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JPMPH : Journal of Preventive Medicine and Public Health

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Original Article
Disparities in Health Care Utilization Among Urban Homeless in South Korea: A Cross-Sectional Study
Changgyo Yoon, Young-Su Ju, Chang-yup Kim
J Prev Med Public Health. 2011;44(6):267-274.   Published online November 14, 2011
DOI: https://doi.org/10.3961/jpmph.2011.44.6.267
  • 9,547 View
  • 96 Download
  • 10 Crossref
AbstractAbstract PDF
Objectives

We examined health care disparities in Korean urban homeless people and individual characteristics associated with the utilization of health care.

Methods

We selected a sample of 203 homeless individuals at streets, shelters, and drop-in centers in Seoul and Daejeon by a quota sampling method. We surveyed demographic information, information related to using health care, and health status with a questionnaire. Logistic regression analysis was adopted to identify factors associated with using health care and to reveal health care disparities within the Korean urban homeless population.

Results

Among 203 respondents, 89 reported that they had visited health care providers at least once in the past 6 months. Twenty persons (22.5%) in the group that used health care (n = 89) reported feeling discriminated against. After adjustment for age, sex, marital status, educational level, monthly income, perceived health status, Beck Depression Inventory score, homeless period, and other covariates, three factors were significantly associated with medical utilization: female sex (adjusted odds ratio [aOR, 15.95; 95% CI, 3.97 to 64.04], having three or more diseases (aOR, 24.58; 95% CI, 4.23 to 142.78), and non-street residency (aOR, 11.39; 95% CI, 3.58 to 36.24).

Conclusions

Health care disparities in Seoul and Daejeon homeless exist in terms of the main place to stay, physical illnesses, and gender. Under the current homeless support system in South Korea, street homeless have poorer accessibility to health care versus non-street homeless. To provide equitable medical aid for homeless people, strategies to overcome barriers against health care for the street homeless are needed.

Summary

Citations

Citations to this article as recorded by  
  • Unsheltered Homelessness and Health: A Literature Review
    Jessica Richards, Randall Kuhn
    AJPM Focus.2023; 2(1): 100043.     CrossRef
  • Who are the homeless and what kind of problems do they have? A review of the literature
    Jerzy Romaszko, Beata Giergielewicz-Januszko
    Acta Elbingensia.2023; : 1.     CrossRef
  • The association between crime victimization and depressive symptoms among homeless people in Korea: a gender stratified analysis
    Gum-Ryeong Park, Saerom Kim, Namsoon Kim
    Journal of Social Distress and Homelessness.2022; 31(1): 65.     CrossRef
  • Unmet dental care needs of homeless adults in South Korea: Findings from a national survey
    Xianhua Che, Minsung Sohn, Sungje Moon, Hee‐Jung Park
    Health & Social Care in the Community.2022;[Epub]     CrossRef
  • Differences in Utilization of Medical and Dental Services among Homeless People in South Korea
    Seung-Hyun Lee, Jae-In Ryu, Se-Hwan Jung
    International Journal of Environmental Research and Public Health.2020; 17(15): 5304.     CrossRef
  • Correlates of Depressive Symptoms among Middle-Aged and Older Homeless Adults Using the 9-Item Patient Health Questionnaire
    Lin-Yun Wang, Lan-Ping Lin, Yun-Cheng Chen, Tai-Wen Wang, Jin-Ding Lin
    International Journal of Environmental Research and Public Health.2020; 17(13): 4754.     CrossRef
  • Influencing Factors of Transportation Costs regarding Healthcare Service Utilization in Korea
    Su Yeon Jang, Jeong Yeon Seon, In-Hwan Oh
    Journal of Korean Medical Science.2020;[Epub]     CrossRef
  • Coping Styles and Alcohol Dependence among Homeless People
    Cezary Opalach, Jerzy Romaszko, Marcin Jaracz, Robert Kuchta, Alina Borkowska, Adam Buciński, Stephen D Ginsberg
    PLOS ONE.2016; 11(9): e0162381.     CrossRef
  • The Correlation between Gender Inequalities and Their Health Related Factors in World Countries: A Global Cross-Sectional Study
    Jafar Hassanzadeh, Noorollah Moradi, Nader Esmailnasab, Shahab Rezaeian, Pezhman Bagheri, Vajihe Armanmehr
    Epidemiology Research International.2014; 2014: 1.     CrossRef
  • Health Care Utilization Patterns of Homeless Individuals in Boston: Preparing for Medicaid Expansion Under the Affordable Care Act
    Monica Bharel, Wen-Chieh Lin, Jianying Zhang, Elizabeth O’Connell, Robert Taube, Robin E. Clark
    American Journal of Public Health.2013; 103(S2): S311.     CrossRef
Brief Report
Fifteen Years After the Gozan-Dong Glass Fiber Outbreak, Incheon in 1995
Soo-Hun Cho, Joohon Sung, Jonghoon Kim, Young-Su Ju, Minji Han, Kyu-Won Jung
J Prev Med Public Health. 2011;44(4):185-189.   Published online July 29, 2010
DOI: https://doi.org/10.3961/jpmph.2011.44.4.185
  • 6,930 View
  • 55 Download
AbstractAbstract PDF
Objectives

In 1995, an outbreak survey in Gozan-dong concluded that an association between fiberglass exposure in drinking water and cancer outbreak cannot be established. This study follows the subjects from a study in 1995 using a data linkage method to examine whether an association existed. The authors will address the potential benefits and methodological issues following outbreak surveys using data linkage, particularly when informed consent is absent.

Methods

This is a follow-up study of 697 (30 exposed) individuals out of the original 888 (31 exposed) participants (78.5%) from 1995 to 2007 assessing the cancer outcomes and deaths of these individuals. The National Cancer Registry (KNCR) and death certificate data were linked using the ID numbers of the participants. The standardized incidence ratio (SIR) and standardized mortality ratio (SMR) from cancers were calculated by the KNCR.

Results

The SIR values for all cancer or gastrointestinal cancer (GI) occurrences were the lowest in the exposed group (SIR, 0.73; 95% CI, 0.10 to 5.21; 0.00 for GI), while the two control groups (control 1: external, control 2: internal) showed slight increases in their SIR values (SIR, 1.18 and 1.27 for all cancers; 1.62 and 1.46 for GI). All lacked statistical significance. All-cause mortality levels for the three groups showed the same pattern (SMR 0.37, 1.29, and 1.11).

Conclusions

This study did not refute a finding of non-association with a 13-year follow-up. Considering that many outbreak surveys are associated with a small sample size and a cross-sectional design, follow-up studies that utilize data linkage should become standard procedure.

Summary

JPMPH : Journal of Preventive Medicine and Public Health