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JPMPH : Journal of Preventive Medicine and Public Health

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Original Article
Analysis of the Incidence of Macrosomia in Japan by Parental Nationalities at 5-year Intervals From 1995 to 2020
Tasuku Okui
J Prev Med Public Health. 2023;56(4):348-356.   Published online July 3, 2023
DOI: https://doi.org/10.3961/jpmph.23.133
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AbstractAbstract PDFSupplementary Material
Objectives
We investigated trends in the incidence rate of macrosomia and its association with parental nationalities using Vital Statistics data in Japan.
Methods
We used singleton birth data every 5 years from 1995 to 2020. The incidence rate of macrosomia was calculated according to specific attributes (maternal age, infant’s sex, parental nationalities, parity, and household occupation) over time (years). In addition, a log-binomial model was used to investigate the relationship between the incidence of macrosomia and the attributes. This study compared Korea, China, the Philippines, Brazil, and other countries with Japan in terms of parental nationalities. “Other countries” indicates countries except for Japan, Korea, China, the Philippines, and Brazil.
Results
The study included 6 180 787 births. The rate of macrosomia in Japan decreased from 1.43% in 1995 to 0.88% in 2020, and the decrease was observed across all parental nationalities. The rates for Japanese parents were the lowest values among parental nationalities during the timespan investigated. Multivariate regression analysis showed that mothers from Korea, China, the Philippines, Brazil, and other countries had a significantly higher risk of macrosomia than those from Japan (risk ratio, 1.91, 2.82, 1.59, 1.74, and 1.64, respectively). Furthermore, fathers from China, the Philippines, Brazil, and other countries had a significantly higher risk of macrosomia than those from Japan (risk ratio, 1.66, 1.38, 1.88, and 3.02, respectively).
Conclusions
The rate of macrosomia decreased from 1995 to 2020 in Japan for parents of all nationalities, and the risk of macrosomia incidence was associated with parental nationality.
Summary

JPMPH : Journal of Preventive Medicine and Public Health