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4 "Motivation"
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Original Articles
Protection Motivation Theory and Rabies Protective Behaviors Among School Students in Chonburi Province, Thailand
Mayurin Laorujisawat, Aimutcha Wattanaburanon, Pajaree Abdullakasim, Nipa Maharachpong
J Prev Med Public Health. 2021;54(6):431-440.   Published online November 16, 2021
DOI: https://doi.org/10.3961/jpmph.21.457
  • 3,619 View
  • 146 Download
  • 2 Web of Science
  • 2 Crossref
AbstractAbstract PDF
Objectives
The aim of this study was to predict rabies protective behaviors (RPB) based on protection motivation theory (PMT) among fourth-grade students at schools in Chonburi Province, Thailand.
Methods
This cross-sectional study was conducted from December 2020 to February 2021. A multistage sampling technique was used for sample selection. The questionnaire was divided into socio-demographic data and questions related to PMT and RPB. Descriptive statistical analysis was conducted using the EpiData program and inferential statistics, and the results were tested using the partial least squares model with a significance level of less than 5%.
Results
In total, 287 subjects were included, of whom 62.4% were girls and 40.4% reported that YouTube was their favorite media platform. Most participants had good perceived vulnerability, response efficacy, and self efficacy levels related to rabies (43.9, 68.6, and 73.2%, respectively). However, 54.5% had only fair perceived severity levels related to rabies. Significant positive correlations were found between RPB and the PMT constructs related to rabies (β, 0.298; p<0.001), and the school variable (S4) was also a predictor of RPB (β, -0.228; p<0.001). Among the PMT constructs, self efficacy was the strongest predictor of RPB (β, 0.741; p<0.001).
Conclusions
PMT is a useful framework for predicting RPB. Future RPB or prevention/protection intervention studies based on PMT should focus on improving self efficacy and response efficacy, with a particular focus on teaching students not to intervene with fighting animals. The most influential PMT constructs can be used for designing tools and implementing and evaluating future educational interventions to prevent rabies in children.
Summary

Citations

Citations to this article as recorded by  
  • Screening Intention Prediction of Colorectal Cancer among Urban Chinese Based on the Protection Motivation Theory
    Wenshuang Wei, Miao Zhang, Dan Zuo, Qinmei Li, Min Zhang, Xinguang Chen, Bin Yu, Qing Liu
    International Journal of Environmental Research and Public Health.2022; 19(7): 4203.     CrossRef
  • Career resilience of the tourism and hospitality workforce in the COVID-19: The protection motivation theory perspective
    Diep Ngoc Su, Thi Minh Truong, Tuan Trong Luu, Hanh My Thi Huynh, Barry O'Mahony
    Tourism Management Perspectives.2022; 44: 101039.     CrossRef
Factors Affecting Breast Self-examination Behavior Among Female Healthcare Workers in Iran: The Role of Social Support Theory
saeed bashirian, Majid Barati, Leila Moaddab Shoar, Younes Mohammadi, Mitra Dogonchi
J Prev Med Public Health. 2019;52(4):224-233.   Published online June 26, 2019
DOI: https://doi.org/10.3961/jpmph.18.277
  • 7,869 View
  • 337 Download
  • 10 Crossref
AbstractAbstract PDFSupplementary Material
Objectives
In women, breast cancer is the most common cancer and the leading cause of cancer death. Screening tests are the basis for early diagnosis. In Iranian women, the mortality rate of breast cancer is high due to insufficient screening examinations and delayed visits for care. Therefore, this study aimed to determine the factors affecting breast self-examinations among Iranian women employed in medical careers.
Methods
This cross-sectional study included 501 women working in the medical professions at Hamadan University of Medical Sciences in western Iran in 2018. The subjects were selected by stratified random sampling. Data were collected using a researcher-developed, self-report questionnaire that contained demographic information and questions based on protection motivation theory and social support theory. Descriptive data analysis was conducted using SPSS version 23 and model fitting with PLS version 2.
Results
The mean age of the participants was 37.1±8.3 years, and most of the women (80.4%) were married. Most women had a bachelor’s degree (67.5%). The findings of this study showed that the coping appraisal construct was a predictor of protection motivation (β=0.380, p<0.05), and protection motivation (β=0.604, p<0.05) was a predictor of breast self-examination behavior. Additionally, social support theory (β=0.202, p<0.05) had a significant positive effect on breast self-examination behavior.
Conclusions
The frequency of practicing self-examinations among women employees in the medical sector was low; considering the influence of social support as a factor promoting screening, it is necessary to pay attention to influential people in women’s lives when designing educational interventions.
Summary

Citations

Citations to this article as recorded by  
  • Factors Affecting Breast Screening Behavior of First-Degree Relatives of Breast Cancer Patients in China
    Ningning Lu, Chi Zhang, Hua You, Zhuyue Ma, Ping Zhu, Fang Cheng
    Cancer Nursing.2024;[Epub]     CrossRef
  • A concept analysis: Support for lay healthcare workers in HIV services, Bojanala District, North West
    Sarah B. Pitse, Patrone R. Risenga
    Curationis.2023;[Epub]     CrossRef
  • The Sociocultural Influences on Breast Cancer Screening among Rural African Women in South Africa
    Nelisha Sarmah, Maureen Nokuthula Sibiya, Thandokuhle Emmanuel Khoza
    International Journal of Environmental Research and Public Health.2023; 20(21): 7005.     CrossRef
  • The practice of breast self-examination and associated factors among female healthcare professionals working in selected hospitals in Kigali, Rwanda: a cross sectional study
    Mulugeta Tenna Wolde, Rosemary Okova, Michael Habtu, Mekitie Wondafrash, Abebe Bekele
    BMC Women's Health.2023;[Epub]     CrossRef
  • Predicting preventive travel behaviors under the COVID-19 pandemic through an integration of Health Belief Model and Value-Belief-Norm
    Namhyun Kim, SoJung Lee, Choong-Ki Lee, Courtney Suess
    Tourism Management Perspectives.2022; 43: 100981.     CrossRef
  • Structural equation modeling to detect predictors of breast self‐examination behavior: Implications for intervention planning
    Nianting Ju, Shengkai Liao, Suge Zheng, Tiantian Hua, Shunhua Zhang
    Journal of Obstetrics and Gynaecology Research.2021; 47(2): 583.     CrossRef
  • Knowledge and Practice on Breast Self-Examination and Associated Factors among Summer Class Social Science Undergraduate Female Students in the University of Gondar, Northwest Ethiopia
    Muhabaw Shumye Mihret, Temesgen Worku Gudayu, Abera Shiferaw Abebe, Emebet Gebru Tarekegn, Solomon Ketemaw Abebe, Mosina Aminu Abduselam, Tejitu Dereje Shiferaw, Genet Worku Kebede, Samuel Antwi
    Journal of Cancer Epidemiology.2021; 2021: 1.     CrossRef
  • Knowledge and Practice of Breast Cancer Screening Methods among Female Community Pharmacists in Jordan: A Cross-Sectional Study
    Nehad M. Ayoub, Ghaith M. Al-Taani, Basima A. Almomani, Linda Tahaineh, Khawla Nuseir, Areej Othman, Kofi Boamah Mensah, Pranshu Sahgal
    International Journal of Breast Cancer.2021; 2021: 1.     CrossRef
  • Determinants of Intention to Participate in Breast Cancer Screening among Urban Chinese Women: An Application of the Protection Motivation Theory
    Miao Zhang, Wenshuang Wei, Qinmei Li, Xinguang Chen, Min Zhang, Dan Zuo, Qing Liu
    International Journal of Environmental Research and Public Health.2021; 18(21): 11093.     CrossRef
  • Impact of Social Support and Social Trust on Public Viral Risk Response: A COVID-19 Survey Study
    Eugene Song, Hyun Jung Yoo
    International Journal of Environmental Research and Public Health.2020; 17(18): 6589.     CrossRef
Special Article
Commitment to Sport and Exercise: Re-examining the Literature for a Practical and Parsimonious Model
Lavon Williams
J Prev Med Public Health. 2013;46(Suppl 1):S35-S42.   Published online January 30, 2013
DOI: https://doi.org/10.3961/jpmph.2013.46.S.S35
  • 9,085 View
  • 88 Download
  • 18 Crossref
AbstractAbstract PDF

A commitment to physical activity is necessary for personal health, and is a primary goal of physical activity practitioners. Effective practitioners rely on theory and research as a guide to best practices. Thus, sound theory, which is both practical and parsimonious, is a key to effective practice. The purpose of this paper is to review the literature in search of such a theory - one that applies to and explains commitment to physical activity in the form of sport and exercise for youths and adults. The Sport Commitment Model has been commonly used to study commitment to sport and has more recently been applied to the exercise context. In this paper, research using the Sport Commitment Model is reviewed relative to its utility in both the sport and exercise contexts. Through this process, the relevance of the Investment Model for study of physical activity commitment emerged, and a more parsimonious framework for studying of commitment to physical activity is suggested. Lastly, links between the models of commitment and individuals' participation motives in physical activity are suggested and practical implications forwarded.

Summary

Citations

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  • “Having our say”: a micro-level perspective in understanding sports clubs’ membership and active participation
    Foula Z. Kopanidis
    Journal of Social Marketing.2023; 13(4): 473.     CrossRef
  • The Value-Added Contribution of Exercise Commitment to College Students’ Exercise Behavior: Application of Extended Model of Theory of Planned Behavior
    Wen-Juan Zhang, Menglin Xu, Yu-Juan Feng, Zhi-Xiong Mao, Zeng-Yin Yan, Teng-Fei Fan
    Frontiers in Psychology.2022;[Epub]     CrossRef
  • Effect of Teaching Methods on Motor Efficiency, Perceptions and Awareness in Children
    Gaetano Raiola, Tiziana D’Isanto, Felice Di Domenico, Francesca D’Elia
    International Journal of Environmental Research and Public Health.2022; 19(16): 10287.     CrossRef
  • A Socially Assistive Mobile Platform for Weight-Support in Gait Training
    Bruno Leme, Masakazu Hirokawa, Hideki Kadone, Kenji Suzuki
    International Journal of Social Robotics.2021; 13(3): 459.     CrossRef
  • Physical Sports Activities and Exercise Addiction during Lockdown in the Spanish Population
    Rosendo Berengüí, José María López-Gullón, Salvador Angosto
    International Journal of Environmental Research and Public Health.2021; 18(6): 3119.     CrossRef
  • Effects of Commitment on Fear of Failure and Burnout in Teen Spanish Handball Players
    Juan González-Hernández, Carlos Marques da Silva, Diogo Monteiro, Marianna Alesi, Manuel Gómez-López
    Frontiers in Psychology.2021;[Epub]     CrossRef
  • Youth Female Ice Hockey Players’ Enjoyment and Commitment to Sport
    Kari Roethlisberger, Vista Beasley, Jeffrey Martin, Brigid Byrd, Krista Munroe-Chandler, Irene Muir
    Women in Sport and Physical Activity Journal.2020; 28(1): 3.     CrossRef
  • Examining the Relationships Among Cognitive Acceptance, Behavioral Commitment, Autonomous Extrinsic Motivation, and Physical Activity
    Matthew Jenkins, Elaine A. Hargreaves, Ken Hodge
    Journal of Sport and Exercise Psychology.2020; 42(3): 177.     CrossRef
  • Longitudinal Trends in Sport Participation and Retention of Women and Girls
    Rochelle Eime, Jack Harvey, Melanie Charity, Hans Westerbeek
    Frontiers in Sports and Active Living.2020;[Epub]     CrossRef
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    Karla Palmer, Lorraine B. Robbins, Jiying Ling, Tsui-Sui Annie Kao, Vicki R. Voskuil, Alan L. Smith
    Journal of Pediatric Nursing.2020; 54: e36.     CrossRef
  • Motives and Commitment to Sport in Amateurs during Confinement: A Segmentation Study
    Salvador Angosto, Rosendo Berengüí, José Miguel Vegara-Ferri, José María López-Gullón
    International Journal of Environmental Research and Public Health.2020; 17(20): 7398.     CrossRef
  • Psychological Connection to Pickleball: Assessing Motives and Participation in Older Adults
    Jonathan M. Casper, Jung-Hwan Jeon
    Journal of Aging and Physical Activity.2019; 27(1): 28.     CrossRef
  • An exploration of commitment in nature-based recreation, and its relationship with participation and purchase behaviour
    Brent Lovelock, Carla Jellum, Anna Carr, Tim Jowett
    Annals of Leisure Research.2019; 22(3): 373.     CrossRef
  • Psychological demands experienced by recreational endurance athletes
    Alister McCormick, Carla Meijen, Samuele Marcora
    International Journal of Sport and Exercise Psychology.2018; 16(4): 415.     CrossRef
  • Aspects influencing the commitment of endurance athletes: a tourism perspective
    Esmarie Myburgh, Martinette Kruger, Melville Saayman
    Journal of Sport & Tourism.2018; 22(4): 275.     CrossRef
  • Demographic characteristics and type/frequency of physical activity participation in a large sample of 21,603 Australian people
    Rochelle M. Eime, Jack T. Harvey, Melanie J. Charity, Rayoni Nelson
    BMC Public Health.2018;[Epub]     CrossRef
  • Análise do comportamento competitivo de atletas jovens e adultos de handebol
    Lidyane Ferreira ZAMBRIN, Ana Carolina PALUDO, Oriane de Souza Pinto Martins dos SANTOS, Sérgio Ricardo de Souza OLIVEIRA, Antonio Carlos SIMÕES, Hélio SERASSUELO JUNIOR
    Revista Brasileira de Educação Física e Esporte.2016; 30(2): 505.     CrossRef
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    Jin-Jong Chen, Yunhwan Lee
    Journal of Preventive Medicine & Public Health.2013; 46(Suppl 1): S1.     CrossRef
Original Article
Factors Affecting Selection of Delivery Facilities by Pregnant Women.
Choong Wan Lee, Seung Hum Yu, Hee Choul Oh
Korean J Prev Med. 1990;23(4):436-450.
  • 1,857 View
  • 21 Download
AbstractAbstract PDF
This study was designed to investigate the major factors affecting selection of delivery facilities by pregnant women. Five hundred women hospitalized at 23 Seoul-area delivery facilities, such as university hospitals, general hospitals, hospitals, and clinics were selected and given questionnaires from April 24 to May 7, 1990. A total of 350 questionnaires were collected and analysed for the study. The results are as follows; 1. In general, variables which significantly affected the choice of delivery facilities included the age of women, their educational level, the educational level of their husbands, monthly average incomes and residential areas. 2. In analyzing the obstetrical characteristics of the women, those variables significantly affecting the choice of delivery facilities were the gestational period, the facilities for prenatal care, the frequency of prenatal care, the type of delivery, the frequency of miscarriage, previous delivery experiences and the awareness on prenatal care. 3. In comparing the motivation factors for selecting the delivery facilities, all the factors except convenience and need for hospitalization differed significantly among delivery facilities. 4. The factor analysis was assessed for twenty possible factors motivating the choice of delivery facilities. Six factors including personal service, scale of the facility, reputation, urgency, convenience, and experience were noted explaining by 57.7%. 5. In the discriminant analysis used to clarify the major factors affecting the selection of delivery facilities, the 16 significant variables were regarded as independent variables, and the type of delivery facilities was considered a dependent variable. The stepwise method was applied to the analysis. Detected discriminant variables were the facilities for prenatal care, scale factor, personal service factor, urgency factor, convenience factor, reputation factor, experience factor, gestational period, types of delivery, frequency of miscarriage, age and income. These 12 discriminant variables were tested, with reference to discriminant prediction, on their importance in the choice of the delivery facility, by the discriminant functional formula. The test showed a hit-rate of 67.7%. The results suggest that general characteristics, obstetrical characteristics, and motivations for selecting the delivery facilities differ significantly according to the types of the delivery facilities. This study implies that all types of delivery facilities should attempt to acommodate characteristics and motivations of pregnant women. The facilities should be prepared to increase their patients satisfaction with required medical conditions by improving service and responding to the pregnant women's preferences.
Summary

JPMPH : Journal of Preventive Medicine and Public Health