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1 "San Kang"
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Original Article
Effects of Income Level on the Association Between Hypertension and Depression: 2010-2017 Korea National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey
San Kang, Hyeon Chang Kim
J Prev Med Public Health. 2020;53(6):439-446.   Published online October 8, 2020
DOI: https://doi.org/10.3961/jpmph.20.337
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AbstractAbstract PDFSupplementary Material
Objectives
This study analyzed the associations of hypertension (HTN) with symptoms and diagnosis of depression by income level among Korean adults.
Methods
This study was based on the 2010-2017 Korea National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey data; a total of 29 425 adults (aged 20 years or older) were analyzed. HTN was defined as a systolic blood pressure ≥140 mmHg, diastolic blood pressure ≥90 mmHg, or use of hypertensive medications. Depression symptoms were evaluated based on a questionnaire about depression-related symptoms. A depression diagnosis was defined based on questionnaire responses indicating that a participant had been diagnosed with depression. Household income was divided into higher or lower income ranges based on the median income of the participants. Multiple logistic regression analyses were performed to assess the associations between HTN and depression symptoms/diagnosis in the higher-income and lower-income groups.
Results
In the higher-income group, the odds ratio (OR) for the association between HTN and depression symptoms was 1.15 (95% confidence interval [CI], 0.97 to 1.37), and the OR for the association between HTN and depression diagnosis was 1.41 (95% CI, 1.13 to 1.76). In the lower-income group, the OR for the association between HTN and depression symptoms was 1.18 (95% CI, 1.04 to 1.34), whereas the OR for the association between HTN and depression diagnosis was 0.82 (95% CI, 0.70 to 0.97).
Conclusions
The associations of HTN with symptoms and diagnosis of depression differed by income level.
Summary

Citations

Citations to this article as recorded by  
  • Impacts of Anxiety and Depression on Clinical Hypertension in Low-Income US Adults
    Rohan M. Shah, Sahil Doshi, Sareena Shah, Shiv Patel, Angela Li, Joseph A. Diamond
    High Blood Pressure & Cardiovascular Prevention.2023; 30(4): 337.     CrossRef
  • Machine learning-based predictive modeling of depression in hypertensive populations
    Chiyoung Lee, Heewon Kim, Gennady S. Cymbalyuk
    PLOS ONE.2022; 17(7): e0272330.     CrossRef
  • The Association between Plasma Concentration of Phytoestrogens and Hypertension within the Korean Multicenter Cancer Cohort
    Juyeon Lee, Ju-Young Kang, Kwang-Pil Ko, Sue-Kyung Park
    Nutrients.2021; 13(12): 4366.     CrossRef

JPMPH : Journal of Preventive Medicine and Public Health