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Original Articles
Validity of Self-reported Stroke and Myocardial Infarction in Korea: The Health Examinees (HEXA) Study
Sunho Choe, Joonki Lee, Jeeyoo Lee, Daehee Kang, Jong-Koo Lee, Aesun Shin
J Prev Med Public Health. 2019;52(6):377-383.   Published online November 12, 2019
DOI: https://doi.org/10.3961/jpmph.19.089
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  • 94 Download
  • 6 Crossref
AbstractAbstract PDF
Objectives
Self-reported disease history is often used in epidemiological studies. In this study, we acquired the hospital records of subjects who self-reported stroke or myocardial infarction (MI) and evaluated the validity of the participants’ self-reported disease history. We also determined the level of agreement between specialists and non-specialists.
Methods
Among the participants in the Health Examinees study, 1488 subjects self-reported stroke or MI during 2012-2017, and medical records were acquired for the 429 subjects (28.8%) who agreed to share their medical information. Each record was independently assigned to 2 medical doctors for review. The records were classified as ‘definite,’ ‘possible,’ or ‘not’ stroke or MI. If the doctors did not agree, a third doctor made the final decision. The positive predictive value (PPV) of self-reporting was calculated with the doctors’ review as the gold standard. Kappa statistics were used to compare the results between general doctors and neurologists or cardiologists.
Results
Medical records from 208 patients with self-reported stroke and 221 patients with self-reported MI were reviewed. The PPV of self-reported disease history was 51.4% for stroke and 32.6% for MI. If cases classified as ‘possible’ were counted as positive diagnoses, the PPV was 59.1% for stroke and 33.5% for MI. Kappa statistics showed moderate levels of agreement between specialists and non-specialists for both stroke and MI.
Conclusions
The validity of self-reported disease was lower than expected, especially in those who reported having been diagnosed with MI. Proper consideration is needed when using these self-reported data in further studies.
Summary

Citations

Citations to this article as recorded by  
  • Stressful life events and heart disease and stroke: A study among Portuguese older adults
    Ana Quaresma, Elisabete Alves, Silvia Fraga, Ana Henriques
    Stress and Health.2024;[Epub]     CrossRef
  • Validation of self-reported cardiovascular problems in childhood cancer survivors by contacting general practitioners: feasibility and results
    Eva-Maria Hau, Tomáš Sláma, Stefan Essig, Gisela Michel, Laura Wengenroth, Eva Bergstraesser, Nicolas X. von der Weid, Christina Schindera, Claudia E. Kuehni
    BMC Primary Care.2024;[Epub]     CrossRef
  • Association of the amount of alcohol consumption with change in skeletal muscle and fat mass among Korean adults
    Jihun Song, Seulggie Choi, Sun Jae Park, Sung Min Kim, Yoosun Cho, Gyeongsil Lee, Ji Soo Kim, Sang Min Park
    Alcohol.2023; 111: 9.     CrossRef
  • History of Breastfeeding and Stroke Prevalence Among Parous Females: Findings from the National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey, 1999–2012
    Gina M. Richardson, Emily Mitchell, Kalera Stratton, Laura R. Kair, Lynn M. Marshall
    Breastfeeding Medicine.2022; 17(9): 768.     CrossRef
  • Joint effect of elevated-c-reactive protein level and hypertension on new-onset stroke: A nationwide prospective cohort study of CHARLS
    Xuanli Chen, Siyuan Liu, Jiadong Chu, Wei Hu, Na Sun, Yueping Shen
    Frontiers in Public Health.2022;[Epub]     CrossRef
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    Eun Young Lee, Jungsoon Choi, Sugie Lee, Bo Youl Choi
    International Journal of Environmental Research and Public Health.2021; 18(4): 1861.     CrossRef
What Explains Socioeconomic Inequality in Health-related Quality of Life in Iran? A Blinder-Oaxaca Decomposition
Satar Rezaei, Mohammad Hajizadeh, Yahya Salimi, Ghobad Moradi, Bijan Nouri
J Prev Med Public Health. 2018;51(5):219-226.   Published online August 7, 2018
DOI: https://doi.org/10.3961/jpmph.18.012
  • 6,261 View
  • 208 Download
  • 4 Crossref
AbstractAbstract PDF
Objectives
This study aimed to explain the health-related quality of life (HRQoL) gap between the poorest and the wealthiest quintiles in the capitals of Kermanshah and Kurdistan Provinces (Kermanshah and Sanandaj), in western Iran.
Methods
This was a cross-sectional study conducted among 1772 adults. Data on socio-demographic characteristics, socioeconomic status (SES), lifestyle factors, body mass index, and HRQoL of participants were collected using a self-administered questionnaire. The slope and relative indices of inequality (SII and RII, respectively) were employed to examine socioeconomic inequality in poor HRQoL. Blinder-Oaxaca (BO) decomposition was used to quantify the contribution of explanatory variables to the gap in the prevalence of poor HRQoL between the wealthiest and the poorest groups.
Results
The overall crude and age-adjusted prevalence of poor HRQoL among adults was 32.0 and 41.8%, respectively. The SII and RII indicated that poor HRQoL was mainly concentrated among individuals with lower SES. The absolute difference (%) in the prevalence of poor HRQoL between the highest and lowest SES groups was 28.4. The BO results indicated that 49.9% of the difference was explained by different distributions of age, smoking behavior, physical inactivity, chronic health conditions, and obesity between the highest and lowest SES groups, while the remaining half of the gap was explained by the response effect.
Conclusions
We observed a pro-rich distribution of poor HRQoL among adults in the capitals of Kermanshah and Kurdistan Provinces. Policies and strategies aimed at preventing and reducing smoking, physical inactivity, chronic health conditions, and obesity among the poor may reduce the gap in poor HRQoL between the highest and lowest SES groups in Iran.
Summary

Citations

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  • Why is there a gap in self-rated health among people with hypertension in Zambia? A decomposition of determinants and rural‒urban differences
    Chris Mweemba, Wilbroad Mutale, Felix Masiye, Peter Hangoma
    BMC Public Health.2024;[Epub]     CrossRef
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    Sulmaz Ghahramani, Maryam Hadipour, Payam Peymani, Sahar Ghahramani, KamranB Lankarani
    Journal of Education and Health Promotion.2023; 12(1): 287.     CrossRef
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    Valerie Gilbert T Ulep, Jhanna Uy, Lyle Daryll Casas
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    Rodrigo Severino, Manuel Espinoza, Báltica Cabieses
    International Journal for Equity in Health.2022;[Epub]     CrossRef
Exploratory Study of Dimensions of Health-related Quality of Life in the General Population of South Korea
Seon-Ha Kim, Min-Woo Jo, Minsu Ock, Sang-il Lee
J Prev Med Public Health. 2017;50(6):361-368.   Published online November 2, 2017
DOI: https://doi.org/10.3961/jpmph.16.076
  • 9,083 View
  • 229 Download
  • 11 Crossref
AbstractAbstract PDFSupplementary Material
Objectives
This study aimed to explore dimensions in addition to the 5 dimensions of the 5-level EQ-5D version (EQ-5D-5L) that could satisfactorily explain variation in health-related quality of life (HRQoL) in the general population of South Korea.
Methods
Domains related to HRQoL were searched through a review of existing HRQoL instruments. Among the 28 potential dimensions, the 5 dimensions of the EQ-5D-5L and 7 additional dimensions (vision, hearing, communication, cognitive function, social relationships, vitality, and sleep) were included. A representative sample of 600 subjects was selected for the survey, which was administered through face-to-face interviews. Subjects were asked to report problems in 12 health dimensions at 5 levels, as well as their self-rated health status using the EuroQol visual analogue scale (EQ-VAS) and a 5-point Likert scale. Among subjects who reported no problems for any of the parameters in the EQ-5D-5L, we analyzed the frequencies of problems in the additional dimensions. A linear regression model with the EQ-VAS as the dependent variable was performed to identify additional significant dimensions.
Results
Among respondents who reported full health on the EQ-5D-5L (n=365), 32% reported a problem for at least 1 additional dimension, and 14% reported worse than moderate self-rated health. Regression analysis revealed a R2 of 0.228 for the original EQ-5D-5L dimensions, 0.200 for the new dimensions, and 0.263 for the 12 dimensions together. Among the added dimensions, vitality and sleep were significantly associated with EQ-VAS scores.
Conclusions
This study identified significant dimensions for assessing self-rated health among members of the general public, in addition to the 5 dimensions of the EQ-5D-5L. These dimensions could be considered for inclusion in a new preference-based instrument or for developing a country-specific HRQoL instrument.
Summary

Citations

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    Zhuxin Mao, Jingzhi Fan, Fanni Rencz, Zhihao Yang, Nan Luo, Pei Wang
    BMJ Open.2024; 14(1): e081140.     CrossRef
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    Anna Nikl, Mathieu F. Janssen, Balázs Jenei, Valentin Brodszky, Fanni Rencz
    PharmacoEconomics.2024; 42(5): 583.     CrossRef
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    BMJ Open.2023; 13(1): e066445.     CrossRef
  • Influence of body shape on health-related quality of life in Korean adults: The mediating effect of self-rated health
    Eun Sil Her, Jung Kyu Park, Yun Kyoung Oh, Hsin-Yen Yen
    PLOS ONE.2023; 18(10): e0293286.     CrossRef
  • A Review of the Types and Characteristics of Healthy Life Expectancy and Methodological Issues
    Young-Eun Kim, Yoon-Sun Jung, Minsu Ock, Seok-Jun Yoon
    Journal of Preventive Medicine and Public Health.2022; 55(1): 1.     CrossRef
  • Meaning and Status of Health-related Quality of Life Recognized by Medical Professionals: a Qualitative Study
    Jeehee Pyo, Minsu Ock, Bohyun Park, Nam-eun Kim, Eun Jeong Choi, Hyesook Park, Hyeong Sik Ahn
    Journal of Korean Medical Science.2021;[Epub]     CrossRef
  • Methods Used to Identify, Test, and Assess Impact on Preferences of Bolt-Ons: A Systematic Review
    Alexandra J.L.M. Geraerds, Gouke J. Bonsel, Mathieu F. Janssen, Aureliano Paolo Finch, Suzanne Polinder, Juanita A. Haagsma
    Value in Health.2021; 24(6): 901.     CrossRef
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    Sonia Berrih-Aknin, Kristl G Claeys, Nancy Law, Renato Mantegazza, Hiroyuki Murai, Francesco Saccà, Sarah Dewilde, Mathieu F Janssen, Emma Bagshaw, Hara Kousoulakou, Mark Larkin, Jon Beauchamp, Trevor Leighton, Sandra Paci
    BMJ Open.2021; 11(7): e048198.     CrossRef
  • The Association between Alcohol Drinking Patterns and Health-Related Quality of Life in the Korean Adult Population: Effects of Misclassification Error on Estimation of Association
    Eun Sook Lee, Boyoung Kim
    International Journal of Environmental Research and Public Health.2020; 17(21): 7758.     CrossRef
  • Quality of life in patients receiving percutaneous coronary intervention and optimal medical therapy in Ho Chi Minh City, Vietnam
    Thao Thanh Nguyen, Quyen Gia To, Anh Do Nguyen, Tien The Nguyen, Van-Anh Ngoc Huynh, Kien Gia To
    MedPharmRes.2020; 4(4): 1.     CrossRef
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    Krittaphas Kangwanrattanakul, Wiraphol Phimarn
    Expert Review of Pharmacoeconomics & Outcomes Research.2019; 19(4): 431.     CrossRef
Level of Agreement and Factors Associated With Discrepancies Between Nationwide Medical History Questionnaires and Hospital Claims Data
Yeon-Yong Kim, Jong Heon Park, Hee-Jin Kang, Eun Joo Lee, Seongjun Ha, Soon-Ae Shin
J Prev Med Public Health. 2017;50(5):294-302.   Published online July 20, 2017
DOI: https://doi.org/10.3961/jpmph.17.024
  • 6,776 View
  • 177 Download
  • 13 Crossref
AbstractAbstract PDF
Objectives
The objectives of this study were to investigate the agreement between medical history questionnaire data and claims data and to identify the factors that were associated with discrepancies between these data types. Methods: Data from self-reported questionnaires that assessed an individual’s history of hypertension, diabetes mellitus, dyslipidemia, stroke, heart disease, and pulmonary tuberculosis were collected from a general health screening database for 2014. Data for these diseases were collected from a healthcare utilization claims database between 2009 and 2014. Overall agreement, sensitivity, specificity, and kappa values were calculated. Multiple logistic regression analysis was performed to identify factors associated with discrepancies and was adjusted for age, gender, insurance type, insurance contribution, residential area, and comorbidities. Results: Agreement was highest between questionnaire data and claims data based on primary codes up to 1 year before the completion of self-reported questionnaires and was lowest for claims data based on primary and secondary codes up to 5 years before the completion of self-reported questionnaires. When comparing data based on primary codes up to 1 year before the completion of self-reported questionnaires, the overall agreement, sensitivity, specificity, and kappa values ranged from 93.2 to 98.8%, 26.2 to 84.3%, 95.7 to 99.6%, and 0.09 to 0.78, respectively. Agreement was excellent for hypertension and diabetes, fair to good for stroke and heart disease, and poor for pulmonary tuberculosis and dyslipidemia. Women, younger individuals, and employed individuals were most likely to under-report disease. Conclusions: Detailed patient characteristics that had an impact on information bias were identified through the differing levels of agreement.
Summary

Citations

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    Deutsches Ärzteblatt international.2024;[Epub]     CrossRef
  • Immeasurable Time Bias in Self-controlled Designs: Case-crossover, Case-time-control, and Case-case-time-control Analyses
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    Drug Safety.2022; 45(10): 1057.     CrossRef
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Validation Studies
Validity of Expired Carbon Monoxide and Urine Cotinine Using Dipstick Method to Assess Smoking Status.
Su San Park, Ju Yul Lee, Sung Il Cho
J Prev Med Public Health. 2007;40(4):297-304.
DOI: https://doi.org/10.3961/jpmph.2007.40.4.297
  • 5,691 View
  • 53 Download
  • 14 Crossref
AbstractAbstract PDF
OBJECTIVES
We investigated the validity of the dipstick method (Mossman Associates Inc. USA) and the expired CO method to distinguish between smokers and nonsmokers. We also elucidated the related factors of the two methods. METHODS: This study included 244 smokers and 50 exsmokers, recruited from smoking cessation clinics at 4 local public health centers, who had quit for over 4 weeks. We calculated the sensitivity, specificity and Kappa coefficient of each method for validity. We obtained ROC curve, predictive value and agreement to determine the cutoff of expired air CO method. Finally, we elucidated the related factors and compared their effect powers using the standardized regression coefficient. RESULTS: The dipstick method showed a sensitivity of 92.6%, specificity of 96.0% and Kappa coefficient of 0.79. The best cutoff value to distinguish smokers was 5-6ppm. At 5 ppm, the expired CO method showed a sensitivity of 94.3%, specificity of 82.0% and Kappa coefficient of 0.73. And at 6 ppm, sensitivity, specificity and Kappa coefficient were 88.5%, 86.0% and 0.64, respectively. Therefore, the dipstick method had higher sensitivity and specificity than the expired CO method. The dipstick and expired CO methods were significantly increased with increasing smoking amount. With longer time since the last smoking, expired CO showed a rapid decrease after 4 hours, whereas the dipstick method showed relatively stable levels for more than 4 hours. CONCLUSIONS: The dipstick and expired CO methods were both good indicators for assessing smoking status. However, the former showed higher sensitivity and specificity and stable levels over longer hours after smoking, compared to the expired CO method.
Summary

Citations

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    Annals of Occupational and Environmental Medicine.2023;[Epub]     CrossRef
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    Young Hwan Cho, Hyoung Yong Kim, Jeom Kyu Lee, Seung Hyun Kim
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  • Short-Term Success Rates of Smoking Cessation Support Programs and Factors Predicting Smoking Relapse: Using Data from a Smoking Cessation Clinic in a Hospital
    Seung-Hyun Yu, Myeong-Jun Kim, Jin Jeon, Hoon-Ki Park, Hwan-Sik Hwang, Kye-Yeung Park
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English Abstract
Does Non-standard Work Affect Health?.
Il Ho Kim, Do myung Paek, Sung Il Cho
J Prev Med Public Health. 2005;38(3):337-344.
  • 2,103 View
  • 64 Download
AbstractAbstract PDF
OBJECTIVE
Job insecurity, such as non-standard work, is reported to have an adverse impact on health, regardless of health behaviors. The aim of this study was to examine the relationship between non-standard employment and health in Korea. METHODS: We analyzed a representative weighted sample, which consisted of 2, 112 men and 1, 237 women, aged 15-64, from the 1998 Korea National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey. Non-standard employment included part-time permanent, short time temporary and daily workers. Self-reported health was used as a health indicator. RESULTS: This study indicated that women were more likely to report poorer health than men with standard jobs. Of all employees, 20.3% were female manual workers. After adjusting for potential confounders, such as age, education, equivalent income, marital, social and selfreported economic status and health behavior factors, nonstandard employment was found to be significantly associated with poor health among female manual workers (OR, 1.86; 95% CI, 1.24 to 2.79). No significant association was found in other working groups. CONCLUSIONS: Among female manual workers, nonstandard employees reported significantly poorer health compared with standard workers. This result raises concern as there are increasing numbers of non-standard workers, particularly females.
Summary
Original Article
Agreement between Smoking Self-report and Urine Cotinine among Adolescents.
Ihn Sook Jeong, No Rai Park, Jinkyung Ham
J Prev Med Public Health. 2004;37(2):127-132.
  • 2,304 View
  • 45 Download
AbstractAbstract PDF
OBJECTIONS: Cotinine, the major metabolite of nicotine, is a useful marker of exposure to tobacco smoke and self-reporting of smoking status is thought not to be reliable. This study aimed to evaluate the agreement between the smoking self-report among adolescents and the urinary cotinine test. METHODS: The study subjects were 1226 middle and high school students in Hanam city, who were selected by stratified random sampling. The self-report about smoking behavior was compared with urine cotinine value measured with PBM AccuSignRfi Nicotine (Princeton BioMeditech Corporation, USA). The percentage agreement, kappa and 95% confidence interval (CI) were calculated. RESULTS: The overall percentage agreement was 88.6%, and those for boys, girls, middle school, general school and vocational school students were 87.3%, 90.1%, 93.7%, 85, 5%, 90.7%, and 78.4%, respectively. The overall kappa index was 0.46 (95% CI=0.39-0.54) for overall, and those for boys, girls, middle school, general school and vocational school students were 0.56 (95% CI=0.48-0.65), 0.20 (95% CI=0.07-0.32), 0.21 (95% CI=0.09-0.34), 0.55 (95% CI=0.47-0.64), 0.42 (95% CI=0.33-0.52), and 0.48 (95% CI=0.36-0.60), respectively. CONCLUSION: The percentage agreement was relatively high but the kappa values very low for girls, and middle school students. Though the prevalence bias can be influenced by these results, the selfreport was not a sufficient tool for the evaluation of adolescents' smoking status, especially in girls or middle school students.
Summary

JPMPH : Journal of Preventive Medicine and Public Health