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COVID-19: Original Article
Sources of Infection Among Confirmed Cases of COVID-19 in Jeju Province, Korea
Moonkyong Hwang, Jong-Myon Bae
J Prev Med Public Health. 2021;54(4):245-250.   Published online June 30, 2021
DOI: https://doi.org/10.3961/jpmph.21.286
  • 3,060 View
  • 115 Download
  • 2 Crossref
AbstractAbstract AbstractSummary PDFSupplementary Material
Objectives
Jeju Province in Korea reported 627 coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) cases between January 20, 2020, and March 31, 2021. This study analyzed the sources of infection among confirmed cases in Jeju Province, a self-governed island.
Methods
The sources of infection were broadly categorized as follows: (1) infections from overseas (confirmed patients who reported travel overseas or contact with overseas travelers); (2) infections from outside Jeju Province (confirmed patients who had visited other provinces or had contact with individuals who had traveled to other provinces in Korea); and (3) unknown sources of infection (confirmed patients who were infected following contact with an infected person whose source of infection was unknown). The chi-square test was used to analyze the differences in the distributions of related variables for each source of infection.
Results
Of the 627 confirmed cases, 38 (6.1%) were infections from overseas sources, 199 (31.7%) were from outside of Jeju Province, and 390 (62.2%) were from unknown sources. Jeju Province had no cases with an unknown source of infection during the first and second waves of the nationwide outbreak.
Conclusions
Infections from overseas sources could be blocked from spreading to local communities in Jeju Province by conducting screening at the airport, along with the preemptive suspension of visa-free entry. In addition, considering the scale of the nationwide outbreak, measures must be established to delay outbreaks from unknown sources of infection caused by sources outside Jeju Province.
Summary
Korean summary
제주도 COVID-19 확진지의 감염원은 다음의 3가지로 대분할 수 있었다. (1) 해외유입 감염원: 해외 방문력이 있거나 해외 방문력이 있는 확진자와 접촉한 적이 있는 확진자; (2) 도외유입 감염원: 국내 타시도 방문력이 있거나 타시도 확진자와 접촉한 적이 있는 확진자; (3) 감염원 미상: 감염경로를 특정할 수 없는 도내 확진자와 이들과 접촉하여 확진자가 된 경우. 이중 해외유입군에 대하여는 선제적인 무비자 중지 결정과 함께 공항만에서의 선별검사를 시행하여 해외유입에 의한 지역사회 전파 가능성을 막을 수 있음을 확인하였다. 반면, 전국의 유행 크기와 맞물러, 도외 유입군으로 인한 감염미상군 발생 시점을 최대한 미룰 수 있는 방안들을 개발할 필요가 있겠다.

Citations

Citations to this article as recorded by  
  • The Impact of the South Korean Local Government's Public Health and Healthy Urban Planning Policies in Combating COVID-19
    Fatih ULAŞAN
    Kent Akademisi.2023;[Epub]     CrossRef
  • Clinical Characteristics and Risk Factors for Severe Disease of Coronavirus Disease 2019 in a Low Case Fatality Rate Region in Korea
    Misun Kim, Jeong Rae Yoo, Sang Taek Heo, Hyang Ran Lee, Hyunjoo Oh
    Infection & Chemotherapy.2021; 53(4): 718.     CrossRef
COVID-19: Systematic Review
Estimate of the Basic Reproduction Number for COVID-19: A Systematic Review and Meta-analysis
Yousef Alimohamadi, Maryam Taghdir, Mojtaba Sepandi
J Prev Med Public Health. 2020;53(3):151-157.   Published online March 20, 2020
DOI: https://doi.org/10.3961/jpmph.20.076
  • 22,577 View
  • 1,226 Download
  • 176 Crossref
AbstractAbstract PDF
Objectives
The outbreak of coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) is one of the main public health challenges currently facing the world. Because of its high transmissibility, COVID-19 has already caused extensive morbidity and mortality in many countries throughout the world. An accurate estimation of the basic reproduction number (R0) of COVID-19 would be beneficial for prevention programs. In light of discrepancies in original research on this issue, this systematic review and meta-analysis aimed to estimate the pooled R0 for COVID-19 in the current outbreak.
Methods
International databases (including Google Scholar, Science Direct, PubMed, and Scopus) were searched to identify studies conducted regarding the R0 of COVID-19. Articles were searched using the following keywords: “COVID-19” and “basic reproduction number” or “R0.” The heterogeneity among studies was assessed using the I2 index, the Cochran Q test, and T2. A random-effects model was used to estimate R0 in this study.
Results
The mean reported R0 in the identified articles was 3.38±1.40, with a range of 1.90 to 6.49. According to the results of the random-effects model, the pooled R0 for COVID-19 was estimated as 3.32 (95% confidence interval, 2.81 to 3.82). According to the results of the meta-regression analysis, the type of model used to estimate R0 did not have a significant effect on heterogeneity among studies (p=0.81).
Conclusions
Considering the estimated R0 for COVID-19, reducing the number of contacts within the population is a necessary step to control the epidemic. The estimated overall R0 was higher than the World Health Organization estimate.
Summary

Citations

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Brief Report
Community-acquired Legionnaires’ Disease in a Newly Constructed Apartment Building
Sukhyun Ryu, Kyungho Yang, Byung Chul Chun
J Prev Med Public Health. 2017;50(4):274-277.   Published online June 28, 2017
DOI: https://doi.org/10.3961/jpmph.17.066
  • 5,479 View
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AbstractAbstract PDF
Objectives
Legionnaires’ disease (LD) is a severe type of pneumonia caused by inhalation of aerosols contaminated with Legionella. On September 22, 2016, a single case of LD was reported from a newly built apartment building in Gyeonggi province. This article describes an epidemiologic investigation of LD and identification of the possible source of infection. Methods: To identify the source of LD, we interviewed the patient’s husband using a questionnaire based on the Legionella management guidelines from the Korea Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. Water samples from the site were collected and analyzed. An epidemiological investigation of the residents and visitors in the apartment building was conducted for 14 days before the index patient’s symptoms first appeared to 14 days after the implementation of environmental control measures. Results: Legionella pneumophila serogroup 1 was isolated from the heated-water samples from the patient’s residence and the basement of the apartment complex. Thirty-two suspected cases were reported from the apartment building during the surveillance period, yet all were confirmed negative based on urinary antigen tests. Conclusions: The likely source of infection was the building’s potable water, particularly heated water. Further study of effective monitoring systems in heated potable water should be considered.
Summary

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Special Article
Structural Factors of the Middle East Respiratory Syndrome Coronavirus Outbreak as a Public Health Crisis in Korea and Future Response Strategies
Dong-Hyun Kim
J Prev Med Public Health. 2015;48(6):265-270.   Published online November 30, 2015
DOI: https://doi.org/10.3961/jpmph.15.066
  • 37,582 View
  • 209 Download
  • 20 Crossref
AbstractAbstract PDF
The recent Middle East respiratory syndrome coronavirus (MERS-CoV) outbreak has originated from a failure in the national quarantine system in the Republic of Korea as most basic role of protecting the safety and lives of its citizens. Furthermore, a number of the Korean healthcare system’s weaknesses seem to have been completely exposed. The MERS-CoV outbreak can be considered a typical public health crisis in that the public was not only greatly terrorized by the actual fear of the disease, but also experienced a great impact to their daily lives, all in a short period of time. Preparedness for and an appropriate response to a public health crisis require comprehensive systematic public healthcare measures to address risks comprehensively with an all-hazards approach. Consequently, discussion regarding establishment of post-MERS-CoV improvement measures must focus on the total reform of the national quarantine system and strengthening of the public health infrastructure. In addition, the Korea Centers for Disease Control and Prevention must implement specific strategies of action including taking on the role of “control tower” in a public health emergency, training of Field Epidemic Intelligence Service officers, establishment of collaborative governance between central and local governments for infection prevention and control, strengthening the roles and capabilities of community-based public hospitals, and development of nationwide crisis communication methods.
Summary

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Perspective
Costly Lessons From the 2015 Middle East Respiratory Syndrome Coronavirus Outbreak in Korea
Sang-il Lee
J Prev Med Public Health. 2015;48(6):274-276.   Published online November 25, 2015
DOI: https://doi.org/10.3961/jpmph.15.064
  • 15,421 View
  • 170 Download
  • 21 Crossref
AbstractAbstract PDF
Since the Middle East respiratory syndrome (MERS) outbreak in the Republic of Korea (hereafter Korea) began on May 11, 2015, a total of 186 persons have been infected by the MERS coronavirus, 38 of whom have died. With this number, Korea becomes second only to the Kingdom of Saudi Arabia in the ranking of cumulative MERS cases. In this paper Korea’s unique experience of an outbreak of MERS will be summarized and discussed briefly.
Summary

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Original Articles
Respiratory Syncytial Virus Outbreak in the Basic Military Training Camp of the Republic of Korea Air Force
Won-Ju Park, Seok-Ju Yoo, Suk-Ho Lee, Jae-Woo Chung, Keun-Ho Jang, Jai-Dong Moon
J Prev Med Public Health. 2015;48(1):10-17.   Published online January 14, 2015
DOI: https://doi.org/10.3961/jpmph.14.037
  • 9,542 View
  • 97 Download
  • 2 Crossref
AbstractAbstract PDF
Objectives
An outbreak of acute febrile illness occurred in the Republic of Korea Air Force boot camp from May to July 2011. An epidemiological investigation of the causative agent, which was of a highly infective nature, was conducted.
Methods
Throat swabs were carried out and a multiplex reverse transcriptase-polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR) assay was performed to identify possible causative factors.
Results
The mean age of patients who had febrile illness during the study period was 20.24 years. The multiplex RT-PCR assay identified respiratory syncytial virus (RSV) as the causative agent. The main symptoms were sore throat (76.0%), sputum (72.8%), cough (72.1%), tonsillar hypertrophy (67.9%), and rhinorrhea (55.9%). The mean temperature was 38.75°C and the attack rate among the recruits was 15.7% (588 out of 3750 recruits), while the mean duration of fever was 2.3 days. The prognosis was generally favorable with supportive care but recurrent fever occurred in 10.1% of the patients within a month.
Conclusions
This is the first epidemiological study of an RSV outbreak that developed in a healthy young adult group. In the event of an outbreak of an acute febrile illness of a highly infective nature in facilities used by a young adult group, RSV should be considered among the possible causative agents.
Summary

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  • Respiratory syncytial virus infection and the need for immunization in Korea
    Hye Young Kim, Ki Wook Yun, Hee Jin Cheong, Eun Hwa Choi, Hoan Jong Lee
    Expert Review of Vaccines.2023;[Epub]     CrossRef
  • COVID-19 outbreak in a military unit in Korea
    Chanhee Kim, Young-Man Kim, Namwoo Heo, Eunjung Park, Sojin Choi, Sehyuk Jang, Nayoung Kim, Donghyok Kwon, Young-Joon Park, Byeongseop Choi, Beomman Ha, Kyounghwa Jung, Changbo Park, Sejin Park, Heeyoung Lee
    Epidemiology and Health.2021; 43: e2021065.     CrossRef
Epidemiological Investigation of an Outbreak of Hepatitis A at a Residential Facility for the Disabled, 2011
Hyun-Sul Lim, Kumbal Choi, Saerom Lee
J Prev Med Public Health. 2013;46(2):62-73.   Published online March 28, 2013
DOI: https://doi.org/10.3961/jpmph.2013.46.2.62
  • 9,804 View
  • 81 Download
  • 4 Crossref
AbstractAbstract PDF
Objectives

An outbreak of hepatitis A occurred at a residential facility for the disabled in July 10, 2011. This investigation was carried out to develop a response plan, and to find the infection source of the disease.

Methods

A field epidemiologist investigated the symptoms, vaccination histories, living environments, and probable infection sources with 51 residents and 31 teachers and staff members. In July 25, 81 subjects were tested for the hepatitis A virus antibody, and specimens of the initial 3 cases and the last case were genetically tested.

Results

Three cases occurred July 10 to 14, twelve cases August 3 to 9, and the last case on August 29. Among the teachers and staff, no one was IgM positive (on July 25). The base sequences of the initial 3 and of the last case were identical. The vehicle of the outbreak was believed to be a single person. The initial 3 patients were exposed at the same time and they might have disseminated the infection among the patients who developed symptoms in early August, and the last patient might have, in turn, been infected by the early August cases.

Conclusions

The initial source of infection is not clear, but volunteers could freely come into contact with residents, and an infected volunteer might have been the common infection source of the initial patients. Volunteers' washing their hands only after their activity might be the cause of this outbreak. Although there may be other possible causes, it would be reasonable to ask volunteers to wash their hands both before and after their activities.

Summary

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Special Article
The Singapore Field Epidemiology Service: Insights Into Outbreak Management
Peng-Lim Ooi, Theresa Seetoh, Jeffery Cutter
J Prev Med Public Health. 2012;45(5):277-282.   Published online September 28, 2012
DOI: https://doi.org/10.3961/jpmph.2012.45.5.277
  • 14,084 View
  • 100 Download
  • 2 Crossref
AbstractAbstract PDF

Field epidemiology involves the implementation of quick and targeted public health interventions with the aid of epidemiological methods. In this article, we share our practical experiences in outbreak management and in safeguarding the population against novel diseases. Given that cities represent the financial nexuses of the global economy, global health security necessitates the safeguard of cities against epidemic diseases. Singapore's public health landscape has undergone a systemic and irreversible shift with global connectivity, rapid urbanization, ecological change, increased affluence, as well as shifting demographic patterns over the past two decades. Concomitantly, the threat of epidemics, ranging from severe acute respiratory syndrome and influenza A (H1N1) to the resurgence of vector-borne diseases as well as the rise of modern lifestyle-related outbreaks, have worsened difficulties in safeguarding public health amidst much elusiveness and unpredictability. One critical factor that has helped the country overcome these innate and man-made public health vulnerabilities is the development of a resilient field epidemiology service, which includes our enhancement of surveillance and response capacities for outbreak management, and investment in public health leadership. We offer herein the Singapore story as a case study in meeting the challenges of disease control in our modern built environment.

Summary

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Brief Report
Fifteen Years After the Gozan-Dong Glass Fiber Outbreak, Incheon in 1995
Soo-Hun Cho, Joohon Sung, Jonghoon Kim, Young-Su Ju, Minji Han, Kyu-Won Jung
J Prev Med Public Health. 2011;44(4):185-189.   Published online July 29, 2010
DOI: https://doi.org/10.3961/jpmph.2011.44.4.185
  • 6,773 View
  • 55 Download
AbstractAbstract PDF
Objectives

In 1995, an outbreak survey in Gozan-dong concluded that an association between fiberglass exposure in drinking water and cancer outbreak cannot be established. This study follows the subjects from a study in 1995 using a data linkage method to examine whether an association existed. The authors will address the potential benefits and methodological issues following outbreak surveys using data linkage, particularly when informed consent is absent.

Methods

This is a follow-up study of 697 (30 exposed) individuals out of the original 888 (31 exposed) participants (78.5%) from 1995 to 2007 assessing the cancer outcomes and deaths of these individuals. The National Cancer Registry (KNCR) and death certificate data were linked using the ID numbers of the participants. The standardized incidence ratio (SIR) and standardized mortality ratio (SMR) from cancers were calculated by the KNCR.

Results

The SIR values for all cancer or gastrointestinal cancer (GI) occurrences were the lowest in the exposed group (SIR, 0.73; 95% CI, 0.10 to 5.21; 0.00 for GI), while the two control groups (control 1: external, control 2: internal) showed slight increases in their SIR values (SIR, 1.18 and 1.27 for all cancers; 1.62 and 1.46 for GI). All lacked statistical significance. All-cause mortality levels for the three groups showed the same pattern (SMR 0.37, 1.29, and 1.11).

Conclusions

This study did not refute a finding of non-association with a 13-year follow-up. Considering that many outbreak surveys are associated with a small sample size and a cross-sectional design, follow-up studies that utilize data linkage should become standard procedure.

Summary
Original Article
Epidemiologic Investigation into the Outbreak of Acute Hemorrhagic Conjunctivitis in Gyeongju-City, South Korea, in 2002.
Hong Hwan Kim, Hyun Sul Lim, Young Sun Min
J Prev Med Public Health. 2004;37(4):312-320.   Published online November 30, 2004
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OBJECTIVES
An outbreak of acute hemorrhagic conjunctivitis (AHC) caused by coxsackie A24 (CA24) virus occurred in South Korea in 2002. CA24 was isolated for the first time from patients with AHC. Therefore, this study was conducted to understand the transmission routes and prevent another AHC outbreaks. METHODS: The authors conducted a questionnaire survey among 1, 730 students from 2 middle schools and 1 technical high school in Gyeongju city. For statistical analysis the chi-square test was used, and chi-square for trend method showing a level of significance less than p< 0.05 was proven to be significant. Variables which were proven to be significant in univariate analysis were analysed by multiple logistic regression. RESULTS: The attack rate was 57.1%. The student groups with rubbing one's own eyes, computer usage, and sharing cellular phone had a significantly higher AHC attack rate (p< 0.05). According to the multiple logistic regression, the odds ratios for male, high school, computer use, sharing cellular phone, and rubbing one's own eyes were significant (p< 0.05). CONCLUSION: The most significant feature of this outbreak was that many students rubbed their own eyes following contact with AHC patients in a deliberate attempt to avoid going to school. Other transmission methods were computer usage and sharing cellular phone. In the future, health and school authorities must plan new strategies for the prevention of AHC.
Summary
English Abstract
Epidemiological Investigation for Outbreak of Food Poisoning Caused by Bacillus cereus Among the Workers at a Local Company in 2010.
Kum Bal Choi, Hyun Sul Lim, Kwan Lee, Gyoung Yim Ha, Kwang Hyun Jung, Chang Kyu Sohn
J Prev Med Public Health. 2011;44(2):65-73.
DOI: https://doi.org/10.3961/jpmph.2011.44.2.65
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  • 6 Crossref
AbstractAbstract PDF
OBJECTIVES
In July 2 2010, a diarrhea outbreak occurred among the workers in a company in Gyeungju city, Korea. An epidemiological investigation was performed to clarify the cause and transmission route of the outbreak. METHODS: We conducted a questionnaire survey among 193 persons, and we examined 21 rectal swabs and 6 environmental specimens. We also delegated the Daegu Bukgu public health center to examine 3 food service employees and 5 environmental specimens from the P buffet which served a buffet on June 30. The patient case was defined as a worker of L Corporation and who participated in the company meal service and who had diarrhea more than one time. We also collected the underground water filter of the company on July 23. RESULTS: The attack rate of diarrhea among the employees was 20.3%. The epidemic curve showed that a single exposure peaked on July 1. The relative risk of attendance and non-attendance by date was highest for the lunch of June 30 (35.62; 95% CI, 2.25 to 574.79). There was no specific food that was statistically regarded as the source of the outbreak. Bacillus cereus was cultured from two of the rectal swabs, two of the preserved foods and the underground water filter. We thought the exposure date was lunch of June 30 according the latency period of B. cereus. CONCLUSIONS: We concluded the route of transmission was infection of dishes, spoons and chopsticks in the lunch buffet of June 30 by the underground water. At the lunch buffet, 50 dishes, 40 spoons, and chopsticks were served as cleaned and wiped with a dishcloth. We thought the underground water contaminated the dishes, spoons, chopsticks and the dishcloth. Those contaminated materials became the cause of this outbreak.
Summary

Citations

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  • Outbreaks, Germination, and Inactivation of Bacillus cereus in Food Products: A Review
    Won Choi, Sang-Soon Kim
    Journal of Food Protection.2020; 83(9): 1480.     CrossRef
  • The Bacillus cereus Food Infection as Multifactorial Process
    Nadja Jessberger, Richard Dietrich, Per Einar Granum, Erwin Märtlbauer
    Toxins.2020; 12(11): 701.     CrossRef
  • Surveillance of Bacillus cereus Isolates in Korea from 2012 to 2014
    Su-Mi Jung, Nan-Ok Kim, Injun Cha, Hae-young Na, Gyung Tae Chung, Hyo Sun Kawk, Sahyun Hong
    Osong Public Health and Research Perspectives.2017; 8(1): 71.     CrossRef
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    Jungho Yu, Changkeun Wang, Inchul Shin, Donguk Kim, Kwisung Park
    Korean Journal of Environmental Health Sciences.2016; 42(3): 189.     CrossRef
  • Cellular responses and proteomic analysis of hemolytic Bacillus cereus MH-2 exposed to epigallocatechin gallate (EGCG)
    Dong-Min Kim, Sang-Kook Park, Kye-Heon Oh
    The Korean Journal of Microbiology.2016; 52(3): 260.     CrossRef
  • Molecular Typing in Public Health Laboratories: From an Academic Indulgence to an Infection Control Imperative
    Franz Allerberger
    Journal of Preventive Medicine and Public Health.2012; 45(1): 1.     CrossRef
Brief Communication
An Outbreak of Novel Influenza A (H1N1) in the English Language Institute.
Joon Hyung Kim, Han Sung Lee, Hye Kyung Park, Jin Seok Kim, Sang Won Lee, Seong Sun Kim, Jong Koo Lee
J Prev Med Public Health. 2010;43(3):274-278.
DOI: https://doi.org/10.3961/jpmph.2010.43.3.274
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  • 1 Crossref
AbstractAbstract PDF
OBJECTIVES
This report describes the results of an investigation on an outbreak of novel influenza A (H1N1) in an English language Institute in Seoul, Korea in May 2009. METHODS: In this outbreak, novel influenza A (H1N1) was confirmed in 22 of 91 trainees, trainers and staff members. The trainees and 2 staff members were isolated in an assigned facility and the rest were isolated in their homes after we discovered the first patient with novel influenza A (H1N1). After the isolation, the people in the assigned facility were educated to use N95 respirators and they received oseltamivir for prophylaxis. RESULTS: The initial findings in this study suggest that the symptoms were mild and similar to those of seasonal influenza. The classmates and roommates of the infected patients were more likely to get infected with novel influenza A (H1N1) than the trainees who were not classmates or roommates of the patients (OR: 3.19, 95% CI=0.91 - 11.11 for classmates and OR: 40.0, 95% CI=7.4-215.7 for roommates). CONCLUSIONS: The public health response seems successful in terms of preventing the spread of this virus into the local community.
Summary

Citations

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  • In-Flight Transmission of Novel Influenza A (H1N1)
    Joon Hyung Kim, Dong-Han Lee, Sang-Sook Shin, Chun Kang, Jin Seok Kim, Byung Yool Jun, Jong-Koo Lee
    Epidemiology and Health.2010; 32: e2010006.     CrossRef
English Abstracts
Mumps Transmission Control Status and Inapparent Infection Rate among Middle and High School Students during the 2007-2008 Mumps Outbreak in Daegu.
Kyo Hyun Kim, Chang Hwi Kim, Bo Youl Choi, Un Yeong Go, Dong Han Lee, Moran Ki
J Prev Med Public Health. 2009;42(6):408-415.
DOI: https://doi.org/10.3961/jpmph.2009.42.6.408
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  • 4 Crossref
AbstractAbstract PDF
OBJECTIVES
This study was performed to investigate the mumps transmission control status and inapparent infection rate among middle and high school students in Daegu City during a mumps outbreak. METHODS: Nine schools (two middle schools and seven high schools), which reported a number of mumps cases between 2007 and 2008 were selected for investigation. During March-May 2008, a standard questionnaire was distributed to gather information about case identification, instructed isolation measure, isolation status of mumps cases and related factors, and outdoor activities of non-isolated mumps case. Inapparent infection rate was estimated by serum mumps IgM and IgG antibodies status and self-reported mumps symptoms in three of the nine schools. RESULTS: Among 2,560 respondents, more than half of students answered that they did not receive instructions in mumps transmission control measures during the outbreak. Among the 327 mumps cases identified by the questionnaire, 131 cases (40.1%) were considered as isolated and the isolation rates were significantly different among schools, grades, and gender. Of the non-isolated cases, 88.3% continued attending school. Inapparent mumps infection rates were between 56.3% and 70.2%. CONCLUSIONS: Mumps transmission control was inadequate to control the mumps outbreak. Although high inapparent infection rate would mitigate the transmission control effect of case isolation, this measure is fundamental for infection control. The reasons of this inadequate status need to be explored to develop an effective intervention strategy.
Summary

Citations

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  • Trend of measles, mumps, and rubella incidence following the measles‐rubella catch up vaccination in the Republic of Korea, 2001
    Young June Choe, Hye‐Eun Eom, Sung‐Il Cho
    Journal of Medical Virology.2017; 89(9): 1528.     CrossRef
  • Resurgence of Mumps in Korea
    Sun Hee Park
    Infection & Chemotherapy.2015; 47(1): 1.     CrossRef
  • An Outbreak of Mumps in a High School, Seoul, 2013
    Ha Ra Kang, Sung Yoon Kim, Hyo Hyun Cha, Young Min An, In Ah Park, Hae Ji Kang, Byung Wook Eun
    Pediatric Infection & Vaccine.2015; 22(1): 1.     CrossRef
  • Reappraisal of MMR vaccines currently used in Korea
    Hyunju Lee, Han Wool Kim, Hye Kyung Cho, Eun Ae Park, Kyong Min Choi, Kyung‐Hyo Kim
    Pediatrics International.2011; 53(3): 374.     CrossRef
Epidemiological Investigation of a Measles Outbreak in a Preschool in Incheon, Korea, 2006.
Jae Sung So, Un Yeong Go, Dong Han Lee, Koang Suk Park, Jong Koo Lee
J Prev Med Public Health. 2008;41(3):153-158.
DOI: https://doi.org/10.3961/jpmph.2008.41.3.153
  • 4,905 View
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  • 11 Crossref
AbstractAbstract PDF
OBJECTIVES
This study describes a plan that was designed to prevent a measles outbreak that showed a changed outbreak pattern. This study is based on the epidemiological investigation of a measles outbreak in a preschool in Incheon, Korea, 2006. METHODS: The subjects were 152 students at a preschool where a measles outbreak occurred. A questionnaire survey was conducted and serological testing for measlesspecific IgM was preformed. RESULTS: Of the fifteen confirmed, identified cases, eleven patients had been vaccinated with one dose, one patient had received two doses and three patients were unvaccinated. The three unvaccinated cases consisted of one 5-year-old child, one 3-year-old child and one 16-month-old infant. For the cases with one dose of the vaccination, there were 11 cases, which consisted of six 5-year-old children, two 4-year-old children, two 3-year-old children and one 2-year-old child. The case with two doses of the vaccination was one 4-year-old child. The attack rate of measles was 100% in the 0-dose group, 11.2% in the 1-dose group and 2.0% in the 2-dose group. The vaccine's efficacy was 88.8% in the 1-dose group and 98.0% in the 2-dose group. The vaccine effectiveness for the 2-dose group was higher than that of the 1-dose group. CONCLUSIONS: High coverage with a 2-dose vaccination should be maintained, and the vaccination should be given at the suitable time to prevent a measles outbreak with a changed outbreak pattern.
Summary

Citations

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  • Vaccines for measles, mumps, rubella, and varicella in children
    Carlo Di Pietrantonj, Alessandro Rivetti, Pasquale Marchione, Maria Grazia Debalini, Vittorio Demicheli
    Cochrane Database of Systematic Reviews.2021;[Epub]     CrossRef
  • Vaccines for measles, mumps, rubella, and varicella in children
    Carlo Di Pietrantonj, Alessandro Rivetti, Pasquale Marchione, Maria Grazia Debalini, Vittorio Demicheli
    Cochrane Database of Systematic Reviews.2020;[Epub]     CrossRef
  • Measles Elimination Activities in the Western Pacific Region: Experience from the Republic of Korea
    Young June Choe, Youngmee Jee, Myoung-don Oh, Jong-Koo Lee
    Journal of Korean Medical Science.2015; 30(Suppl 2): S115.     CrossRef
  • Epidemiological Investigation of a Measles Outbreak in Seoul, 2013~2014
    Heejin Ham, Jungim Jang, Changho Han
    Journal of Bacteriology and Virology.2015; 45(4): 372.     CrossRef
  • Vaccines for measles, mumps and rubella in children
    Vittorio Demicheli, Alessandro Rivetti, Maria Grazia Debalini, Carlo Di Pietrantonj
    Evidence-Based Child Health: A Cochrane Review Journal.2013; 8(6): 2076.     CrossRef
  • Reemergence of Measles in South Korea: Implications for Immunization and Surveillance Programs
    Young-Joon Park, Hye Suk Eom, Eun Seong Kim, Young June Choe, Geun-Ryang Bae, Duk-Hyoung Lee
    Japanese Journal of Infectious Diseases.2013; 66(1): 6.     CrossRef
  • Assessment of Serologic Immunity to Diphtheria-Tetanus-Pertussis After Treatment of Korean Pediatric Hematology and Oncology Patients
    Hyo Jin Kwon, Jae-Wook Lee, Nak-Gyun Chung, Bin Cho, Hack-Ki Kim, Jin Han Kang
    Journal of Korean Medical Science.2012; 27(1): 78.     CrossRef
  • Current status of measles in the Republic of Korea: an overview of case-based and seroepidemiological surveillance scheme
    Young June Choe, Geun-Ryang Bae
    Korean Journal of Pediatrics.2012; 55(12): 455.     CrossRef
  • Seroprevalence of measles among children affected by national measles elimination program in Korea, 2010
    Eun Seong Kim, Young June Choe, Heeyeon Cho, You-Jin Kim, Hee Sook Yoon, Jeong-Sun Yang, Kisoon Kim, Geun-Ryang Bae, Duk-hyoung Lee
    Vaccine.2012; 30(23): 3355.     CrossRef
  • Vaccines for measles, mumps and rubella in children
    Vittorio Demicheli, Alessandro Rivetti, Maria Grazia Debalini, Carlo Di Pietrantonj
    Cochrane Database of Systematic Reviews.2012;[Epub]     CrossRef
  • Evaluation of an Expanded Case Definition for Vaccine-Modified Measles in a School Outbreak in South Korea in 2010
    Young June Choe, Jae Kyung Hu, Kyung Min Song, Heeyeon Cho, Hee Sook Yoon, Seung Tae Kim, Han Jung Lee, Kisoon Kim, Geun-Ryang Bae, Jong-Koo Lee
    Japanese Journal of Infectious Diseases.2012; 65(5): 371.     CrossRef
Original Article
Epidemiologic Investigation on an Outbreak of Cholera in Gyeongsangbuk-do, Korea, 2001.
Jun Ho Lee, Hyun Sul Lim, Kwan Lee, Jun Chul Kim, Sang Won Lee, Un Yeong Go, Byung Kuk Yang, Jong Koo Lee, Moon Sik Kim
Korean J Prev Med. 2002;35(4):295-304.
  • 2,268 View
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AbstractAbstract PDF
OBJECTIVES
This study was carried out to investigate the cause, magnitude and transmission route of the cholera outbreak in 2001. METHODS: The study population were those persons who ingested foods at the restaurant, were confirmed as cholera patients, had symptoms of diarrhea and served as workers at the restaurant. A questionnaire survey and microbiological examinations on the microbes isolated from rectal swabs were conducted. Of the cases, 316 food histories were surveyed by an analysis of the restaurant menu. RESUJLTS: There were 139 confirmed cases of cholera reported in Korea in 2001. Of these, 104 were related to the restaurant. By region, Gyeongsangbuk-do had the highest incidence with 91 cases. Of these 91 cases, 74 had ingested foods at the restaurant, 2 were employees and 3 were secondary infection cases within the families. The results of the odds ratio analysis of the 316 persons having ingested foods at the restaurant were as follows: sandwiches 5.07 (95% CI, 1.85-14.59), soybean curd 2.45 (95% CI, 1.09-5.56), noodles 2.34 (95% CI, 1.24-4.42), steamed squid 2.01 (95% CI, 1.17-3.47) and vinegared rice 1.82 (95% CI, 1.08-3.09). It was certain the restaurant in question was the cause of the 2001 outbreak. CONCLUSIONS: We suspected that more than one restaurant employee contaminated foods served at the restaurant. In addition, eating raw fishes purchased at the Pohang Fisheries infected the employees of the restaurant. There is a possibility that these raw fishes were themselves contaminated by cholera bacilli in the sea.
Summary

JPMPH : Journal of Preventive Medicine and Public Health