Life of the Older Men Living Alone
    Su Jin Kim, Gyeong-Suk Jeon
    Journal of Korean Academy of Nursing.2020; 50(6): 799.     CrossRef
  • Care inequality: care received according to gender, marital status, and socioeconomic status among Korean older adults with disability
    Soong-nang Jang, Ichiro Kawachi
    International Journal for Equity in Health.2019;[Epub]     CrossRef
  • The effects of medication adherence and health literacy on health‐related quality of life in older people with hypertension
    Nam Hee Park, Mi Sook Song, So Young Shin, Ji‐hye Jeong, Hyo Young Lee
    International Journal of Older People Nursing.2018;[Epub]     CrossRef
  • Socioeconomic and Social Support Factors of Malnutrition among Korean Elderly in the Community
    Su-Jin Kim, Gyeong-Suk Jeon
    The Korean Journal of Health Service Management.2017; 11(3): 79.     CrossRef
  • Activities of Daily Living, Depression, and Self-rated Health and Related Factors in Korean Elderly: Focused on Socioeconomic Status and Family Support
    Seieun Oh, Young Ko
    Journal of Korean Academy of Community Health Nursing.2015; 26(2): 140.     CrossRef
  • Perceived Health, Life Satisfaction, and Cardiovascular Risk Factors Among Elderly Korean Immigrants and Elderly Koreans
    Mo-Kyung Sin, Young-Ran Chae, Myoung-Ae Choe, Patrick Murphy, Jeungim Kim, Mi-Yang Jeon
    Journal of Gerontological Nursing.2011; 37(3): 43.     CrossRef
  • Analysis for the Impact of Adulthood and Childhood Socioeconomic Positions and Intergenerational Social Mobility on Adulthood Health
    Jae-Hee Seo, Ho Kim, Young-Jeon Shin
    Journal of Preventive Medicine and Public Health.2010; 43(2): 138.     CrossRef
  • Trends in the Health Status of Older Koreans
    Soong‐Nang Jang, Dong‐Hyun Kim
    Journal of the American Geriatrics Society.2010; 58(3): 592.     CrossRef
Subjective Satisfaction with Medical Care among Older People: Comprehensiveness, General Satisfaction and Accessibility.
Hwa Joon Kim, Young Koh, Eun Jeong Chun, Soong Nang Jang, Chang Yup Kim
J Prev Med Public Health. 2009;42(1):35-41.
DOI: https://doi.org/10.3961/jpmph.2009.42.1.35
  • 4,573 View
  • 46 Download
  • 4 Crossref
AbstractAbstract PDF
OBJECTIVES
The changing population age structure and rapidly increasing medical costs make providing high-quality, effective medical care for the elderly a challenge. This study assessed the satisfaction with medical care in terms of comprehensiveness, general satisfaction, and accessibility among community-dwelling Korean elders. METHODS: Data were obtained from a nationwide representative sample of the older adults(aged 65 years old or older) living in the community, who participated in a 2006 telephone survey conducted using random digit dialing (n=881). General satisfaction, comprehensiveness and accessibility were measured using a 10-item satisfaction survey questionnaire. Descriptive analysis was used to assess the distribution of each of three components of subjective satisfaction. Analysis of covariance (ANCOVA) was used to examine the association of each of the three components with socioeconomic variables. RESULTS: Comprehensiveness and general satisfaction were low among older people with a high socioeconomic status. Accessibility was evaluated as low among older people of low socioeconomic status, those living in rural areas and those who were medical aid beneficiaries. CONCLUSIONS: Urgent interventions should be considered in order to improve accessibility to medical care for elders of low socioeconomic status and those living in rural communities. Given the rapid aging of the population, we need to develop a monitoring system to improve the quality of geriatric care.
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  • Optimization and Adjustment of Multilevel Medical Facilities for the Elderly from the Perspective of Accessibility
    Yanyan Gao, Zao Li
    Journal of Urban Planning and Development.2022;[Epub]     CrossRef
  • The Gap Between Physicians and the Public in Satisfaction with the National Health Insurance System in Korea
    Kye-Hyun Kim, Eun-Cheol Park, Myung-Il Hahm
    Journal of Korean Medical Science.2012; 27(6): 579.     CrossRef
  • The Rehabilitation Services Utilization of People with Disabilities in a Rural Area
    Gyeong-Jin Choi, Keon-Yeop Kim, Duck-Hee Lee, Chang-Hyun Han, Se-Mook Choi
    Journal of agricultural medicine and community health.2011; 36(4): 227.     CrossRef
  • Patient care encounters with the MCHL: a questionnaire study
    Mayvor Ström, Amir Baigi, Cathrine Hildingh, Bengt Mattsson, Bertil Marklund
    Scandinavian Journal of Caring Sciences.2011; 25(3): 517.     CrossRef
Multiple Roles and Health among Korean Women.
Su Jin Cho, Soong Nang Jang, Sung Il Cho
J Prev Med Public Health. 2008;41(5):355-363.
DOI: https://doi.org/10.3961/jpmph.2008.41.5.355
  • 5,125 View
  • 51 Download
  • 7 Crossref
AbstractAbstract PDF
OBJECTIVES
Most studies about multiple roles and women's health suggested that combining with paid job, being married and having children was more likely to improve health status than in case of single or traditional roles. We investigated whether there was better health outcome in multiple roles among Korean women coinciding with previous studies of other nations. METHODS: Data were from the 2005 Korea National Health & Nutritional Examination Survey, a subsample of women aged 25-59 years (N=2,943). Health status was assessed for self-rated poor health, perceived stress and depression, respectively based on one questionnaire item. The age-standardized prevalence of all health outcomes were calculated by role categories and socioeconomic status. Multiple logistic regression was used to assess the association of self rated health, perceived stress, and depression with multiple roles adjusted for age, education, household income, number of children and age of children. RESULTS: Having multiple roles with working role was not associated with better health and psychological wellbeing. Compared to those with traditional roles, employed women more frequently experienced perceived stress, with marital and/or parental roles. Non-working single mothers suffered depression more often than women with traditional roles or other role occupancy. Socioeconomic status indicators were potent independent correlates of self-rated health and perceived stress. CONCLUSIONS: Employment of women with other roles did not confer additional health benefit to traditional family responsibility. Juggling of work and family responsibility appeared more stressful than traditional unemployed parental and marital role in Korean women.
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  • Comparison of Health Behaviors and Nutrient Intake according to Work Type among Women Aged 30-60 Years: Using Data from the Korea National Health and Nutrition Survey (2015-2018)
    Sol Lee, Bok-Mi Jung
    The Korean Journal of Community Living Science.2024; 35(1): 61.     CrossRef
  • Effects of Women’s Work-Family Multiple Role and Role Combination on Depressive Symptoms in Korea
    Ji-won Kang, Soong-nang Jang
    International Journal of Environmental Research and Public Health.2020; 17(4): 1249.     CrossRef
  • Working Poverty and Health Disparities in Korean Workers
    Jin-Hwa Lee, Bokim Lee
    Journal of Korean Academy of Community Health Nursing.2020; 31(4): 514.     CrossRef
  • Relationship between the number of family members and stress by gender: Cross-sectional analysis of the fifth Korea National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey
    Jin-Won Noh, Kyoung-Beom Kim, Jumin Park, Janghun Hong, Young Dae Kwon, Massimo Ciccozzi
    PLOS ONE.2017; 12(9): e0184235.     CrossRef
  • Unequal Geographic Distribution of Life Expectancy in Seoul
    Sangmi Kim, Seonju Yi, Meekyung Kim, Bokyung Kim, Hwayoung Lee, Taekryeon Jeon, Youngtae Cho
    Asia Pacific Journal of Public Health.2015; 27(2): NP1002.     CrossRef
  • Post‐partum blues among Korean mothers: A structural equation modelling approach
    Sung Suk Chung, Il Young Yoo, Kyoung Hwa Joung
    International Journal of Mental Health Nursing.2013; 22(4): 359.     CrossRef
  • Depression of married and employed women based on social-role theory
    Insook Cho, Sukhee Ahn, Souk Young Kim, Young Sook Park, Hae Won Kim, Sun Ok Lee, Sook Hee Lee, Chae Weon Chung
    Journal of Korean Academy of Nursing.2012; 42(4): 496.     CrossRef
Socioeconomic Disparities in Breast Cancer Screening among US Women: Trends from 2000 to 2005.
Jaeyoung Kim, Soong Nang Jang
J Prev Med Public Health. 2008;41(3):186-194.
DOI: https://doi.org/10.3961/jpmph.2008.41.3.186
  • 5,447 View
  • 84 Download
  • 44 Crossref
AbstractAbstract PDF
OBJECTIVES
This study describes trends in the socioeconomic disparities in breast cancer screening among US women aged 40 or over, from 2000 to 2005. We assessed 1) the disparities in each socioeconomic dimension; 2) the changes in screening mammography rates over time according to income, education, and race; and 3) the sizes and trends of the disparities over time. METHODS: Using data from the Behavioral Risk Factor Surveillance System (BRFSS) from 2000 to 2005, we calculated the age-adjusted screening rate according to relative household income, education level, health insurance, and race. Odds ratios and the relative inequality index (RII) were also calculated, controlling for age. RESULTS: Women in their 40s and those with lower relative incomes were less likely to undergo screening mammography. The disparity based on relative income was greater than that based on education or race (the RII among low-income women across the survey years was 3.00 to 3.48). The overall participation rate and absolute differences among socioeconomic groups changed little or decreased slightly across the survey years. However, the degree of each socioeconomic disparity and the relative inequality among socioeconomic positions remained quite consistent. CONCLUSIONS: These findings suggest that the trend of the disparity in breast cancer screening varied by socioeconomic dimension. ontinued differences in breast cancer screening rates related to income level should be considered in future efforts to decrease the disparities in breast cancer among socioeconomic groups. More focused interventions, as well as the monitoring of trends in cancer screening participation by income and education, are needed in different social settings.
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    Mariko Ando, Aki Yazawa, Ichiro Kawachi
    Social Science & Medicine.2024; 340: 116443.     CrossRef
  • Effect of residence in nonmetropolitan counties on stage and tumor size at diagnosis in patients with breast cancer: A Surveillance, Epidemiology, and End Results analysis
    Jorge Benavides‐Vasquez, Chan Shen, Alicia McDonald, Li Wang
    The Journal of Rural Health.2023; 39(2): 408.     CrossRef
  • Factors Associated With Breast Cancer Screening Behaviors Among Women With Dense Breasts
    Matthew M Miller, Ramapriya Ganti, Kathy Repich, James T Patrie, Roger T Anderson, Jennifer A Harvey
    Journal of Breast Imaging.2023;[Epub]     CrossRef
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    Helena Teng, Wilfred Dang, Belinda Curpen
    Tomography.2022; 8(5): 2171.     CrossRef
  • Patient Characteristics Associated With Patient-Reported Deterrents to Adjunct Breast Cancer Screening of Patients With Dense Breasts
    Matthew M. Miller, Kathy Repich, James T. Patrie, Roger T. Anderson, Jennifer A. Harvey
    American Journal of Roentgenology.2021; 217(5): 1069.     CrossRef
  • Women’s Views on Multifactorial Breast Cancer Risk Assessment and Risk-Stratified Screening: A Population-Based Survey from Four Provinces in Canada
    Cynthia Mbuya Bienge, Nora Pashayan, Jennifer Brooks, Michel Dorval, Jocelyne Chiquette, Laurence Eloy, Annie Turgeon, Laurence Lambert-Côté, Jean-Sébastien Paquette, Emmanuelle Lévesque, Julie Hagan, Meghan Walker, Julie Lapointe, Gratien Dalpé, Palmira
    Journal of Personalized Medicine.2021; 11(2): 95.     CrossRef
  • Impact of the COVID-19 pandemic on breast cancer screening volumes and patient screening behaviors
    Matthew M. Miller, Max O. Meneveau, Carrie M. Rochman, Anneke T. Schroen, Courtney M. Lattimore, Patricia A. Gaspard, Richard S. Cubbage, Shayna L. Showalter
    Breast Cancer Research and Treatment.2021; 189(1): 237.     CrossRef
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    Yasuhiro Toyoda, Kota Katanoda, Kanako Ishii, Hitoshi Yamamoto, Takahiro Tabuchi
    Breast Cancer.2021; 28(6): 1340.     CrossRef
  • Influencia de la vía diagnóstica en la clínica y el uso de terapias no convencionales en mujeres con cáncer de mama de la cohorte DAMA
    Isabel Torá-Rocamora, Jaume Grau, Blanca Oliver-Vall-llosera, Xavier Bargalló, Marta Aldea, Rosa Puigpinós-Riera
    Gaceta Sanitaria.2020; 34(2): 157.     CrossRef
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    Monica Shah, Ambica Parmar, Kelvin K. W. Chan
    Cancer Medicine.2020; 9(10): 3407.     CrossRef
  • Financial Hardship, Healthcare Utilization, and Health Among U.S. Cancer Survivors
    Zhiyuan Zheng, Xuesong Han, Jingxuan Zhao, Matthew P. Banegas, Reginald Tucker-Seeley, Ashish Rai, Stacey A. Fedewa, Weishan Song, Ahmedin Jemal, K. Robin Yabroff
    American Journal of Preventive Medicine.2020; 59(1): 68.     CrossRef
  • The breast cancer paradox: A systematic review of the association between area-level deprivation and breast cancer screening uptake in Europe
    Dinah Smith, Katie Thomson, Clare Bambra, Adam Todd
    Cancer Epidemiology.2019; 60: 77.     CrossRef
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    Sebastian A. Rodriguez-Torres, Anne Marie McCarthy, Wei He, Jeffrey M. Ashburner, Sanja Percac-Lima
    Health Equity.2019; 3(1): 205.     CrossRef
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    Janette Yung, Jiehui Li, Hannah T. Jordan, James E. Cone
    Preventive Medicine Reports.2018; 11: 81.     CrossRef
  • Socioeconomic Inequalities in Stomach Cancer Screening in Korea, 2005–2015: After the Introduction of the National Cancer Screening Program
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    Yonsei Medical Journal.2018; 59(8): 923.     CrossRef
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    Journal of the American College of Radiology.2017; 14(2): 157.     CrossRef
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    PLOS ONE.2015; 10(12): e0145492.     CrossRef
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    Jada G. Hamilton, Nancy Breen, Carrie N. Klabunde, Richard P. Moser, Bryan Leyva, Erica S. Breslau, Sarah C. Kobrin
    Cancer Epidemiology, Biomarkers & Prevention.2015; 24(1): 3.     CrossRef
  • Association Between Individual and Geographic Factors and Nonadherence to Mammography Screening Guidelines
    Kevin A Henry, Kaila McDonald, Recinda Sherman, Anita Y Kinney, Antoinette M Stroup
    Journal of Women's Health.2014; 23(8): 664.     CrossRef
  • Barriers to Cancer Screening among Medical Aid Program Recipients in the Republic of Korea: A Qualitative Study
    Yoon Young Lee, Jae Kwan Jun, Mina Suh, BoYoung Park, Yeol Kim, Kui Son Choi
    Asian Pacific Journal of Cancer Prevention.2014; 15(2): 589.     CrossRef
  • Changes in access to screening mammography, 2008–2011
    Elena B. Elkin, J. Paige Nobles, Laura C. Pinheiro, Coral L. Atoria, Deborah Schrag
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    Runhua Shi, Glenn Mills, Jerry McLarty, Gary Burton, Zhenzhen Shi, Jonathan Glass
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    Samiratou Ouédraogo, Tienhan Sandrine Dabakuyo, Julie Gentil, Marie-Laure Poillot, Vincent Dancourt, Patrick Arveux
    European Journal of Cancer Prevention.2013; 22(2): 103.     CrossRef
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    Elisabeth A. Donaldson, David R. Holtgrave, Renea A. Duffin, Frances Feltner, William Funderburk, Harold P. Freeman
    Cancer.2012; 118(19): 4851.     CrossRef
  • Use of Annual Mammography Among Older Women with Ductal Carcinoma In Situ
    Phyllis Brawarsky, Bridget A. Neville, Garrett M. Fitzmaurice, Michael J. Hassett, Jennifer S. Haas
    Journal of General Internal Medicine.2012; 27(5): 500.     CrossRef
  • Characteristics of women using organized or opportunistic breast cancer screening in France. Analysis of the 2006 French Health, Health Care and Insurance Survey
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    Southern Medical Journal.2012; 105(10): 508.     CrossRef
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    Rebecca Lobb, Kelly Morrison Opdyke, Cheryl J. McDonnell, Mary Grace Pagaduan, Marc Hurlbert, Kathryn Gates-Ferris, Banghee Chi, Jennifer D. Allen
    American Journal of Preventive Medicine.2011; 40(5): 561.     CrossRef
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Certificate Education for Geriatric Physician: Satisfaction and Feasibility.
Sung Chun Lee, Hwa Joon Kim, Hyung Joon Park, Jong Lull Yun, Chang Yup Kim, Ok Ryun Moon, Soong Nang Jang
J Prev Med Public Health. 2008;41(1):10-16.
DOI: https://doi.org/10.3961/jpmph.2008.41.1.10
  • 4,101 View
  • 30 Download
  • 1 Crossref
AbstractAbstract PDF
OBJECTIVES
Korea faces a number of challenges to meet demands in the area of geriatric professional medicine in a country with a rapidly ageing population. We evaluated the satisfaction and feasibility of the current education certification for geriatric physicians. METHODS: Geriatric physicians who were deemed qualified by the Korean Geriatrics Society during the period of 2001 to 2005 (n=2,200) were asked to complete structured questionnaires sent to them by mail about their satisfaction of and need for certificates of education, as well as their opinions on their geriatric specialty training. A total of 419 physicians responded. Descriptive analysis and hierarchical regression were performed to rate the respondents.satisfaction, the characteristics of the need for clarity and utility in education certification, and the characteristics of their patients. RESULTS: Although most respondents were satisfied with their education certification, those who had more elderly patients, aged 65 or older, and those who had more cognitively impaired patients, rated their education as significantly lower than did other physicians. Both groups expressed the need for more the comprehensive care and assessment concerning of their education. Multiple regression analysis indicated that satisfaction with geriatric physician qualification was associated with a physician's age, specialty, and percentage of elderly patients. CONCLSIONS: This study suggests that the current system of education certification is limited in terms of feasibility and physician satisfaction.
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  • Is socioeconomic disparity in disability improving among Korean elders?
    Soong-Nang Jang, Sung-il Cho, Ichiro Kawachi
    Social Science & Medicine.2010; 71(2): 282.     CrossRef
Trend of Socioeconomic Inequality in Participation in Cervical Cancer Screening among Korean Women.
Soong Nang Jang, Sung il Cho, Seung Sik Hwang, Kyunghee Jung-Choi, So Young Im, Ji Ae Lee, Minah Kang Kim
J Prev Med Public Health. 2007;40(6):505-511.
DOI: https://doi.org/10.3961/jpmph.2007.40.6.505
  • 5,147 View
  • 74 Download
  • 15 Crossref
AbstractAbstract PDF
OBJECTIVES
While cervical cancer is one of the leading cancers among women worldwide, there are a number of effective early detection tests available. However, the participation rates in cervical cancer screening among Korean women remain low. After the nationwide efforts in 1988 and thereafter to encourage participation in cervical cancer screening, few studies have investigated the effects of socioeconomic inequality on participation in cervical cancer screening. The purpose of this study was to investigate 1) the level of socioeconomic disparities in receiving cervical cancer screening by age group and 2) if there was an improvement in reducing these disparities between 1995 and 2001. METHODS: Using data from the Korean National Health Status, Health Behavior and Belief Survey in 1995, and the Korean National Health and Nutrition Examination Surveys from 1998 and 2001 (sample sizes of 2,297, 3,738, and 3,283), age-standardized participation rates were calculated according to education level, equivalized household income, and job status. Odds ratios and the relative inequality index (RII) were also calculated after controlling for age. RESULTS: Women with lower education levels were less likely to attend the screening test, and the disparities by education level were most pronounced among women aged 60 years and older. The RIIs among women 60 years and older were 3.64, 4.46, and 8.64 in 1995, 1998, and 2001, respectively. Higher rates of participation were reported among those in the highest income category, which was more notable among the middle aged women (40s and 50s). An inconsistent trend in the rate of participation in cervical cancer screening by occupational level was found. CONCLUSIONS: Indicators of socioeconomic position seem to have varying impacts on the inequalities in the rates of participation in cervical cancer screening according to age group. These results demonstrate the need for more aggressive and age-based interventions and policy programs to eliminate the remaining inequalities.
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A Review on Socioeconomic Position Indicators in Health Inequality Research.
Yong Jun Choi, Baek Geun Jeong, Sung Il Cho, Kyunghee Jung-Choi, Soong Nang Jang, Minah Kang, Young Ho Khang
J Prev Med Public Health. 2007;40(6):475-486.
DOI: https://doi.org/10.3961/jpmph.2007.40.6.475
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AbstractAbstract PDF
OBJECTIVES
Socioeconomic position (SEP) refers to the socioeconomic factors that influence which position an individual or group of people will hold within the structure of a society. In this study, we provide a comprehensive review of various indicators of SEP, including education level, occupation-based SEP, income and wealth, area SEP, lifecourse SEP, and SEP indicators for women, elderly and youth. METHODS AND RESULTS: This report provides a brief theoretical background and discusses the measurement, interpretation issues, advantages and limitations associated with the use of each SEP indicator. We also describe some problems that arise when selecting SEP indicators and highlight the indicators that appear to be appropriate for health inequality research. Some practical information for use in health inequality research in South Korea is also presented. CONCLUSIONS: Investigation into the associations between various SEP indicators and health outcomes can provide a more complete understanding of mechanisms between SEP and health. The relationship between specific SEP indicators and specific health outcomes can vary by country due to the differences in the historical, socioeconomic, and cultural contexts of the SEP indicators.
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Disparities in Participation in Health Examination by Socio-economic Position among Adult Seoul Residents.
Eun Jeong Chun, Soong Nang Jang, Sung Il Cho, Youngtae Cho, Ok Ryun Moon
J Prev Med Public Health. 2007;40(5):345-350.
DOI: https://doi.org/10.3961/jpmph.2007.40.5.345
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AbstractAbstract PDF
OBJECTIVES
To determine the disparity in the rate people undergo health examinations according to socioeconomic position (SEP) and the changes in this disparity with time. METHODS: Seoul citizens}health profile data from 1997 to 2005 were analyzed. The study subjects were 40 years old and over, and the total number of subjects was 6,601 in 1997, 8,994 in 2001, and 8,819 in 2005. Those aged 60 years and over were eliminated from the analysis of subjects}occupation. We used education, family income and occupation as indicators of SEP. The age-standardized health examination attendance rate for each year was calculated according to the education, family income and occupation. The odds ratios (ORs) from multiple logistic regressions were adjusted for age. RESULTS: The disparity in the rate of attendance according to the SEP decreased from 1997 to 2005 but still existed. Even though the disparities among the subgroups according to education, family income and occupation were not that high, the disparity between the group with the highest SEP and the other groups was considerable. CONCLUSIONS: Our findings suggest that unequal access to health examination services according to socioeconomic position still exists. This disparity has decreased recently but the disparity according to level of education was the greatest.
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Awareness, Treatment, and Control Rates of Hypertension and Related Factors of Awareness among Middle Aged Adult and Elderly in Chuncheon: Hallym Aging Study(HAS).
Jin Young Jeong, Yong Jun Choi, Soong Nang Jang, Kyung soon Hong, Young ho Choi, Moon ki Choi, Dong Hyun Kim
J Prev Med Public Health. 2007;40(4):305-312.
DOI: https://doi.org/10.3961/jpmph.2007.40.4.305
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AbstractAbstract PDF
OBJECTIVES
To estimate the awareness, treatment and control rate, as well as to identify the awareness-related factors for hypertension. METHODS: The study participants were 482 adults (men 206, women 276), aged 45 or over, diagnosed with hypertension and living in Chuncheon. The awareness rate was defined as the proportion of persons among those with hypertension who had previously been diagnosed by a physician. The treatment rate was defined as the proportion of persons who had used anti-hypertensive medication, among those who were aware of their hypertension. The control rate was defined as the proportion of persons who kept blood pressure normal, among those who had been treated for their hypertension. Multivariable logistic regression analysis was carried out for the awarenessrelated factors using SAS VER 8.1. RESULTS: The awareness, treatment, and control rate were 55.8% (53.4% for men; 57.6% for women), 89.6% (87.2% for men; 91.2% for women), and 34.4% (28.1% for men; 38.6% for women), respectively. The awarenessrelated factors included a family history of hypertension (odds ratio[OR], 5.63; 95% confidence interval[95% CI]=1.53-20.72), smoking([Ex; OR 0.38, 95% CI= 0.15- 0.96)], [Current; OR 0.28, 95% CI=0.10-0.80]), and alcohol intake ([Ex; OR 3.22, 95% CI 1.03-10.09],[Current; OR 3.36, 95% CI=1.30-8.71]) for men, and education(OR 2.23, 95% CI=1.10-4.53), body mass index(OR 2.72, 95% CI=1.13-6.53), and self-rated health(OR 2.38, 95% CI=1.07-5.30) for women. CONCLUSIONS: The awareness rate of hypertension among the middle aged and elderly in Chuncheon was 55.8%. The related factors of awareness were gender specific. Further studies are needed to elucidate the putative reasons for these gender differences.
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Prevalence and Associated Factors of Osteoporosis among Postmenopausal Women in Chuncheon: Hallym Aging Study(HAS).
Soong Nang Jang, Young Ho Choi, Moon Gi Choi, Sung Hyun Kang, Jin Young Jeong, Yong Jun Choi, Dong Hyun Kim
J Prev Med Public Health. 2006;39(5):389-396.
  • 3,811 View
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AbstractAbstract PDF
OBJECTIVES
A community-based, cross-sectional survey was conducted to determine theprevalence of osteoporosis and to evaluate the effects of body composition, health behaviors and reproductive history on bone density in postmenopausal women. METHODS: The study subjects were 362 postmenopausal women, aged 45 years old or over, who were invited to the hospital. Information on their socio-demographic characteristics and the potential risk factors such as their past medical history, smoking, alcohol intake, exercise, diet and menstrual/reproductive histories were collected by trained interviewers. Weight, height, the body mass index (kg/m2), and body composition variables were measured. Bone mineral density of the lumbar spine was measured by dual energy X-ray absorptiometry (DXA). RESULTS: The prevalence of osteoporosis was 30.6% in the 45~64 years old women, 52.5% in the elderly women aged 65~74, and 68.7% in the women aged 75 years or over. After adjustment for the effect of potential covariates, those women in the highest 25% (4th quartile) of the lean body mass are less likely to have osteoporosis (aOR=0.31, 95% CI=0.12-0.76), compared with the lowest quartile group. More parity also had significantly detrimental effects on osteoporosis. CONCLUSIONS: These findings suggest that the prevalence of osteoporosis in postmenopausal women increased with age from 46.3% of those aged 45-64 to 68.7% fo those aged 75 and over. Lean body mass and parity appeared significant contributor to bone mineral density in postmenopausal women in this population.
Summary
The Continuum of Rehabilitation Care and the Rehabilitation Services that are Needed by People with Severe Disabilities.
Soong Nang Jang, Seonja Rhee, Wan Ho Kim, Kyu Beom Lee, Sukyung Kim, Jae Young Lim
J Prev Med Public Health. 2006;39(3):263-269.
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AbstractAbstract PDF
OBJECTIVES
As the number of people with disabilities is increasing and their needs for care are varied, the continuum and comprehensiveness of their rehabilitative care are getting more important. This study was performed to understand the utilization of rehabilitation services and requirements of care among the people with severe disabilities in Korea. METHODS: We interviewed 578 disabled persons who had severe extremity and cerebral impairment in the urban and rural areas of Korea. The questionnaire included questions on their general characteristics, the type of disability, their physical function (ADL, IADL), their use of rehabilitation services after discharge and their requirements for rehabilitation care. RESULTS: Only 12.6% of people with disability in the community continuously used the available medical rehabilitation care. The associated factors for utilization of rehabilitation services were pain and admission for rehabilitative treatment in the acute phase. There was a great need for rehabilitation services in community and this varied according to gender, the socio-economic status, the functional status and the geographic region. The gap between utilization and need for rehabilitation services was largest in the economic support. The gap of primary health care was larger in the rural area than in the urban area. CONCLUSIONS: The needs for rehabilitation service were diverse according to the individual functional status, the regional characteristics and other general characteristics of people with disability. Strategies should be considered to eliminate the barriers to obtain rehabilitation services for the people with disability in the community.
Summary
Factors Influencing Antibiotics Prescribing of Primary Health Physicians in Acute Upper Respiratory Infections.
Nam Soon Kim, Soong Nang Jang, Sun Mee Jang
J Prev Med Public Health. 2005;38(1):1-8.
  • 2,215 View
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AbstractAbstract PDF
OBJECTIVES
To explore the factors influencing antibiotics prescription by primary health physicians for acute upper respiratory infections (URI). METHODS: We performed a survey of 370 primary health physicians randomly sampled in April, 2003. The questionnaire consisted of a prescription on the scenario of acute bronchitis case, along with opinions and reasons for prescribing antibiotics on URI. RESULTS: We found that 54.7% of the physicians prescribed antibiotics on the example case of acute bronchitis which is known as not needing antibiotics. Female physicians and ENT physicians had a greater tendency to prescribe antibiotics. The factors influencing antibiotics prescription on URI were the belief about the effectiveness of antibiotics, preference for their own experiences rather than clinical guidelines, perception of patients' expectations, and perception of competitive environment. The prescription of antibiotics in the example case was affected by how much they usually prescribe antibiotics (OR=2.400, 95% CI=1.470-3.917) and the physicians who thought that antibiotics were helpful for their income prescribed antibiotics more than others (OR=6.773, 95% CI=1.816-25.254). CONCLUSION: These findings demonstrated that the false belief on the effectiveness of antibiotics, patient's expectation of medication and fast relief of symptoms, and perception of competitive environment all affected the physicians' prescription of antibiotics on URI. It may help to find barriers to accommodate scientific evidence and clinical guidelines among physicians and to specify subgroups for education about appropriate prescription behaviors.
Summary

JPMPH : Journal of Preventive Medicine and Public Health