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Original Articles
Mental Health Among Healthcare Workers During the COVID-19 Pandemic in Vietnam
Nhan Phuc Thanh Nguyen, Ha Phan Ai Nguyen, Cao Khoa Dang, Minh Tri Phan, Huynh Ho Ngoc Quynh, Van Tuan Le, Chinh Van Dang, Tinh Huu Ho, Van Trong Phan, Thang Van Dinh, Thang Phan, Thi Anh Thu Dang
J Prev Med Public Health. 2024;57(1):37-46.   Published online December 11, 2023
DOI: https://doi.org/10.3961/jpmph.23.327
  • 603 View
  • 81 Download
AbstractAbstract AbstractSummary PDF
Objectives
The objective of this study was to characterize mental health issues among Vietnamese healthcare workers (HCWs) and to identify related factors.
Methods
A cross-sectional study was conducted with 990 HCWs in 2021. Their mental health status was measured using the Depression, Anxiety, and Stress Scale.
Results
In total, 49.9%, 52.3%, and 29.8% of respondents were found to have depression, anxiety, and stress, respectively. The multivariable linear regression model revealed that factors associated with increased anxiety scores included depression scores (β, 0.45; 95% confidence interval [CI], 0.39 to 0.51) and stress scores (β, 0.46; 95% CI, 0.41 to 0.52). Factors associated with increased depression scores included being frontline HCWs (β, 0.57; 95% CI, 0.10 to 1.10), stress scores (β, 0.50; 95% CI, 0.45 to 0.56), and anxiety scores (β, 0.41; 95% CI, 0.36 to 0.47), while working experience was associated with reduced depression scores (β, -0.08; 95% CI, -0.16 to -0.01). Factors associated with increased stress scores included working experience (β, 0.08; 95% CI, 0.00 to 0.16), personal protective equipment interference with daily activities (β, 0.55; 95% CI, 0.07 to 1.00), depression scores (β, 0.54; 95% CI, 0.48 to 0.59), and anxiety scores (β, 0.45; 95% CI, 0.39 to 0.50), while age was associated with reduced stress scores (β, -0.12; 95% CI, -0.20 to -0.05).
Conclusions
Specific interventions are necessary to enhance and promote the mental health of HCWs so they can successfully cope with the circumstances of the pandemic.
Summary
Key Message
A cross-sectional study of 990 Vietnamese healthcare workers in Vietnam, 2021 revealed significant mental health issues: 49.9 % suffered from depression, 52.3 % from anxiety, and 29.8 % from stress. The study found a correlation between these conditions, with frontline workers being particularly vulnerable to depression. These findings highlight the critical need for targeted mental health interventions for healthcare workers, particularly those new to the field and working on the front lines, in order to better manage pandemic-related stressors.
Reliability of a Newly Developed Tool to Assess and Classify Work-related Stress (TAWS-16) for Indian Workforce
Gautham Melur Sukumar, Runalika Roy, Mariamma Philip, Gururaj Gopalkrishna
J Prev Med Public Health. 2023;56(5):407-412.   Published online August 19, 2023
DOI: https://doi.org/10.3961/jpmph.23.219
  • 952 View
  • 77 Download
AbstractAbstract AbstractSummary PDF
Objectives
Work stress is associated with non-communicable diseases, increased healthcare costs, and decreased work productivity among employees in the information technology sector. There is a need for regular work-stress screening among employees using valid and reliable tools. The Tool to Assess and Classify Work Stress (TAWS-16) was developed to overcome limitations in existing stress assessment tools in India. This study aimed to test the reliability of TAWS-16 in a sample of managerial-supervisory employees.
Methods
This observational reliability study included data from 62 employees. Test-retest and inter-method reliability were investigated using a TAWS-16 web application and interview by telephone, respectively. Kappa values and intra-class correlation coefficients were calculated. Internal consistency was assessed through Cronbach’s alpha.
Results
For both test-retest and inter-method reliability, the agreement for both work-related factors and symptoms suggestive of work stress exceeded 80%, and all kappa values were 0.40 or higher. Cronbach’s alpha for test-retest and inter-method reliability was 0.983 and 0.941, respectively.
Conclusions
TAWS-16 demonstrated acceptable reliability. It measured stressors, coping abilities, and psychosomatic symptoms associated with work stress. We recommend using TAWS-16 to holistically identify work stress among employees during periodical health check-ups in India.
Summary
Key Message
The study assessed test-retest and inter-method reliability of Tool to Assess Work Stress (TAWS – 16) developed by Centre for Public Health, National Institute of Mental Health and Neurosciences (NIMHANS) on 62 employees in Bengaluru, India. Kappa statistics, Intra-class correlation coefficient (ICC) and Cronbach’s alpha were calculated. TAWS – 16 demonstrated acceptable reliability, good internal consistency and can be used to identify work stress among employees during periodical health check-ups in Indian setting.
Gender Inequalities in Mental Health During the COVID-19 Pandemic: A Population-based Study in Korea
Minku Kang, Sarah Yu, Seung-Ah Choe, Daseul Moon, Myung Ki, Byung Chul Chun
J Prev Med Public Health. 2023;56(5):413-421.   Published online August 19, 2023
DOI: https://doi.org/10.3961/jpmph.23.170
  • 1,128 View
  • 84 Download
AbstractAbstract AbstractSummary PDFSupplementary Material
Objectives
This study explored the effect of the coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) pandemic on psychosocial stress in prime working-age individuals in Korea, focusing on gender inequalities. We hypothesized that the impact of COVID-19 on mental health would differ by age and gender, with younger women potentially demonstrating heightened vulnerability relative to men.
Methods
The study involved data from the Korea Community Health Survey and included 319 592 adults aged 30 years to 49 years. We employed log-binomial regression analysis, controlling for variables including age, education, employment status, marital status, and the presence of children. The study period included 3 phases: the period prior to the COVID-19 outbreak (pre–COVID-19), the early pandemic, and the period following the introduction of vaccinations (post-vaccination).
Results
The findings indicated that women were at a heightened risk of psychosocial stress during the early pandemic (relative risk [RR], 1.01; 95% confidence interval [CI], 0.98 to 1.05) and post-vaccination period (RR, 1.07; 95% CI, 1.04 to 1.10) compared to men. This pattern was prominent in urban women aged 30-34 years (pre–COVID-19: RR, 1.06; 95% CI, 1.02 to 1.10; early pandemic: RR, 1.16; 95% CI, 1.08 to 1.25; post-vaccination period, RR, 1.22; 95% CI, 1.14 to 1.31).
Conclusions
The COVID-19 pandemic has exerted unequal impacts on psychosocial stress among prime working-age individuals in Korea, with women, particularly those in urban areas, experiencing a heightened risk. The findings highlight the importance of addressing gender-specific needs and implementing appropriate interventions to mitigate the psychosocial consequences of the pandemic.
Summary
Korean summary
코로나19 대유행이 국내 경제활동인구의 정신건강에 미친 젠더화된 영향을 조사하였다. 연구대상자는 2017-2021년 지역사회건강조사 조사대상자 319,592명이다. 연구 결과, 대유행 이후 30-39세 연령대 여성의 스트레스 수준이 남성에 비하여 현저히 증가한 것으로 나타났으며, 사회적 거리두기를 엄격하게 시행하였던 도시 지역에서 이러한 경향이 두드러졌다. 이번 연구 결과는 대유행 대응 노력에서 취약 집단을 지원하기 위한 중재 정책의 필요성을 강조한다
Key Message
We investigate the gendered impact of the COVID-19 pandemic on the mental health of the working-age population in Korea, focusing on ages 30-49, utilizing data from the Korea Community Health Survey (KCHS) from 2017 to 2021 including 319,592 participants. Findings reveal a notable increase in stress levels among women in the 30-39 age group after the pandemic compared to men, accentuating in urban areas with stringent social distancing measures. Our results underscore the necessity for intervention policies to support vulnerable groups in pandemic response efforts.
Perspective
Gender in Climate Change: Safeguarding LGBTQ+ Mental Health in the Philippine Climate Change Response From a Minority Stress Perspective
Rowalt Alibudbud
J Prev Med Public Health. 2023;56(2):196-199.   Published online March 13, 2023
DOI: https://doi.org/10.3961/jpmph.22.501
  • 2,468 View
  • 112 Download
  • 4 Web of Science
  • 4 Crossref
AbstractAbstract PDF
Climate-related events unevenly affect society, worsening mental health disparities among vulnerable populations. This paper highlights that lesbians, gays, bisexuals, transgender, queers, and other individuals identifying as sexual and gender minorities (LGBTQ+) could be considered a climate-vulnerable population in the Philippines, one of the most climate-vulnerable countries. As such, this paper elucidated that LGBTQ+ Filipinos can be marginalized in climate response efforts due to their sexual orientation and gender minority identities. According to the minority stress theory, discrimination against LGBTQ+ individuals may predispose them to mental health problems. Thus, there is a need to institute an LGBTQ+ inclusive mental health response for climate-related events to address discrimination against LGBTQ+ individuals and uphold their mental health.
Summary

Citations

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  • A human rights‐based approach to climate injustices at the local, national, and international levels: Program and policy recommendations
    Sheri R. Levy, Meroona Gopang, Luisa Ramírez, Allan B. I. Bernardo, Martin D. Ruck, Anni Sternisko
    Social Issues and Policy Review.2024; 18(1): 3.     CrossRef
  • Leveraging critical race theory to produce equitable climate change adaptation
    Kieren Rudge
    Nature Climate Change.2023; 13(7): 623.     CrossRef
  • Mental health service, training, promotion, and research during typhoons: Climate change experiences from the Philippines
    Rowalt Alibudbud
    Asian Journal of Psychiatry.2023; 86: 103673.     CrossRef
  • Geopsychiatry and political determinants of mental health in the Philippines
    Rowalt Alibudbud
    International Journal of Social Psychiatry.2023;[Epub]     CrossRef
Original Articles
The Outcomes of an e-Wellness Program for Lupus Patients in Thailand: A Participatory Action Research Approach
Nop T. Ratanasiripong, Steven Cahill, Christine Crane, Paul Ratanasiripong
J Prev Med Public Health. 2023;56(2):154-163.   Published online March 9, 2023
DOI: https://doi.org/10.3961/jpmph.22.491
  • 2,228 View
  • 107 Download
AbstractAbstract PDF
Objectives
Systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) or lupus patients usually experience various physical and psychological challenges. Since the coronavirus disease 2019 pandemic, these challenges have become even harsher. Using the participatory action research approach, this study evaluated how an e-wellness program (eWP) impacted SLE-related knowledge and health behaviors, mental health, and quality of life among lupus patients in Thailand.
Methods
A 1-group, pretest-posttest design study was conducted among a purposive sample of lupus patients who were members of Thai SLE Foundation. The 2 main intervention components were: (1) online social support, and (2) lifestyle and stress management workshops. Sixty-eight participants completed all the study requirements, including the Physical and Psychosocial Health Assessment questionnaire.
Results
After being in the eWP for 3 months, participants’ mean score for SLE-related knowledge increased significantly (t=5.3, p<0.001). The increase in sleep hours was statistically significant (Z=-3.1, p<0.01), with the percentage of participants who slept less than 7 hours decreasing from 52.9% to 29.0%. The percentage of participants reporting sun exposure decreased from 17.7% to 8.8%. The participants also reported significantly lower stress (t(66)=-4.4, p<0.001) and anxiety (t(67)=-2.9, p=0.005). The post-eWP quality of life scores for the pain, planning, intimate relationship, burden to others, emotional health, and fatigue domains also improved significantly (p<0.05).
Conclusions
The overall outcomes showed promising results of improved self-care knowledge, health behaviors, mental health status, and quality of life. It is recommended that the SLE Foundation continues to use the eWP model to help the lupus patient community.
Summary
Determinants of Depression in Indonesian Youth: Findings From a Community-based Survey
Indri Yunita Suryaputri, Rofingatul Mubasyiroh, Sri Idaiani, Lely Indrawati
J Prev Med Public Health. 2022;55(1):88-97.   Published online December 28, 2021
DOI: https://doi.org/10.3961/jpmph.21.113
  • 3,849 View
  • 214 Download
  • 1 Web of Science
  • 2 Crossref
AbstractAbstract PDF
Objectives
This study investigated the determinants of depression in adolescents and young adults.
Methods
The present study analyzed data from the 2018 Indonesia Basic Health Survey (Riset Kesehatan Dasar; RISKESDAS). The study subjects were adolescents (15-17 years old) and young adults (18-24 years old). In total, 64 179 subjects were included. Univariable, bivariable, and multivariable logistic regression analyses were performed to determine associations between youths’ characteristics, risky behavior, chronic disease, parents’ health, and youths’ depression.
Results
The prevalence of depression was 5.1% in adolescents and 5.6% in young adults. The risk factors for depression in adolescents were being women (adjusted odds ratio [aOR], 3.53; 95% confidence interval [CI], 2.89 to 4.30; p<0.001), an ex-smoker (aOR, 2.99; 95% CI, 2.10 to 4.25; p<0.001), or a current smoker (aOR, 2.60; 95% CI, 1.97 to 3.44; p<0.001); consuming alcohol (aOR, 2.00; 95% CI, 1.33 to 3.01; p=0.001), having a chronic disease (aOR, 2.64; 95% CI, 1.41 to 4.96; p=0.002); maternal depression (aOR, 2.47; 95% CI, 1.97 to 3.09; p<0.001); and paternal depression (aOR, 2.63; 95% CI, 1.98 to 3.50; p<0.001). In young adults, the risk factors were being women (aOR, 2.23; 95% CI, 1.82 to 2.75; p<0.001) or an ex-smoker (aOR, 2.47; 95% CI, 1.67 to 3.67; p<0.001), consuming alcohol (aOR, 2.42; 95% CI, 1.89 to 3.09; p<0.001), maternal depression (aOR, 3.12; 95% CI, 2.54 to 3.84; p<0.001), and paternal depression (aOR, 2.80; 95% CI, 2.17 to 3.63; p<0.001).
Conclusions
Being women, smoking, drinking alcohol, having a chronic disease, and having a parent with depression were crucial factors associated with youth depression. Mental health screening, prevention, and treatment should involve collaboration among primary healthcare, schools, universities, professionals, and families.
Summary

Citations

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  • Mental health issues and quality of life amongst school-based adolescents in Indonesia
    Andry Juliansen, Rivaldo Steven Heriyanto, Michelle Patricia Muljono, Charista Lydia Budiputri, Yulita Delfia Sari Sagala, Gilbert Sterling Octavius
    Journal of Medicine, Surgery, and Public Health.2024; 2: 100062.     CrossRef
  • Barriers and facilitators to access mental health services among people with mental disorders in Indonesia: A qualitative study
    Lafi Munira, Pranee Liamputtong, Pramon Viwattanakulvanid
    Belitung Nursing Journal.2023; 9(2): 110.     CrossRef
Associations of Handgrip Strength and Handgrip Strength Asymmetry With Depression in the Elderly in Korea: A Cross-sectional Study
Kyungduk Hurh, Yoonsik Park, Gyu Ri Kim, Sung-In Jang, Eun-Cheol Park
J Prev Med Public Health. 2021;54(1):63-72.   Published online December 30, 2020
DOI: https://doi.org/10.3961/jpmph.20.315
  • 3,701 View
  • 149 Download
  • 13 Web of Science
  • 13 Crossref
AbstractAbstract AbstractSummary PDFSupplementary Material
Objectives
Recent studies have suggested that assessing handgrip strength (HGS) asymmetry together with HGS may be helpful for evaluating problems in geriatric patients. This study aimed to identify whether HGS asymmetry, weakness, or both were associated with depression in Korean older adults.
Methods
This study included 4274 subjects from the sixth and seventh Korea National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey. Depression was measured using the Patient Health Questionnaire-9. The maximum HGS of the dominant hand was used as a representative value. HGS symmetry was categorized by the ratio of the HGS of the dominant hand to that of non-dominant hand. The odds ratio (OR) for depression was calculated according to the HGS and its symmetry.
Results
In total, 240 (12.5%) men and 534 (22.7%) women had depression. HGS or HGS asymmetry showed no statistically significant associations with depression in elderly men. Elevated odds of depression were observed in elderly women with low HGS (OR, 1.93; 95% confidence interval [CI], 1.33 to 2.81) or prominent HGS asymmetry (OR, 1.46; 95% CI, 1.02 to 2.08). There was a positive additive interaction between asymmetric HGS and weakness, as women with low and prominently asymmetric HGS showed higher odds of depression (OR, 3.77; 95% CI, 2.16 to 6.59) than women with high and symmetric HGS.
Conclusions
Depression in elderly Korean women was associated with both low and asymmetric HGS. Our findings support the potential value of HGS asymmetry as an indicator of HGS.
Summary
Korean summary
본 연구에서는 국민건강영양조사 자료를 이용하여, 국내 60세 이상 노인 인구에서 악력 저하 및 양손 악력의 비대칭과 우울증 유병과의 상관관계를 분석하였다. 분석 결과 60세 이상 여성에서 악력 저하 및 양손 악력의 비대칭이 우울증 유병과 관련이 있었으며, 악력 저하와 비대칭이 동반된 경우에는 우울증 유병에 대하여 상가작용이 존재하였다. 이는 향후 노인의 악력 측정 시, 양손 악력의 비대칭에 대하여도 주목할 필요가 있음을 시사한다.

Citations

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  • Handgrip strength asymmetry cut points to identify slow gait speed in six low- and middle-income countries: A cross-sectional analysis with 12,669 older adults
    Pedro Pugliesi Abdalla, Lucimere Bohn, Emerson Sebastião, André Pereira dos Santos, Marcio Fernando Tasinafo Junior, Leonardo Santos Lopes da Silva, Thiago Cândido Alves, Euripedes Barsanulfo Gonçalves Gomide, Ana Claudia Rossini Venturini, Jorge Mota, Da
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    Xueyi Miao, Lingyu Ding, Jinling Lu, Hanfei Zhu, Kang Zhao, Xinyi Xu, Shuqin Zhu, Li Chen, Jieman Hu, Qin Xu
    Journal of Geriatric Oncology.2023; 14(7): 101583.     CrossRef
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    Duanfang Cai, Hongli Zhang, Yilin Wang
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    Yuying Zhang, Weiqing Chen, Bing Cao, Li Lin, Jinghua Li, Vivian Yawei Guo
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    Minghui Weng, Jianlin Pu, Binyou Wang, Yilin Wang
    American Journal of Human Biology.2023;[Epub]     CrossRef
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    Yilin Wang, Mei Li, Xiaoyan Chen
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    Jihyun Baek, Yunmi Kim, Hyun-Young Kim
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Association Between Parental Marital Status and Types of Suicidal Behavior Among Korean Adolescents: A Cross-sectional Study
Yoon Sik Park, Eun-Cheol Park
J Prev Med Public Health. 2020;53(6):419-428.   Published online September 21, 2020
DOI: https://doi.org/10.3961/jpmph.20.004
  • 3,605 View
  • 175 Download
  • 3 Crossref
AbstractAbstract PDF
Objectives
Adolescent suicide is a global problem. This study aimed to identify associations between parental marital status and suicidal behavior.
Methods
This study analyzed 118 715 middle and high school students from the 13th and 14th Korea Youth Risk Behavior Web-based Survey. The odds ratios (ORs) of suicidal ideation, planning, and attempts were calculated based on parental marital status, living situation, and socioeconomic factors. The data were analyzed using multiple logistic regression.
Results
When compared to those living with 2 married biological parents, the ORs of suicidal ideation among adolescents living with either remarried or no parents were 1.34 (95% confidence interval [CI], 1.17 to 1.53) and 1.36 (95% CI, 1.11 to 1.66), respectively. For suicidal planning, the OR of those living with 1 remarried biological parent was 1.24 (95% CI, 1.01 to 1.52), and that of those living without parents was 1.28 (95% CI, 0.95 to 1.73), when compared to adolescents living with 2 married biological parents. For suicide attempts, when compared to adolescents with 2 married biological parents, the OR of those living with 1 remarried biological parent was 1.48 (95% CI, 1.17 to 1.87) and that of those living without parents was 2.02 (95% CI, 1.44 to 2.83). For adolescents living with 1 remarried biological parent, suicidal behavior was strongly associated with having no siblings and were weakly associated with not living with grandparents.
Conclusions
Suicidal behavior among adolescents was associated with the remarriage and loss of parents. Therefore, special attention and interventions are needed for adolescents in those situations.
Summary

Citations

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  • Family Functioning and Suicide Attempts in Mexican Adolescents
    Francisco Alejandro Ortiz-Sánchez, Aniel Jessica Leticia Brambila-Tapia, Luis Shigeo Cárdenas-Fujita, Christian Gabriel Toledo-Lozano, María Alejandra Samudio-Cruz, Benjamín Gómez-Díaz, Silvia García, Martha Eunice Rodríguez-Arellano, Edgar Oswaldo Zamora
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The Association Between the Basic Old-Age Pension and Depression of the Older Adults in Korea
Jaewon Kim, Tae-Jin Lee, Cheong-Seok Kim
J Prev Med Public Health. 2020;53(5):332-341.   Published online July 13, 2020
DOI: https://doi.org/10.3961/jpmph.20.024
  • 7,571 View
  • 217 Download
  • 2 Crossref
AbstractAbstract PDFSupplementary Material
Objectives
The purpose of this study was to investigate the association between the Basic Old-Age Pension (BOP), which is a noncontributory pension, and depression in BOP beneficiaries in Korea.
Methods
We used the second and third waves (2007-2008) of the Korea Welfare Panel Study to identify the effect of the BOP on mental health in the year of its introduction. The Center for Epidemiological Studies-Depression Scale, applied in a Korean context, was used to evaluate mental health. To analyze the effect of the BOP, a difference-in-difference approach was used in analyses of all subjects and subgroups.
Results
For this study population of 760 adults, the BOP did not have a statistically significant relationship with depression in its beneficiaries. After controlling for type of household, the BOP was still not associated with lower reporting of depression, either in singlebeneficiary or double-beneficiary households, in the year of the benefit.
Conclusions
The BOP policy had no significant relationship with the level of depression among recipients. However, this should not be interpreted as implying that income subsidy programs for older adults, such as the BOP, do not affect mental health, considering the importance of economic hardship in this population and the program’s socioeconomic effects.
Summary

Citations

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  • Factors Associated with Aging in Place among Community-Dwelling Older Adults in Korea: Findings from a National Survey
    Myong Sun Cho, Mi Young Kwon
    International Journal of Environmental Research and Public Health.2023; 20(3): 2740.     CrossRef
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    Chenhong Peng, Paul S. F. Yip
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Contextual and Individual Determinants of Mental Health: A Cross-sectional Multilevel Study in Tehran, Iran
Homeira Sajjadi, Gholamreza Ghaedamini Harouni, Hassan Rafiey, Mohammadreza Vaez-Mahdavi, Meroe Vameghi, Seyed Hossein Mohaqeqi Kamal
J Prev Med Public Health. 2020;53(3):189-197.   Published online April 14, 2020
DOI: https://doi.org/10.3961/jpmph.19.150
  • 3,400 View
  • 148 Download
  • 4 Crossref
AbstractAbstract PDF
Objectives
Our aim was to answer the following questions: (1) Can mental health variance be partitioned to individual and higher levels (e.g., neighborhood and district); (2) How much (as a percentage) do individual-level determinants explain the variability of mental health at the individual-level; and (3) How much do determinants at the neighborhood- or district-level explain the variability of mental health at the neighborhood- or district-level?
Methods
We used raw data from the second round of the Urban Health Equity Assessment and Response Tool in Tehran (in 2012-2013, n=34 700 samples nested in 368 neighborhoods nested in 22 districts) and the results of the official report of Tehran’s Center of Studies and Planning (in 2012-2013, n=22 districts). Multilevel linear regression models were used to answer the study questions.
Results
Approximately 40% of Tehran residents provided responses suggestive of having mental health disorders (30-52%). According to estimates of residual variance, 7% of mental health variance was determined to be at the neighborhood-level and 93% at the individual-level. Approximately 21% of mental health variance at the individual-level and 49% of the remaining mental health variance at the neighborhood-level were determined by determinants at the individual-level and neighborhood-level, respectively.
Conclusions
If we want to make the most effective decisions about the determinants of mental health, in addition to considering the therapeutic perspective, we should have a systemic or contextual view of the determinants of mental health.
Summary

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The Relationship Between Job Stress, Job Satisfaction, and the Symptom Checklist-90-Revision (SCL-90-R) in Marine Officers on Board
Jae Hee Kim, Soong-nang Jang
J Prev Med Public Health. 2016;49(6):376-385.   Published online September 12, 2016
DOI: https://doi.org/10.3961/jpmph.16.046
  • 11,765 View
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AbstractAbstract PDF
Objectives
This study was conducted to investigate the relationships among job stress, job satisfaction, and mental health in marine officers.
Methods
The researchers gathered data on marine officers working at a harbor in Chungcheong Province, South Korea, using a self-reported questionnaire. Mental health was measured by the Symptom Checklist-90-Revision (SCL-90-R), and general characteristics including socioeconomic factors, job stress, and job satisfaction were measured by structured questionnaires. Multiple regression analysis was performed to investigate the relationships among job stress, job satisfaction, and mental health status according to the symptom dimensions of the SCL-90-R.
Results
Among the marine officers, obsessive-compulsive behavior, depression, and somatization were the most problematic symptoms. Those who reported poor health, low job satisfaction, and high job stress had a higher prevalence of psychoticism, somatization, depression, anxiety, and phobic anxiety.
Conclusions
An occupational health system should be introduced that would regularly check the mental health of marine officers in charge of ships and sailors, in order to help reduce their stress levels, enhance their job satisfaction, and thereby improve their mental health.
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  • The impact of maritime service quality on employee satisfaction by seafarers rank: evidence from a global survey grounded on ERG theory
    Angelos Pantouvakis, Ilias Vlachos, Dionysios Polemis
    International Journal of Quality & Reliability Management.2024; 41(1): 107.     CrossRef
  • An AI-based Decision Support System for Predicting Mental Health Disorders
    Salih Tutun, Marina E. Johnson, Abdulaziz Ahmed, Abdullah Albizri, Sedat Irgil, Ilker Yesilkaya, Esma Nur Ucar, Tanalp Sengun, Antoine Harfouche
    Information Systems Frontiers.2023; 25(3): 1261.     CrossRef
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    Liming Quan, Lingyu Wu, Yang Zhang, Ting Chen, Yajia Lan
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    Yu Guo, Ran Yan, Yiwei Wu, Hans Wang
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    Samantha K. Brooks, Neil Greenberg
    BMC Psychology.2022;[Epub]     CrossRef
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    Man-Li Du, Wan-Xin Deng, Wen Sun, Ching-Wen Chien, Tao-Hsin Tung, Xin-Chun Zou
    Medicine.2020; 99(6): e19049.     CrossRef
  • Impact of Work–Family Conflict, Job Stress and Job Satisfaction on Seafarer Performance
    Ji An, Yun Liu, Yujie Sun, Chen Liu
    International Journal of Environmental Research and Public Health.2020; 17(7): 2191.     CrossRef
  • Minnesota Multiphasic Personality Inventory Characteristics of Korea Coast Guard Members According to Ship Working Period
    Hyun Ho Lee, Eun Ju Bae, Un Kyoung Ahn, Min Sun Kim, Kyeoung Min Kim, Myung Ho Lim
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  • Identifying Predictors of Stress and Job Satisfaction in a Sample of Merchant Seafarers Using Structural Equation Modeling
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    Xia Zhao, Menglian Wu, Dan Zhang, Yaoyao Sun, Yang Yang, Hui Xie, Yonggang Su, Jihui Jia, Shuhong Zhang
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    Kum Fai Yuen, Hui Shan Loh, Qingji Zhou, Yiik Diew Wong
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Determinants of Mental Health Care Utilization in a Suicide High-risk Group With Suicidal Ideation
Hyun-Soo Kim, Moo-Sik Lee, Jee-Young Hong
J Prev Med Public Health. 2016;49(1):69-78.   Published online January 22, 2016
DOI: https://doi.org/10.3961/jpmph.15.016
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AbstractAbstract PDF
Objectives
The suicide rate in Korea is increasing every year, and is the highest among the Organization for Economic Cooperation and Development countries. Psychiatric patients in particular have a higher risk of suicide than other patients. This study was performed to evaluate determinants of mental health care utilization among individuals at high risk for suicide.
Methods
Korea Health Panel data from 2009 to 2011 were used. Subjects were individuals at high risk of suicide who had suicidal ideation, a past history of psychiatric illness, or had utilized outpatient services for a psychiatric disorder associated with suicidal ideation within the past year. The chi-square test and hierarchical logistic regression were used to identify significant determinants of mental health care utilization.
Results
The total number of subjects with complete data on the variables in our model was 989. Individuals suffering from three or more chronic diseases used mental health care more frequently. Mental health care utilization was higher in subjects who had middle or high levels of educational attainment, were receiving Medical Aid, or had a large family size.
Conclusions
It is important to control risk factors in high-risk groups as part of suicide prevention strategies. The clinical approach, which includes community-based intervention, entails the management of reduction of suicidal risk. Our study identified demographic characteristics that have a significant impact on mental health care utilization and should be considered in the development of suicide prevention strategies. Further studies should examine the effect of mental health care utilization on reducing suicidal ideation.
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  • Predisposing, enabling and need factors associated with past-year health service use for mental health reasons in adults with suicidal ideation in France
    Helen-Maria Vasiliadis, Christophe Léon, Enguerrand du Roscoät, Mathilde M. Husky
    Journal of Affective Disorders.2022; 319: 62.     CrossRef
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    Juan-Luis Muñoz-Sánchez, María Sánchez-Gómez, María Martín-Cilleros, Esther Parra-Vidales, Diego de Leo, Manuel Franco-Martín
    International Journal of Environmental Research and Public Health.2018; 15(10): 2117.     CrossRef
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    Mina Kim, Young-Hoon Lee, Soraya Seedat
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A Study of Mental Health Literacy Among North Korean Refugees in South Korea
Jin-Won Noh, Young Dae Kwon, Sieun Yu, Hyunchun Park, Jong-Min Woo
J Prev Med Public Health. 2015;48(1):62-71.   Published online January 16, 2015
DOI: https://doi.org/10.3961/jpmph.14.040
  • 11,244 View
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AbstractAbstract PDF
Objectives
This study aimed to investigate North Korean refugees’ knowledge of mental illnesses and treatments and analyze the factors affecting this knowledge.
Methods
Subjects were selected via a snowball sampling method, and the survey outcomes of 152 North Korean refugee participants were analyzed. The factors affecting knowledge of mental illnesses were analyzed via a regression analysis by constructing a multivariate model with mental illness knowledge score as the dependent variable.
Results
The North Korean refugees’ mental illness scores ranged from 3 to 24 points, with an average score of 13.0. Regarding the factors that influence mental illness knowledge, the subjects with South Korean spouses and those who had spent more time in South Korea had higher knowledge scores. Furthermore, the subjects who considered the mental health of North Korean refugees to be a serious issue revealed lower knowledge scores than those who did not believe it was a serious issue. The subjects who visit psychiatric clinics showed higher knowledge scores than those who do not. The South Korean subjects who had at least a college education exhibited higher scores than did those without advanced education. The subjects who are satisfied with life in South Korea manifested a higher mental illness knowledge score than those who are not.
Conclusions
This study is significant as being the first study to ever measure and evaluate the level of North Korean refugees’ knowledge of mental illnesses. In addition, the evaluations of North Korean refugees’ mental illness knowledge and influencing factors while residing in South Korea created basic data that formed the foundation of an effort to enhance mental health literacy and provide proper mental health services. The results of this study can be utilized to solve mental health problems that might frequently occur during the unification process of North and South Korea in the future.
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  • Üniversite öğrencilerinin ruh sağlığı okuryazarlık düzeyi: kesitsel bir çalışma
    Bediye ÖZTAŞ, Nursemin ÜNAL, Zeynep ÖLÇER, Ayşe ÇAL, Günay HAZİR
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Special Article
General Factors of the Korean Exposure Factors Handbook
Jae-Yeon Jang, So-Yeon Kim, Sun-Ja Kim, Kyung-Eun Lee, Hae-Kwan Cheong, Eun-Hye Kim, Kyung-Ho Choi, Young-Hee Kim
J Prev Med Public Health. 2014;47(1):7-17.   Published online January 29, 2014
DOI: https://doi.org/10.3961/jpmph.2014.47.1.7
  • 13,006 View
  • 138 Download
  • 26 Crossref
AbstractAbstract PDF

Risk assessment considers the situations and characteristics of the exposure environment and host. Various physiological variables of the human body reflects the characteristics of the population that can directly influence risk exposure. Therefore, identification of exposure factors based on the Korean population is required for appropriate risk assessment. It is expected that a handbook about general exposure factors will be used by professionals in many fields as well as the risk assessors of the health department. The process of developing the exposure factors handbook for the Korean population will be introduced in this article, with a specific focus on the general exposure factors including life expectancy, body weight, surface area, inhalation rates, amount of water intake, and soil ingestion targeting the Korean population. The researchers used national databases including the Life Table and the 2005 Time Use Survey from the National Statistical Office. The anthropometric study of size in Korea used the resources provided by the Korean Agency for Technology and Standards. In addition, direct measurement and questionnaire surveys of representative samples were performed to calculate the inhalation rate, drinking water intake, and soil ingestion.

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Original Article
Modifying Effect of Suicidal Ideation on the Relationship Between Asthma and Cigarette Use Behaviors Among Korean Adolescents
Jisuk Bae, Eun Young Park, Soon-Woo Park
J Prev Med Public Health. 2011;44(3):118-124.   Published online May 17, 2010
DOI: https://doi.org/10.3961/jpmph.2011.44.3.118
  • 7,847 View
  • 62 Download
  • 5 Crossref
AbstractAbstract PDF
Objectives

Although cigarette smoking is known to be related to the exacerbation of asthma symptoms, several studies have indicated that the prevalence of cigarette smoking among asthmatic adolescents is similar to or even higher than that among non-asthmatic adolescents. The aim of this study was to evaluate the relationship between asthma and cigarette use behaviors and whether or not the presence of suicidal ideation modifies this relationship among Korean adolescents.

Methods

We analyzed data from the 2008 Korea Youth Risk Behavior Web-based Survey, which included a nationally representative sample of middle and high school students. Multiple logistic regression models were used to calculate odd ratios and 95% confidence intervals of cigarette use behaviors among current asthmatics, former asthmatics, and non-asthmatics, after adjusting for gender, grade, school records, socioeconomic status, current alcohol use, and suicidal ideation.

Results

Of 75 238 study participants, 3.5% were current asthmatics and 4.5% were former asthmatics. Compared with non-asthmatics, asthmatics were more likely to report current cigarette use, frequent and heavy cigarette use, and cigarette use before 13 years of age. There were statistically significant interactions between asthma and suicidal ideation in cigarette use behaviors.

Conclusions

This study demonstrated that asthmatic adolescents are more likely than non-asthmatic adolescents to engage in cigarette use behaviors and the presence of suicidal ideation is an effect modifier of the relationship between asthma and cigarette use behaviors. Particular attention should be paid to the awareness of health risks of cigarette smoking and mental health problems among asthmatic adolescents.

Summary

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  • Asthme et comportements suicidaires chez les adolescents: revue systématique
    M. Underner, G. Peiffer, J. Perriot, I. De Chazeron, N. Jaafari
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JPMPH : Journal of Preventive Medicine and Public Health