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JPMPH : Journal of Preventive Medicine and Public Health

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Na Young Sung 3 Articles
Women's Willingness to Pay for Cancer Screenin.
Min Son Kwak, Na Young Sung, Jeong Hee Yang, Eun Cheol Park, Kui Son Choi
J Prev Med Public Health. 2006;39(4):331-338.
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AbstractAbstract PDF
OBJECTIVES
The goal of this study is to measure women's willingness to pay for cancer screening and to identify those factors associated with this willingness to pay METHODS: A population-based telephone survey was performed on 1,562 women (aged 30 years or over) for 2 weeks (9-23th, July, 2004). Data about sociodemographic characteristics, health behaviors, the intention of the cancer screenings and willingness to pay for cancer screening were collected. 1,400 respondents were included in the analysis. The women's willingness to pay for cancer screening and the factors associated with this willingness to pay were evaluated. RESULTS: The results show that 76% of all respondents have a willingness to pay for cancer screening. Among those who are willing to pay, the average and median amount of money for which the respondents are willing to pay are 126,636 (s.d.: 58,414) and 120,000 won, respectively. As the status of education & the income are higher, the average amount that women are willing to pay becomes much more. The amount of money women are willing to pay is the highest during the 'contemplation' stage. Being willing to pay or not is associated with a change of behavior (transtheoretical model), the income, the concern about the cancer risk, the family cancer history, the marital status, the general health exam, age and the place of residence. Income is associated with a greater willingness to pay. Old age was associated with a lower willingness to pay. CONCLUSIONS: According to the two-part model, income and TTM are the most important variables associated with the willingness to pay for cancer screening. The cancer screening participation rate is low compared with the willingness to pay for cancer screening. It is thought that we have to consider the participants' behavior that&s associated with cancer screening and their willingness to pay in order to organize and manage cancer screening program.
Summary
Factors Associated with Cancer Screening Participation, Korea.
Min Son Kwak, Eun Chul Park, Jin Young Bang, Na Young Sung, Ji Young Lee, Kui Son Choi
J Prev Med Public Health. 2005;38(4):473-481.
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AbstractAbstract PDF
OBJECTIVES
We wanted to identify those factors associated with stomach, colon, breast and cervix cancer screening. METHODS: A population-based telephone survey was conducted for 2 weeks (the 9th-23th of July, 2004) by trained interviewers with using a questionnaire. 2, 598 respondents (females aged 30 years or over, and the males aged 40 years or over) were selected by random-digit dialing that was based on the 2000 Population and Housing Census. The data on socio-demographic, health behavior and enabling factors were collected. 2, 571 respondents were included in analysis. The cancer screening rate was classified into 2 categories : the life time screening rate and the screening rate with recommendations. RESULTS: For the 2, 571 respondents, the life time screening rate was as follows: 52.0% (Stomach), 25.3% (Colon), 55.9% (Breast) and 76.8% (Cervix). The screening rate with recommendation was as follows: 39.2% (Stomach), 20.6% (Colon), 42.5% (Breast) and 58.3% (Cervix). On a multiple logistic regression analysis of the life time screening, statistically significant relationships were observed for the screening intention, the health exam, the disease history, the age of the patients and the cancer screening rates. On a multiple logistic regression analysis of the screening with recommendation, statistically significant relationships were observed for the screening intention, the health exam, the age of the patients, the concern about the risk of cancer, the voluntary health insurance for cancer and the cancer screening rates. CONCLUSIONS: The results of this study suggest that the cancer screening intention, the health exam and the age of the patients are the most important factors to participate in life time cancer screening and also screening with recommendations. A positive association was also observed for the concern about the risk of cancer, the voluntary health insurance for cancer. It is hoped that this study will be a base line data for suggesting the representative cancer screening rate in Korea.
Summary
Participation Rate and Related Socio-demographic Factors in the National Cancer Screening Program.
Na Young Sung, Eun Cheol Park, Hai Rim Shin, Kui Son Choi
J Prev Med Public Health. 2005;38(1):93-100.
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AbstractAbstract PDF
BACKGROUND
Cancer is the leading cause of death and one of the largest burdens of disease in Korea. In 1996, the 'Ten year Plan for Cancer Control' was formulated and the government then adopted the plan as a national policy. As part of this plan, the National Cancer Screening Program (NCSP) for Medicaid recipients was formulated, and the government adapted this in 1999. For low-income beneficiaries of the National Health Insurance Corporation (NHIC), the screening program has been in place since 2002. In 2002, the target cancers of NCSP were stomach, breast and cervical cancer. This study was conducted to examine the relationships between the participation rate, the abnormal screening rate and the socio-demographic factors associated with participation in the screening program. METHODS: To analyze the participation rate and abnormal rate for the NCSP, we used the 2002 NCSP records. The information on the socio-demographic factors was available from the database of the beneficiaries in the NHIC and Medicaid. RESULTS: The participation rate of the Medicaid beneficiaries for the stomach, breast and cervical cancer screening were 9.2%, 15.5% and 15.0%, respectively, and 11.3% and 12.5%, except cervical cancer which wasn't be included in the NCSP, for the beneficiaries of the NHIC. The abnormal rate of stomach, breast and cervical cancer screening were 25.7%, 11.2% and 21.0%, respectively, for the beneficiaries of Medicaid and 42.6% and 19.4% for the beneficiaries of the NHIC. On the multiple logistic regression analysis, gender, age and place of residence were significantly associated with participation rates of the NCSP. For stomach cancer, women participated in the NCSP more than men. The participation rate was higher among people in their fifties and sixties than for those people in their forties and those people over seventy years in age. For the breast and cervical cancer, people in their fifties were more likely to participate in the NCSP than people in their forties and people over sixty. For the place of residence, people in the rural areas participated more than those people in any other places. CONCLUSIONS: The above results show that the participation rate and abnormal rate were significantly associated with the socio-demographic factors. To improve the participation rate for the NCSP, more attention should be given to the underserved groups.
Summary

JPMPH : Journal of Preventive Medicine and Public Health