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Original Articles
Development and Validation of a Novel Generic Health-related Quality of Life Instrument With 20 Items (HINT-20)
Min-Woo Jo, Hyeon-Jeong Lee, Soo Young Kim, Seon-Ha Kim, Hyejung Chang, Jeonghoon Ahn, Minsu Ock
J Prev Med Public Health. 2017;50(1):38-59.   Published online January 10, 2017
DOI: https://doi.org/10.3961/jpmph.16.081
  • 8,846 View
  • 215 Download
  • 6 Crossref
AbstractAbstract PDFSupplementary Material
Objectives
Few attempts have been made to develop a generic health-related quality of life (HRQoL) instrument and to examine its validity and reliability in Korea. We aimed to do this in our present study.
Methods
After a literature review of existing generic HRQoL instruments, a focus group discussion, in-depth interviews, and expert consultations, we selected 30 tentative items for a new HRQoL measure. These items were evaluated by assessing their ceiling effects, difficulty, and redundancy in the first survey. To validate the HRQoL instrument that was developed, known-groups validity and convergent/discriminant validity were evaluated and its test-retest reliability was examined in the second survey.
Results
Of the 30 items originally assessed for the HRQoL instrument, four were excluded due to high ceiling effects and six were removed due to redundancy. We ultimately developed a HRQoL instrument with a reduced number of 20 items, known as the Health-related Quality of Life Instrument with 20 items (HINT-20), incorporating physical, mental, social, and positive health dimensions. The results of the HINT-20 for known-groups validity were poorer in women, the elderly, and those with a low income. For convergent/discriminant validity, the correlation coefficients of items (except vitality) in the physical health dimension with the physical component summary of the Short Form 36 version 2 (SF-36v2) were generally higher than the correlations of those items with the mental component summary of the SF-36v2, and vice versa. Regarding test-retest reliability, the intraclass correlation coefficient of the total HINT-20 score was 0.813 (p<0.001).
Conclusions
A novel generic HRQoL instrument, the HINT-20, was developed for the Korean general population and showed acceptable validity and reliability.
Summary

Citations

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  • A Review of the Types and Characteristics of Healthy Life Expectancy and Methodological Issues
    Young-Eun Kim, Yoon-Sun Jung, Minsu Ock, Seok-Jun Yoon
    Journal of Preventive Medicine and Public Health.2022; 55(1): 1.     CrossRef
  • Health-Related Quality of Life (HRQOL) Instruments and Mobility: A Systematic Review
    Natalia Hernández-Segura, Alba Marcos-Delgado, Arrate Pinto-Carral, Tania Fernández-Villa, Antonio J. Molina
    International Journal of Environmental Research and Public Health.2022; 19(24): 16493.     CrossRef
  • Concepts of Health-Related Quality of Life of Australian Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Children: Parent Perceptions
    Kaley Butten, Peter A. Newcombe, Anne B. Chang, Jeanie K. Sheffield, Kerry-Ann F. O’Grady, Newell W. Johnson, Neil King, Maree Toombs
    Applied Research in Quality of Life.2021; 16(4): 1653.     CrossRef
  • Meaning and Status of Health-related Quality of Life Recognized by Medical Professionals: a Qualitative Study
    Jeehee Pyo, Minsu Ock, Bohyun Park, Nam-eun Kim, Eun Jeong Choi, Hyesook Park, Hyeong Sik Ahn
    Journal of Korean Medical Science.2021;[Epub]     CrossRef
  • Validity and reliability of the Health-Related Quality of Life Instrument with 8 Items (HINT-8) in Korean breast cancer patients
    Juyoung Kim, Min-Woo Jo, Hyeon-Jeong Lee, Sei-Hyun Ahn, Byung Ho Son, Jong Won Lee, Sae Byul Lee
    Osong Public Health and Research Perspectives.2021; 12(4): 254.     CrossRef
  • Developing a comprehensive, culturally sensitive conceptual framework of health domains in Singapore
    Julian Thumboo, Mandy Y. L. Ow, Elenore Judy B. Uy, Xiaohui Xin, Zi Ying Clarice Chan, Sharon C. Sung, Dianne Carrol Bautista, Yin Bun Cheung, Xiang Li
    PLOS ONE.2018; 13(6): e0199881.     CrossRef
Use of Senior Center and the Health-Related Quality of Life in Korean Older Adults
Hyun-Shik Kim, Kazuhiro Harada, Masashi Miyashita, Eun-A Lee, Jin-Kee Park, Yoshio Nakamura
J Prev Med Public Health. 2011;44(4):149-156.   Published online July 29, 2010
DOI: https://doi.org/10.3961/jpmph.2011.44.4.149
  • 10,295 View
  • 86 Download
  • 16 Crossref
AbstractAbstract PDF
Objective

The purpose of the present study was to examine the relationship between the use of senior center and health-related quality of life in Korean older adults.

Methods

A questionnaire survey was conducted to two types of older adults who lived in Busan, Korea: 154 older adults who used a senior center and 137 older adults who did not use a senior center. The Korean version of short-form 36-item health survey was administered to assess the health-related quality of life. Demographic variables were obtained from a questionnaire. These were gender, age, family status, marital status, education, monthly income, present illness, body mass index and physical activity.

Results

The 8-domain scales of physical function and role-physical were significantly higher in the users of the senior center compared with the non-users (F=4.87, p=0.027 and F=7.02, p=0.009, respectively). The 8-domain scales of vitality was also significantly higher in the users of the senior center compared with the non-users (F=7.48, p=0.007).

Conclusions

The present study showed that the users of the senior center have higher physical function, role-physical and vitality compared with the non-users. These findings suggest that although the results are unable to specify causal relationships using the senior center may lead to some improvement in health-related quality of life.

Summary

Citations

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  • Trajectories of Preventive Health Care Utilization Among Older Koreans: The Role of Social Relationships
    Yunkyung Jung, Sunha Choi
    Health Education & Behavior.2023; 50(3): 382.     CrossRef
  • Prolonged social isolation and cognitive function in older adults: lack of informal social contact versus formal social activity as the source of social isolation
    Jinho Kim, Gum-Ryeong Park
    Aging & Mental Health.2023; 27(12): 2438.     CrossRef
  • Functional Status, Quality of Life, and Physical Activity of Senior Club Members—A Cross-Sectional Study
    Ilona Stolarz, Ewelina Magdalena Baszak, Magdalena Zawadka, Piotr Majcher
    International Journal of Environmental Research and Public Health.2022; 19(3): 1900.     CrossRef
  • Associations Between Deaf/Hard of Hearing and Social Participation Among Older Americans
    Ethan Siu Leung Cheung, Zhe Zhang
    The Journal of Deaf Studies and Deaf Education.2022;[Epub]     CrossRef
  • Why Don't Older Adults Use Senior Centers? Evidence from Adults Age 50 and Older in Massachusetts
    Ceara Somerville, Nidya Velasco Roldán, Cindy N. Bui, Caitlin Coyle, Jan Mutchler
    Journal of Elder Policy.2022; 2(1): 103.     CrossRef
  • Associations of the related factors of depression, social support and social participation in kyungro‐dang among older adults in South Korea: A structural equation modelling analysis
    Hocheol Lee, Seokjun Moon, Geurum Song, Eun Woo Nam
    Nursing Open.2021; 8(2): 562.     CrossRef
  • Physical activity benefits of attending a senior center depend largely on age and gender: a study using GPS and accelerometry data
    Oriol Marquet, Monika Maciejewska, Xavier Delclòs-Alió, Guillem Vich, Jasper Schipperijn, Carme Miralles-Guasch
    BMC Geriatrics.2020;[Epub]     CrossRef
  • Long-Term Care System in Korea
    Hyuk Ga
    Annals of Geriatric Medicine and Research.2020; 24(3): 181.     CrossRef
  • Daily lifestyle behaviors and risks of sarcopenia among older adults
    Pei-Lin Tzeng, Chien-Yu Lin, Ting-Fu Lai, Wan-Chi Huang, Evonne Pien, Ming-Chun Hsueh, Kun-Pei Lin, Jong-Hwan Park, Yung Liao
    Archives of Public Health.2020;[Epub]     CrossRef
  • Spiritual Religious Coping is Associated with Quality of Life in Institutionalized Older Adults
    Luciano Magalhães Vitorino, Giancarlo Lucchetti, Ana Eliza Oliveira Santos, Alessandra L. G. Lucchetti, Eric Batista Ferreira, Nilce Piva Adami, Lucila Amaral Carneiro Vianna
    Journal of Religion and Health.2016; 55(2): 549.     CrossRef
  • The Role of Leisure Engagement for Health Benefits Among Korean Older Women
    Junhyoung Kim, Lori Irwin, May Kim, Seungtae Chin, Jun Kim
    Health Care for Women International.2015; 36(12): 1357.     CrossRef
  • Psychosocial Well-Being of the Elderly and Their Perception of Matured Estate in Singapore
    Keng Hua Chong, Wei Quin Yow, Debbie Loo, Ferninda Patrycia
    Journal of Housing For the Elderly.2015; 29(3): 259.     CrossRef
  • Leisure activities and attitude of institutionalized elderly people: a basis for nursing practice
    Vivian Carla de Castro, Lígia Carreira
    Revista Latino-Americana de Enfermagem.2015; 23(2): 307.     CrossRef
  • Short-term Effects of a Systematized Bladder Training Program for Idiopathic Overactive Bladder: A Prospective Study
    Hahn-Ey Lee, Sung Yong Cho, Sangim Lee, Myong Kim, Seung-June Oh
    International Neurourology Journal.2013; 17(1): 11.     CrossRef
  • Quality of life of seniors living in the community and in long term care facilities: a comparative study
    Luciano Magalhães Vitorino, Lisiane Manganelli Girardi Paskulin, Lucila Amaral Carneiro Vianna
    Revista Latino-Americana de Enfermagem.2013; 21(spe): 3.     CrossRef
  • Psychological, Social, and Environmental Factors Associated With Utilization of Senior Centers Among Older Adults in Korea
    Hyun-Shik Kim, Masashi Miyashita, Kazuhiro Harada, Jong-Hwan Park, Jae-Moo So, Yoshio Nakamura
    Journal of Preventive Medicine and Public Health.2012; 45(4): 244.     CrossRef
English Abstract
The Decline of Health-Related Quality of Life Associated with Some Diseases in Korean Adults.
Seol Ryoung Kil, Sang Il Lee, Sung Cheol Yun, Hyung Mi An, Min Woo Jo
J Prev Med Public Health. 2008;41(6):434-441.
DOI: https://doi.org/10.3961/jpmph.2008.41.6.434
  • 5,757 View
  • 101 Download
  • 15 Crossref
AbstractAbstract PDF
OBJECTIVES
This study was conducted to measure the decline in the health-related quality of life (HRQoL) associated with some diseases in South Korean adults. METHODS: The EQ-5D health states in the 2005 National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey (NHNES) and the Korean EQ-5D valuation set were used to obtain the EQ-5D indexes of the study subjects. Each disease group was defined when the subjects reported to the NHNES that they were diagnosed with the corresponding disease during the previous 1 year by physicians. Since the distributions of the EQ-5D indexes in each subgroup were negatively skewed, median regression analysis was used to estimate the effects of specific diseases on the HRQoL. Median regression analysis produced estimates that approximated the median of the EQ-5D indexes and there are more robust for analyzing data with many outliers. RESULTS: A total of 16,692 subjects (6,667 patients and 10,025 people without any disease) were included in the analysis. As a result of the median regression analysis, stroke had the strongest impact on the HRQoL for both males and females, followed by osteoporosis, osteoarthritis, rheumatic arthritis, and herniation of an intervertebral disc. While asthma had a significant impact on the HRQoL only in men, cataract, temporo-mandibular dysfunction, and peptic ulcer significantly affected the HRQoL only in women. CONCLUSIONS: Stroke and musculoskeletal diseases were associated with the largest losses of the HRQoL in Korean adults.
Summary

Citations

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  • Health State Utility Values in People With Stroke: A Systematic Review and Meta‐Analysis
    Raed A. Joundi, Joel Adekanye, Alexander A. Leung, Paul Ronksley, Eric E. Smith, Alexander D. Rebchuk, Thalia S. Field, Michael D. Hill, Stephen B. Wilton, Lauren C. Bresee
    Journal of the American Heart Association.2022;[Epub]     CrossRef
  • Factors Affecting Health-Related Quality of Life in Multimorbidity
    Eunmi Lee, Sunkyung Cha, Geun Myun Kim
    Healthcare.2021; 9(3): 334.     CrossRef
  • Factors Influencing on Health-Related Quality of Life among Men Osteoporosis Patients over 50 Years
    Ji Young Kim, Youngran Yang
    Korean Journal of Adult Nursing.2020; 32(2): 145.     CrossRef
  • Health-Related Quality of Life and Related Factors in Persons with Preserved Ratio Impaired Spirometry: Data from the Korea National Health and Nutrition Examination Surve
    I Re Heo, Ho Cheol Kim, Tae Hoon Kim
    Medicina.2020; 57(1): 4.     CrossRef
  • Cancer site differences in the health‐related quality of life of Korean cancer survivors: Results from a Population‐based Survey
    Mikyung Ryu, Jee‐In Hwang
    Public Health Nursing.2019; 36(2): 144.     CrossRef
  • Factors affecting the health‐related quality of life in community‐dwelling elderly people
    Geun Myun Kim, Myung Sun Hong, Wonjung Noh
    Public Health Nursing.2018; 35(6): 482.     CrossRef
  • Health-related quality of life assessment according to socio-demographic characteristics and health behavior among Gyeonggi-do citizens: focused on gender difference
    Sun-Hee Joung, YeogSeon Hong, AeRee Sohn
    Korean Journal of Health Education and Promotion.2015; 32(3): 33.     CrossRef
  • Prediction Model for Health-Related Quality of Life of Elderly with Chronic Diseases using Machine Learning Techniques
    Soo-Kyoung Lee, Youn-Jung Son, Jeongeun Kim, Hong-Gee Kim, Jae-Il Lee, Bo-Yeong Kang, Hyeon-Sung Cho, Sungin Lee
    Healthcare Informatics Research.2014; 20(2): 125.     CrossRef
  • A Study on Factors in Quality of Life of Patients with Acute Cerebral Infarction One Year after Diagnosis
    Seung-Ok Shin, So Yeon Ryu
    Journal of the Korea Academia-Industrial cooperation Society.2014; 15(1): 274.     CrossRef
  • Effect of Arthritis and Comorbid Chronic Conditions on Health-related Quality of Life in Korean Elderly
    Ji-Young No, Soon-Young Kim, In-Sun Kweon, Hae-Sung Nam
    Journal of the Korea Academia-Industrial cooperation Society.2014; 15(6): 3751.     CrossRef
  • Impact of Post-Stroke Cognitive Impairment with No Dementia on Health-Related Quality of Life
    Jung Hyun Park, Beom Joon Kim, Hee-Joon Bae, Jisung Lee, Juneyoung Lee, Moon-Ku Han, Kyung Yoon O, Seong Ho Park, Yeonwook Kang, Kyung-Ho Yu, Byung-Chul Lee
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  • Difference in Health-related Quality of Life among Social Classes and Related Factors in Korea
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Original Article
The comparison of health-related quality of life between the institutional elderly and the community living elderly.
Kyeong Soo Park, Yong Gil Seo, Hae Sung Nam, Seok Joon Sohn, Jung Ae Rhee
Korean J Prev Med. 1998;31(2):293-309.
  • 1,995 View
  • 22 Download
AbstractAbstract PDF
The purpose of this study is to compare the level of health-related quality of life and relating factor between institutional elderly and community living elderly. The subjects were 390 from Sanatorium or Nursing home and 467 from the community, in Kwangju. The results are followed : l) A comparison of ADL between two groups, institutional elderly and community living elderly, resulted in that community elderly were more significantly independent in the areas of bathing and transfer than institutional elderly. 2) A comparison of IADL between two groups resulted in that ; Community elderly, were more independent in the areas of using telephone and transportation, food preparation, house keeping, and doing laundry. Institutional elderly were more independent in the area of handling finances. 3) In the case of poor health-related quality of life, institutional elderly showed 2.4 times in the dimension of physical fitness, l.8 times in daily activity, 2 times in social activity, 2 times in pain, 26.7 times in social support, and 0.4 times in subjective quality of life higher than community elderly. There was no significant differences in the rest of dimensions. 4) In institutional elderly, the analysis of variables related to the health-related quality, of life resulted in that; The relating factors were sex, education, and chronic illness in the dimension of physical function. Direct contact with family or significant others in the dimension of social activity. Chronic illness in the dimension of pain and perceived health status. Direct or indirect contact with family or significant others over the phone or through letters in the dimension of social support. 5) The analysis of variables relatd to the health-related quality of life showed that community elderly has more relating variables in each area than institutional elderly. The relating factors were age, sex, and chronic illness in the dimension of physical function. Education and chronic illness in the dimension of emotional status. Age and chronic illness in the dimension of daily activity and social activity. Education and chronic illness in the dimension of pain and perceived health status. Sex, education, family size in the dimension of social support. Education and chronic illness in the dimension of subjective quality-of-life. Throughout general daily activity, community elderly showed more satisfactory results than institutional elderly, but in the subjective area of health-related quality of life, such as subjective quality of life, institutional elderly, group showed more positive results. And community elderly had more relating factors than institutional elderly. For the health care of the elderly that focused on quality, of life, new approaches considering the characteristics of both group, institutional and community, living elderly, are needed.
Summary

JPMPH : Journal of Preventive Medicine and Public Health