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HOME > Korean J Prev Med > Volume 36(1); 2003 > Article
Original Article The Association between the Psychosocial Well-being Status and Adverse Lipid Profiles in a Rural Korean Community.
Chang Hoon Kim, Myoung Hee Kim, Sung Il Cho, Jung Hyun Nam, Bo Youl Choi
Journal of Preventive Medicine and Public Health 2003;36(1):24-32
DOI: https://doi.org/
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1Department of Preventive Medicine, Hanyang University College of Medicine, Korea. bychoi@hanyang.ac.kr
2Department of Preventive Medicine, EulJi University school of Medicine, Korea.
3Seoul National University Graduate School of Public Health, Korea.
4Department of Psychiatry, Hanyang University College of Medicine, Korea.

OBJECTIVES
To identify the psychosocial well-being status in a rural community, and examine the association between the psychosocial well-being status and adverse lipid profile. METHOD: In 2001, we surveyed 575 subjects in Yangpyoung, Kyounggido, including medical examination, fasting-blood sample and questionnaires for the psychosocial well-being status, socioeconomic position and behavioral risk factors. The logistic regression analysis was used to examine explanatory factors of the psychosocial well-being status, and association between the psychosocial well-being status and adverse lipid profiles. RESULT: The association between the psychosocial well-being status and adverse lipid profiles was not strong. The total cholesterol and triglyceridelevels were associated with psychosocial well-being. The adjusted odds ratio for moderate psychosocial well-being relating to total cholesterol was 1.90 (95%CI, 0.82-4.04), but that for triglyceride was 0.65 (95%CI, 0.36-1.21). The HDL-Cholesterol and LDL-Cholesterol level were not associated with the psychosocial well-being status. CONCLUSION: The total cholesterol and psychosocial well-being status were weakly associated, but the between the psychosocial well-being status and adverse lipid profiles were not consistent.


JPMPH : Journal of Preventive Medicine and Public Health