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3 "Prenatal care"
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Original Article
Antenatal Care Services and Incidence of Low Birth Weight: A Comparison of Demographic and Health Surveys in 4 ASEAN Countries
Miftahul Arsyi, Besral Besral, Milla Herdayati, Revati Phalkey
J Prev Med Public Health. 2022;55(6):559-567.   Published online November 13, 2022
DOI: https://doi.org/10.3961/jpmph.22.316
  • 3,478 View
  • 168 Download
  • 3 Web of Science
  • 3 Crossref
AbstractAbstract PDFSupplementary Material
Objectives
This study aimed to assess the effect of complete coverage and content of available antenatal care (ANC) on the incidence of low birth weight (LBW) in 4 countries belonging to the Association of Southeast Asian Nations (ASEAN).
Methods
Measures of complete coverage and content of ANC services included the frequency of ANC visits and the seven service components (blood pressure measurement, iron supplementation, tetanus toxoid immunization, explanations of pregnancy complications, urine sample test, blood sample test, and weight measurement). The complete coverage and content of ANC services were assessed as high if more than 4 ANC visits and all seven components were delivered. Multivariable logistic regression with complex survey designs was conducted using Demographic Health Survey data from the 4 ASEAN countries in question from 2014 to 2017.
Results
The proportion of LBW infants was higher in the Philippines (13.8%) than in Indonesia (6.7%), Cambodia (6.7%), or Myanmar (7.5%). Poor ANC services were associated with a 1.30 times higher incidence of LBW than a high level of complete coverage and content of ANC services (adjusted odds ratio [aOR], 1.30; 95% confidence interval [CI], 1.11 to 1.52). In addition, the risk of LBW was higher in the Philippines than in other countries (aOR, 2.25; 95% CI, 2.01 to 2.51) after adjusting for mothers’ demographic/socioeconomic factors, health behaviors, and other factors.
Conclusions
In sum, complete coverage and content of ANC services were significantly associated with the incidence of LBW in Indonesia, Cambodia, and Myanmar. The Philippines did not show statistically significant results for this relationship, but had a higher risk of LBW with poor ANC.
Summary

Citations

Citations to this article as recorded by  
  • Synergistic associations of antenatal care visits and iron-folic acid supplementation with low birth weight: a pooled analysis of national surveys from six south Asian countries
    Vishnu Khanal, Sangita Bista, Shiva Raj Mishra
    BMC Public Health.2024;[Epub]     CrossRef
  • Effect of the enhancing nutrition and antenatal infection treatment (ENAT) intervention on birth weight in Ethiopia: a cluster randomized controlled trial
    Y Mekonnen, E Wolde, A Bekele, Z Mehari, S Abebe, T Hagos, Y Tadesse, T Taye, G Asire, T Nigatu, S Kumar, S Girma, M Salasibew
    BMC Pregnancy and Childbirth.2023;[Epub]     CrossRef
  • Compliance with the World Health Organization’s 2016 prenatal care contact recommendation reduces the incidence rate of adverse birth outcomes among pregnant women in northern Ghana
    Leticia Achangebe Akum, Eunice Amina Offei, Mary Rachael Kpordoxah, Daudi Yeboah, Abdul-Nasir Issah, Michael Boah, Sanjoy Kumer Dey
    PLOS ONE.2023; 18(6): e0285621.     CrossRef
Perspective
Group Antenatal Care: A Paradigm Shift to Explore for Positive Impacts in Resource-poor Settings
Bhanu Pratap Singh Gaur, Jyothi Vasudevan, Bhabani Pegu
J Prev Med Public Health. 2021;54(1):81-84.   Published online December 8, 2020
DOI: https://doi.org/10.3961/jpmph.20.349
  • 3,548 View
  • 130 Download
  • 3 Web of Science
  • 3 Crossref
AbstractAbstract PDF
The delivery of high-quality antenatal care is a perennial global concern for improving maternal and neonatal outcomes. Antenatal care is currently provided mainly on a one-to-one basis, but growing evidence has emerged to support the effectiveness of group antenatal care. Providing care in a small group gives expectant mothers the opportunity to have discussions with their peers about certain issues and concerns that are unique to them and to form a support system that will improve the quality and utilization of antenatal care services. The aim of this article is to promote group antenatal care as a means to increase utilization of healthcare.
Summary

Citations

Citations to this article as recorded by  
  • Improving health literacy through group antenatal care: results from a cluster randomized controlled trial in Ghana
    Jody R. Lori, Vida Ami Kukula, Liya Liu, Veronica E.A. Apetorgbor, Bidisha Ghosh, Elizabeth Awini, Nancy Lockhart, Georgina Amankwah, Ruth Zielinski, Cheryl A. Moyer, John Williams
    BMC Pregnancy and Childbirth.2024;[Epub]     CrossRef
  • Magnitude, disparity, and predictors of poor-quality antenatal care service: A systematic review and meta-analysis
    Dereje Bayissa Demissie, Gebeyaw Molla, Firew Tiruneh Tiyare, Abebe Sorsa Badacho, Ashenif Tadele
    SAGE Open Medicine.2024;[Epub]     CrossRef
  • Adolescents’ experiences with group antenatal care: Insights from a mixed‐methods study in Senegal
    Ashley Vandermorris, Britt McKinnon, Mohamadou Sall, Adrian Witol, Mahamadou Traoré, Fatma Lamesse‐Diedhiou, Diego G. Bassani
    Tropical Medicine & International Health.2021; 26(12): 1700.     CrossRef
Original Article
Prenatal care utilization pattern and its determinants in rural Korea.
Jang Rak Kim, Jung Han Park, Jae Kyong Lee, Sang Hong Seo, Joon Yong Bang
Korean J Prev Med. 1993;26(4):599-613.
  • 2,103 View
  • 25 Download
AbstractAbstract PDF
To study the pattern of prenatal care utilization and its determinants in rural Korea, 976 mothers(65.5%) out of 1,489 living mothers in Chinyang, Sachon and Hapchon Counties in Kyongsangnam Province who had delivered a baby between July 1, 1990 and June 30, 1991 were interviewed by the Myon health workers from January 3 through February 15, 1992. The Andersen's behavioral model for health service utilization was applied to develop the frames for analysis. The dependent variable was a number of prenatal care visits. And the independent variables included in the model were the variables pertaining to the predisposing, enabling, medical need and other components. The proportion of mother who had ever received the prenatal care service for the index pregnancy was 97.3%. However, the proportion of mothers who had made more than 10 visits was only 20.6%, which indicated that majority of mothers had paid far less visits than recommended 10~12 visits for each normal pregnancy. The low utilization of prenatal care services(none or less than 4 visits) was related to mother's low educational level, the high birth order, beneficiary of the medical aid, the absence of clinic in the community, no diagnosed disease of mother during pregnancy, and mothers engaged in farming. Inequity of access seemed to exist because social structure variables and the variables of enabling component were important predictors. And there seemed to be high mutability in equalizing the distribution of prenatal care services because the variables of enabling component such as type of medical security and whether there was a clinic or not in the community were substantially important.
Summary

JPMPH : Journal of Preventive Medicine and Public Health