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Association Between Objective Social Isolation and Unmet Medical Needs: A Nationwide Cross-sectional Study in Korea
Jeong Min Yang, Seul Ki Lee, Jae Hyun Kim
J Prev Med Public Health. 2024;57(3):242-251.   Published online April 27, 2024
DOI: https://doi.org/10.3961/jpmph.23.516
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  • 105 Download
AbstractAbstract AbstractSummary PDFSupplementary Material
Objectives
The aim of this study was to analyze the relationship between objective social isolation (SI) and unmet medical needs (UMN) in adults aged 19 and older.
Methods
A cross-sectional analysis was conducted of 208 619 adults aged 19 and older, excluding missing data, using the 2019 Korea Community Health Survey. To analyze the association between objective SI and UMN, the chi-square test and logistic regression analysis were performed.
Results
The prevalence of UMN was 1.14 times higher (odds ratio [OR], 1.14; 95% confidence interval [CI], 1.06 to 1.23) among those with SI than among those without SI, and the OR for groups with 5 SI types was 2.77 (95% CI, 1.86 to 4.12) compared to those with no SI types. In addition, a stratified analysis by age group showed that the association between SI and UMN existed even in groups under 64 years old. However, among those aged 65 and older, SI was associated with an OR of 1.53 (95% CI, 1.37 to 1.71) for UMN compared to non-SI. As the number of SI types increased, the prevalence of UMN also increased, indicating a strong association between SI and UMN in older adults.
Conclusions
This study found that individuals with SI experienced UMN due to fear and anxiety about interpersonal relationships. Therefore, based on the results of this cross-sectional study, it is necessary to investigate the causal relationship between SI and UMN through future longitudinal data.
Summary
Korean summary
본 연구는 2019년 지역사회건강조사를 활용하여 사회적 고립과 미충족의료 간의 연관성을 분석한 연구이다. 분석 결과 사회적 고립이 있을 경우 비사회적고립 집단에 비하여 미충족의료 경험률이 높았고, 사회적 고립의 강도가 높아질수록 강한 연관성을 발견할 수 있었다. 본 연구 결과를 바탕으로 미충족의료 취약 집단에 대한 정책적, 제도적 기반 마련이 요구된다.
Key Message
This study analyzed the association between social isolation and unmet medical needs using the 2019 Korea Community Health Survey. The analysis revealed that individuals experiencing social isolation had a higher rate of unmet medical needs compared to the non-social isolation group. Furthermore, a stronger association was observed as the intensity of social isolation increased. Based on the results of this study, there is a need to establish policy and institutional foundations to support vulnerable groups with unmet medical needs.
The Effect of Cognitive Impairment on the Association Between Social Network Properties and Mortality Among Older Korean Adults
Eunji Kim, Kiho Sung, Chang Oh Kim, Yoosik Youm, Hyeon Chang Kim
J Prev Med Public Health. 2023;56(1):31-40.   Published online November 22, 2022
DOI: https://doi.org/10.3961/jpmph.22.350
  • 4,362 View
  • 161 Download
AbstractAbstract AbstractSummary PDFSupplementary Material
Objectives
This study investigated the effect of cognitive impairment on the association between social network properties and mortality among older Korean adults.
Methods
This study used data from the Korean Social Life, Health, and Aging Project. It obtained 814 older adults’ complete network maps across an entire village in 2011-2012. Participants’ deaths until December 31, 2020 were confirmed by cause-of-death statistics. A Cox proportional hazards model was used to assess the risks of poor social network properties (low degree centrality, perceived loneliness, social non-participation, group-level segregation, and lack of support) on mortality according to cognitive impairment.
Results
In total, 675 participants (5510.4 person-years) were analyzed, excluding those with missing data and those whose deaths could not be verified. Along with cognitive impairment, all social network properties except loneliness were independently associated with mortality. When stratified by cognitive function, some variables indicating poor social relations had higher risks among older adults with cognitive impairment, with adjusted hazard ratios (HRs) of 2.12 (95% confidence interval [CI], 1.34 to 3.35) for social nonparticipation, 1.58 (95% CI, 0.94 to 2.65) for group-level segregation, and 3.44 (95% CI, 1.55 to 7.60) for lack of support. On the contrary, these effects were not observed among those with normal cognition, with adjusted HRs of 0.73 (95% CI, 0.31 to 1.71), 0.96 (95% CI, 0.42 to 2.21), and 0.95 (95% CI, 0.23 to 3.96), respectively.
Conclusions
The effect of social network properties was more critical among the elderly with cognitive impairment. Older adults with poor cognitive function are particularly encouraged to participate in social activities to reduce the risk of mortality.
Summary
Korean summary
고령인구에서의 불충분한 사회연결망 특성은 높은 사망 위험과 연관이 있었으며, 이는 인지기능이 저하된 그룹에서 그렇지 않은 군에 비해 더 높게 관찰되었다. 특히, 인지기능이 저하된 노인에서 사회활동들에 참여하지 않는 것, 한정된 소집단에만 속하는 것, 주변으로부터 도움을 받지 못하는 것은 높은 사망 위험과 연관이 있기 때문에, 이들의 사회연결망을 강화하는 것이 사망 위험을 낮추는 데 도움이 될 수 있다.
Can Obesity Cause Depression? A Pseudo-panel Analysis
Hyungserk Ha, Chirok Han, Beomsoo Kim
J Prev Med Public Health. 2017;50(4):262-267.   Published online June 27, 2017
DOI: https://doi.org/10.3961/jpmph.17.067
  • 12,243 View
  • 240 Download
  • 18 Crossref
AbstractAbstract PDF
Objectives
The US ranks ninth in obesity in the world, and approximately 7% of US adults experience major depressive disorder. Social isolation due to the stigma attached to obesity might trigger depression. Methods: This paper examined the impact of obesity on depression. To overcome the endogeneity problem, we constructed pseudopanel data using the Behavioral Risk Factor Surveillance System from 1997 to 2008. Results: The results were robust, and body mass index (BMI) was found to have a positive effect on depression days and the percentage of depressed individuals in the population. Conclusions: We attempted to overcome the endogeneity problem by using a pseudo-panel approach and found that increases in the BMI increased depression days (or being depressed) to a statistically significant extent, with a large effect size.
Summary

Citations

Citations to this article as recorded by  
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    Ayça ŞOLT, Derya KANZA GÜL
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    Journal of Pediatric Endocrinology and Metabolism.2021; 34(12): 1593.     CrossRef
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    Olivia Remes, João Francisco Mendes, Peter Templeton
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Perspective
A New Measure for Assessing the Public Health Response to a Middle East Respiratory Syndrome Coronavirus Outbreak
Sung-il Cho
J Prev Med Public Health. 2015;48(6):277-279.   Published online November 30, 2015
DOI: https://doi.org/10.3961/jpmph.15.069
  • 11,048 View
  • 84 Download
  • 3 Crossref
AbstractAbstract PDF
Contact monitoring is an essential component of the public health response to a Middle East respiratory syndrome coronavirus outbreak, and is required for an effective quarantine to contain the epidemic. The timeliness of a quarantine is associated with its effectiveness. This paper provides a conceptual framework to describe the process of contact monitoring, and proposes a new measure called the “timely quarantined proportion” as a tool to assess the adequacy of a public health response.
Summary

Citations

Citations to this article as recorded by  
  • New framework to assess tracing and testing based on South Korea’s response to COVID-19
    Junhyoung Kim, Suyoung Jo, Sung-il Cho
    BMC Infectious Diseases.2024;[Epub]     CrossRef
  • The relationship between moral sensitivity and caring behavior among nurses in iran during COVID-19 pandemic
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    Ock-Joo Kim
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English Abstract
Mumps Transmission Control Status and Inapparent Infection Rate among Middle and High School Students during the 2007-2008 Mumps Outbreak in Daegu.
Kyo Hyun Kim, Chang Hwi Kim, Bo Youl Choi, Un Yeong Go, Dong Han Lee, Moran Ki
J Prev Med Public Health. 2009;42(6):408-415.
DOI: https://doi.org/10.3961/jpmph.2009.42.6.408
  • 5,210 View
  • 47 Download
  • 5 Crossref
AbstractAbstract PDF
OBJECTIVES
This study was performed to investigate the mumps transmission control status and inapparent infection rate among middle and high school students in Daegu City during a mumps outbreak. METHODS: Nine schools (two middle schools and seven high schools), which reported a number of mumps cases between 2007 and 2008 were selected for investigation. During March-May 2008, a standard questionnaire was distributed to gather information about case identification, instructed isolation measure, isolation status of mumps cases and related factors, and outdoor activities of non-isolated mumps case. Inapparent infection rate was estimated by serum mumps IgM and IgG antibodies status and self-reported mumps symptoms in three of the nine schools. RESULTS: Among 2,560 respondents, more than half of students answered that they did not receive instructions in mumps transmission control measures during the outbreak. Among the 327 mumps cases identified by the questionnaire, 131 cases (40.1%) were considered as isolated and the isolation rates were significantly different among schools, grades, and gender. Of the non-isolated cases, 88.3% continued attending school. Inapparent mumps infection rates were between 56.3% and 70.2%. CONCLUSIONS: Mumps transmission control was inadequate to control the mumps outbreak. Although high inapparent infection rate would mitigate the transmission control effect of case isolation, this measure is fundamental for infection control. The reasons of this inadequate status need to be explored to develop an effective intervention strategy.
Summary

Citations

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JPMPH : Journal of Preventive Medicine and Public Health