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HOME > J Prev Med Public Health > Volume 37(2); 2004 > Article
Original Article Agreement between Smoking Self-report and Urine Cotinine among Adolescents.
Ihn Sook Jeong, No Rai Park, Jinkyung Ham
Journal of Preventive Medicine and Public Health 2004;37(2):127-132
DOI: https://doi.org/
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1Department of Nursing, College of Medicine, Pusan National University, Korea. jeongis@pusan.ac.k
2School of Public Health, Inje University, Korea.
3Hanam-city Public Health Center, Korea.

OBJECTIONS: Cotinine, the major metabolite of nicotine, is a useful marker of exposure to tobacco smoke and self-reporting of smoking status is thought not to be reliable. This study aimed to evaluate the agreement between the smoking self-report among adolescents and the urinary cotinine test. METHODS: The study subjects were 1226 middle and high school students in Hanam city, who were selected by stratified random sampling. The self-report about smoking behavior was compared with urine cotinine value measured with PBM AccuSignRfi Nicotine (Princeton BioMeditech Corporation, USA). The percentage agreement, kappa and 95% confidence interval (CI) were calculated. RESULTS: The overall percentage agreement was 88.6%, and those for boys, girls, middle school, general school and vocational school students were 87.3%, 90.1%, 93.7%, 85, 5%, 90.7%, and 78.4%, respectively. The overall kappa index was 0.46 (95% CI=0.39-0.54) for overall, and those for boys, girls, middle school, general school and vocational school students were 0.56 (95% CI=0.48-0.65), 0.20 (95% CI=0.07-0.32), 0.21 (95% CI=0.09-0.34), 0.55 (95% CI=0.47-0.64), 0.42 (95% CI=0.33-0.52), and 0.48 (95% CI=0.36-0.60), respectively. CONCLUSION: The percentage agreement was relatively high but the kappa values very low for girls, and middle school students. Though the prevalence bias can be influenced by these results, the selfreport was not a sufficient tool for the evaluation of adolescents' smoking status, especially in girls or middle school students.


JPMPH : Journal of Preventive Medicine and Public Health