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Volume 43(4); July 2010
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Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
The Korean Prediction Model for Adolescents' Future Smoking Intentions.
Sungkyu Lee, Ji Eun Yun, Ja Kyoung Lee, Il Soon Kim, Sun Ha Jee
J Prev Med Public Health. 2010;43(4):283-291.
DOI: https://doi.org/10.3961/jpmph.2010.43.4.283
  • 5,746 View
  • 88 Download
  • 20 Crossref
AbstractAbstract PDF
OBJECTIVES
The purpose of this study was to develop a prediction model for future smoking intention among Korean adolescents aged 13 to 15 in order to identify the high risk group exposed to future smoking. METHODS: The data was collected from a total of 5940 students who participated in a self-administrated questionnaire of a cross-sectional school-based survey, the 2004 Korea Global Youth Tobacco Survey. Chi-square tests and logistic regression analyses were carried out to identify the relevant determinants associated with intentions of adolescents' future smoking. Receiver Operation Characteristic (ROC) assessment was applied to evaluate the explanation level of the developed prediction model. RESULTS: 8.4% of male and 7.2% of female participants show their intentions of future smoking. Among non-smoking adolescents; who have past smoking experience [odds ratio (OR) 2.73; 95% confidence interval (CI) 1.92 - 3.88]; who have intentions of smoking when close friends offer a cigarette (OR 31.47; 95% CI = 21.50 - 46.05); and who have friends that are mostly smokers (OR 5.27; 95% CI = 2.85 - 9.74) are more likely to be smokers in the future. The prediction model developed from this study consists of five determinants; past smoking experience; parents smoking status; friends smoking status; ownership of a product with a cigarette brand logo; and intentions of smoking from close friends' cigarette offer. The area under the ROC curve was 0.8744 (95% CI=0.85 - 0.90) for current non-smokers. CONCLUSIONS: For efficiency, school-based smoking prevention programs need to be designed to target the high risk group exposed to future smoking through the prediction model developed by the study, instead of implementing the programs for all the students.
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Citations to this article as recorded by  
  • Electronic Cigarette Cessation in Youth and Young Adults: A Case Series
    Gautam Sikka, MopeninuJesu Oluyinka, Raiza Schreiber, Panagis Galiatsatos
    Tobacco Use Insights.2021; 14: 1179173X2110266.     CrossRef
  • A Comparative Analysis of Machine Learning Methods for Class Imbalance in a Smoking Cessation Intervention
    Khishigsuren Davagdorj, Jong Seol Lee, Van Huy Pham, Keun Ho Ryu
    Applied Sciences.2020; 10(9): 3307.     CrossRef
  • School-related factors affecting smoking intention among Korean middle school students
    Jin Suk Ra, Mi Sook Jung
    Applied Nursing Research.2018; 39: 34.     CrossRef
  • Subgrouping High School Students for Substance Abuse–Related Behaviors: A Latent Class Analysis
    Fariba Khayyati, Asghar Mohammadpoorasl, Hamid Allahverdipour, Mohammad AsghariJafarabadi, Kamiar Kouzekanani
    American Journal of Men's Health.2017; 11(4): 1200.     CrossRef
  • Socioeconomic Disparities in Smoking Behavior and Early Smoking Initiation Among Men in Malawi
    Sanni Yaya, Ghose Bishwajit, Vaibhav Shah, Michael Ekholuenetale
    Tobacco Use Insights.2017; 10: 1179173X1772629.     CrossRef
  • Association between Peer Cigarette Smoking and Electronic Cigarette Smoking among Adolescent Nonsmokers: A National Representative Survey
    Jun Hyun Hwang, Soon-Woo Park, Hajo Zeeb
    PLOS ONE.2016; 11(10): e0162557.     CrossRef
  • Factors Associated with Early Smoking Initiation among Korean Adolescents
    Eun Sun So, Ji Young Yeo
    Asian Nursing Research.2015; 9(2): 115.     CrossRef
  • Personality, Perceived Environment, and Behavior Systems Related to Future Smoking Intentions among Youths: An Application of Problem-Behavior Theory in Shanghai, China
    Yong Cai, Rui Li, Jingfen Zhu, Li Na, Yaping He, Pam Redmon, Yun Qiao, Jin Ma, Jacobus van Wouwe
    PLOS ONE.2015; 10(3): e0122276.     CrossRef
  • Risk Factors of Future Smoking Among Thai Youth
    Gyeongsil Lee, Joann Lee, Sungkyu Lee
    Asia Pacific Journal of Public Health.2015; 27(2): NP2602.     CrossRef
  • Influence of Experiences of Witnessing Tobacco Advertising and Preferences of Tobacco Companies' Social Responsibility on Current and Future Smoking Intentions in Adolescents
    Sung Rae Shin, Sun Hwa Shin, Bok Keun Lee, Jin Hee Yang
    Journal of Korean Academy of Community Health Nursing.2014; 25(1): 33.     CrossRef
  • Prevalence and Factors Associated with Smoking Intentions among Non-smoking and Smoking Adolescents in Kota Tinggi, Johor, Malaysia
    Lim Kuang Hock, Sumarni Mohamad Ghazali, Kee Chee Cheong, Lim Kuang Kuay, Lim Hui Li, Teh Chien Huey, Chan Ying Ying, Yeo Lay Yen, Fiona Goh Swee Ching, Khoo Yi Yi, Chong Zhuo Lin, Normala Ibrahim, Amal Nasir Mustafa
    Asian Pacific Journal of Cancer Prevention.2014; 15(10): 4359.     CrossRef
  • Influence of Smoker Image Perceived Cigarette Advertising on Intention of Adulthood Smoking Among Highschool Students
    Goo-Churl Jeong
    The Journal of the Korea Contents Association.2014; 14(12): 785.     CrossRef
  • Risk Factors for Smoking Behaviors Among Adolescents
    Sung Suk Chung, Kyoung Hwa Joung
    The Journal of School Nursing.2014; 30(4): 262.     CrossRef
  • Analysis of Smoking by South Korean Middle School Students: Shifting Preferences in Brand Choice and Rising Popularity of Marlboro Cigarettes
    Randy M. Page, Yarazeth Hernandez Romero
    International Quarterly of Community Health Education.2013; 33(3): 289.     CrossRef
  • Association between Exposures of Smoking Scenes in Movies and Smoking Behavior among Korean Adolescents
    김이경, 이향기, Sun Ha Jee, 이성규
    Health and Social Welfare Review.2013; 33(4): 497.     CrossRef
  • Cross‐Cultural Analysis of Cognitive Attributions of Smoking in Thai and South Korean Adolescents
    Randy M. Page, Sunhee Park, Jiraporn Suwanteerangkul, Hyunju Park, Maria Kemeny, Lynn Philips
    Journal of School Health.2012; 82(2): 57.     CrossRef
  • Smoking Trajectories among Koreans in Seoul and California: Exemplifying a Common Error in Age Parameterization
    Jon-Patrick Allem, John W. Ayers, Jennifer B. Unger, Veronica L. Irvin, C. Richard Hofstetter, Melbourne F. Hovell
    Asian Pacific Journal of Cancer Prevention.2012; 13(5): 1851.     CrossRef
  • Preventable Lifestyle Risk Factors for Non-Communicable Diseases in the Pakistan Adolescents Schools Study 1 (PASS-1)
    Ali Khan Khuwaja, Saleem Khawaja, Komal Motwani, Adeel Akbar Khoja, Iqbal Syed Azam, Zafar Fatmi, Badar Sabir Ali, Muhammad Masood Kadir
    Journal of Preventive Medicine and Public Health.2011; 44(5): 210.     CrossRef
  • Current health issues in Korean adolescents
    Chang Ho Hong
    Korean Journal of Pediatrics.2011; 54(10): 395.     CrossRef
  • Public Health Challenges of Electronic Cigarettes in South Korea
    Sungkyu Lee, Heejin Kimm, Ji Eun Yun, Sun Ha Jee
    Journal of Preventive Medicine and Public Health.2011; 44(6): 235.     CrossRef
Original Article
Factors Related to Perceived Life Satisfaction Among the Elderly in South Korea.
Minsoo Jung, Carles Muntaner, Mankyu Choi
J Prev Med Public Health. 2010;43(4):292-300.
DOI: https://doi.org/10.3961/jpmph.2010.43.4.292
  • 5,686 View
  • 86 Download
  • 21 Crossref
AbstractAbstract PDF
OBJECTIVES
This study attempted to explore the aging phenomena that now characterize much of Korean society, and assessed issues associated with the life satisfaction experienced during the process of aging. METHODS: By employing the National Survey on the State of Life and the Desire for Welfare of the Elderly, 2004 in South Korea this study attempted to identify the factors that determine subjective life satisfaction among the elderly. The data utilized herein consisted of 3278 elderly people aged 65 years or older, from 9308 households. RESULTS: The results of analysis from the final model after the introduction of 19 variables in 8 factors showed statistically similar explanatory power in men (adj. R2=0.320) and in women (adj. R2=0.346). We found that economic condition was the most influential factor in both men (B=0.278) and women (B=0.336) except perceived health condition variables. The second most influential variable in life satisfaction was health checkups in men (B=0.128) and degree of nutritional diet in women (B=0.145). Those who had experience with chronic diseases also reported significantly lower perceived life satisfaction and this was particularly true of women. CONCLUSIONS: The aging society requires an understanding of the lives of elderly individuals. This study explored factors associated with life satisfaction in old age by using a life satisfaction model. The success of an aging society begins with an accurate understanding of the elderly, and thus political attention will need to be focused on this matter.
Summary

Citations

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  • Functional disability and its associated factors among the elderly in rural India using LASI Wave 1 data
    Manik Halder, Jay Saha, Avijit Roy, Doli Roy, Pradip Chouhan
    Journal of Public Health.2024; 32(6): 1069.     CrossRef
  • Home- and Community-based Elderly Care and the Life Satisfaction of Chinese Elderly Individuals
    Aolong Liu, Yifan Ma, Kexin Qiu, Han Qiao, Huawei Zhao
    American Journal of Health Behavior.2024; 48(2): 116.     CrossRef
  • Living arrangement of Indian elderly: a predominant predictor of their level of life satisfaction
    Binayak Kandapan, Jalandhar Pradhan, Itishree Pradhan
    BMC Geriatrics.2023;[Epub]     CrossRef
  • Older Adults’ Advance Aging and Life Satisfaction Levels: Effects of Lifestyles and Health Capabilities
    Dongwook Cho, Wookwang Cheon
    Behavioral Sciences.2023; 13(4): 293.     CrossRef
  • An assessment of self-rated life satisfaction and its correlates with physical, mental and social health status among older adults in India
    Mahadev Bramhankar, Sampurna Kundu, Mohit Pandey, Nand Lal Mishra, Adarsh Adarsh
    Scientific Reports.2023;[Epub]     CrossRef
  • Trade Unions and Workers’ Life Satisfaction in South Korea
    Yong-Woo Lee
    Applied Research in Quality of Life.2022; 17(1): 277.     CrossRef
  • The effects of health insurance and physical exercise participation on life satisfaction of older people in China—Based on CHNS panel data from 2006 to 2015
    Lin Luo, Xiaojin Zeng, Xiangfei Wang
    Frontiers in Public Health.2022;[Epub]     CrossRef
  • Satisfaction with life and associated factors among elderly people living in two cities in northwest Ethiopia: a community-based cross-sectional study
    Habtamu Sewunet Mekonnen, Helena Lindgren, Biftu Geda, Telake Azale, Kerstin Erlandsson
    BMJ Open.2022; 12(9): e061931.     CrossRef
  • Influence of healthy lifestyle behaviors on life satisfaction in the aging population of Thailand: a national population-based survey
    Sirinya Phulkerd, Sasinee Thapsuwan, Aphichat Chamratrithirong, Rossarin Soottipong Gray
    BMC Public Health.2021;[Epub]     CrossRef
  • Functional Capacity and Life Satisfaction in Older Adult Residents Living in Long-Term Care Facilities: The Mediator of Autonomy
    Li-Hsing LIU, Chia-Chan KAO, Jeremy C. YING
    Journal of Nursing Research.2020; 28(4): e102.     CrossRef
  • The Association between the Perception of Aging and Functional Independence in the Elderly Patients with Type II Diabetes Mellitus
    F Bastani, P Beigi Boroujeni
    Iran Journal of Nursing.2019; 32(117): 7.     CrossRef
  • Frequency and Pattern of Contact with Multiple Children and Subjective Well-Being in Middle and Later Life
    Heejeong Choi, Boram Nam
    Journal of Korean Home Management Association.2019; 37(4): 27.     CrossRef
  • Patterns in quality of life according to employment among the older adults: the Korean longitudinal study of aging (2008–2014)
    Deulle Min, Eunhee Cho
    BMC Public Health.2018;[Epub]     CrossRef
  • The Association Between Filial Discrepancy and Depressive Symptoms: Findings From a Community-Dwelling Chinese Aging Population
    Xinqi Dong, Mengting Li, Yingxiao Hua
    The Journals of Gerontology: Series A.2017; 72(suppl_1): S63.     CrossRef
  • Factors determining the use of social support services among elderly people living in a city environment in Poland
    Monika Burzynska, Marek Bryla, Pawel Bryla, Irena Maniecka-Bryla
    Health & Social Care in the Community.2016; 24(6): 758.     CrossRef
  • Old, down and out? Appearance, body work and positive ageing among elderly South Korean women
    Joanna Elfving-Hwang
    Journal of Aging Studies.2016; 38: 6.     CrossRef
  • Common chronic health problems and life satisfaction among Macau elderly people
    Sydney X.X. Hu, Wai In Lei, Ka Kei Chao, Brian J. Hall, Siu Fung Chung
    International Journal of Nursing Sciences.2016; 3(4): 367.     CrossRef
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    Chengbo Li, Iris Chi, Xu Zhang, Zhaowen Cheng, Lei Zhang, Gong Chen
    Aging & Mental Health.2015; 19(10): 947.     CrossRef
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    Pallavi Banjare, Rinshu Dwivedi, Jalandhar Pradhan
    Health and Quality of Life Outcomes.2015;[Epub]     CrossRef
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    Eun-Kyoung Othelia Lee, Jungui Lee
    Educational Gerontology.2013; 39(7): 514.     CrossRef
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    Heejin Kimm, Jae Woong Sull, Bayasgalan Gombojav, Sang-Wook Yi, Heechoul Ohrr
    BMC Public Health.2012;[Epub]     CrossRef
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Assessment of Di (2-ethylhexyl) Phthalate Exposure by Urinary Metabolites as a Function of Sampling Time.
Moon Seo Park, Yun Jung Yang, Yeon Pyo Hong, Sang Yon Kim, Yong Pil Lee
J Prev Med Public Health. 2010;43(4):301-308.
DOI: https://doi.org/10.3961/jpmph.2010.43.4.301
  • 5,342 View
  • 97 Download
  • 12 Crossref
AbstractAbstract PDF
OBJECTIVES
In most DEHP exposure assessment studies, single spot urine sample was used. It could not compare the exposure level among studies. Therefore, we are going to represent the necessity of selection of proper sampling time of spot urine for assessing the environmental DEHP exposure, and the association urinary DEHP metabolites with steroid hormones. METHODS: We collected urine and plasma from 25 men. The urine sampling times were at the end of the shift (post-shift) and the next morning before the beginning of the shift (pre-shift). Three metabolites of DEHP {mono(2-ethylhexyl) phthalate [MEHP], mono-(2-ethyl-5-hydroxyhexyl)phthalate [MEHHP], and mono(2-ethyl-5-oxohexyl)phthalate [MEOHP]} in urine were analyzed by HPLC/MS/MS. Plasma luteinzing hormone, follicle stimulating hormone, testosterone, and 17beta-estradiol were measured at pre-shift using a ELISA kit. A log-transformed creatinine-adjusted urinary MEHP, MEHHP, and MEOHP concentration were compared between the post- and pre-shift. The Pearson's correlation was calculated to assess the relationships between log-transformed urinary MEHP concentrations in pre-shift urine and hormone levels. RESULTS: The three urinary metabolite concentrations at post-shift were significantly higher than the concentrations in the pre-shift (p<0.0001). The plasma hormones were not significantly correlated with log-transformed creatinine - adjusted DEHP metabolites. CONCLUSIONS: To assess the environmental DEHP exposure, it is necessary to select the urine sampling time according to the study object. There were no correlation between the concentration of urinary DEHP metabolites and serum hormone levels.
Summary

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  • A Study of the Relationship between Phthalate Exposure and the Occurrence of Adult Asthma in Taiwan
    Tsai-Hui Duh, Chih-Jen Yang, Chien-Hung Lee, Ying-Chin Ko
    Molecules.2023; 28(13): 5230.     CrossRef
  • Effect of the phthalates exposure on sex steroid hormones in the US population
    Yuan-duo Zhu, Xu Han, Xin-qi Wang, Tan-xi Ge, Hang Liu, Lin Fan, Li Li, Li-qin Su, Xian-liang Wang
    Ecotoxicology and Environmental Safety.2022; 231: 113203.     CrossRef
  • The Impairment of Thyroid Hormones Homeostasis after Short-Term Exposure to Di(2-ethylhexyl)phthalate in Adolescent Male Rats
    Sang-Yon Kim, Yeon-Pyo Hong, Yun-Jung Yang
    Development & Reproduction.2021; 25(4): 293.     CrossRef
  • Biomonitoring of occupational exposure to phthalates: A systematic review
    Nadine Fréry, Tiina Santonen, Simo P. Porras, Aleksandra Fucic, Veruscka Leso, Radia Bousoumah, Radu Corneliu Duca, Mounia El Yamani, Marike Kolossa-Gehring, Sophie Ndaw, Susana Viegas, Ivo Iavicoli
    International Journal of Hygiene and Environmental Health.2020; 229: 113548.     CrossRef
  • Phthalate exposure and male reproductive outcomes: A systematic review of the human epidemiological evidence
    Elizabeth G. Radke, Joseph M. Braun, John D. Meeker, Glinda S. Cooper
    Environment International.2018; 121: 764.     CrossRef
  • Impact of Di-2-Ethylhexyl Phthalate Metabolites on Male Reproductive Function: a Systematic Review of Human Evidence
    Birgit Bjerre Høyer, Virissa Lenters, Aleksander Giwercman, Bo A.G. Jönsson, Gunnar Toft, Karin S. Hougaard, Jens Peter E. Bonde, Ina Olmer Specht
    Current Environmental Health Reports.2018; 5(1): 20.     CrossRef
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    Christiane Scheffler, Melanie Dammhahn
    American Journal of Human Biology.2017;[Epub]     CrossRef
  • Serum Phthalate Levels and Time to Pregnancy in Couples from Greenland, Poland and Ukraine
    Ina Olmer Specht, Jens Peter Bonde, Gunnar Toft, Christian H. Lindh, Bo A. G. Jönsson, Kristian T. Jørgensen, Jodi Pawluski
    PLOS ONE.2015; 10(3): e0120070.     CrossRef
  • Associations between serum phthalates and biomarkers of reproductive function in 589 adult men
    Ina Olmer Specht, Gunnar Toft, Karin S. Hougaard, Christian H. Lindh, Virissa Lenters, Bo A.G. Jönsson, Dick Heederik, Aleksander Giwercman, Jens Peter E. Bonde
    Environment International.2014; 66: 146.     CrossRef
  • Di(2‐ethylhexyl) phthalate metabolites as markers for blood transfusion in doping control: Intra‐individual variability of urinary concentrations
    E. Solymos, S. Guddat, H. Geyer, A. Thomas, M. Thevis, W. Schänzer
    Drug Testing and Analysis.2011; 3(11-12): 892.     CrossRef
  • Rapid determination of urinary di(2-ethylhexyl) phthalate metabolites based on liquid chromatography/tandem mass spectrometry as a marker for blood transfusion in sports drug testing
    E. Solymos, S. Guddat, H. Geyer, U. Flenker, A. Thomas, J. Segura, R. Ventura, P. Platen, M. Schulte-Mattler, M. Thevis, W. Schänzer
    Analytical and Bioanalytical Chemistry.2011; 401(2): 517.     CrossRef
  • An estimate of phthalate exposure among term pregnant women living in Bucheon: The pilot study
    Tae-Hee Kim, Yeon-pyo Hong, Hae-Hyeog Lee, Soo-Ho Chung, Yun-jung Yang, Sang-yon Kim, Young Lim Kho, Jun-Mo Kim
    Korean Journal of Obstetrics.2011; 54(3): 140.     CrossRef
English Abstracts
Associated Factors of Impaired Fasting Glucose in Some Korean Rural Adults.
Hye Eun Yun, Mi Ah Han, Ki Soon Kim, Jong Park, Myeng Guen Kang, So Yeon Ryu
J Prev Med Public Health. 2010;43(4):309-318.
DOI: https://doi.org/10.3961/jpmph.2010.43.4.309
  • 4,190 View
  • 40 Download
  • 1 Crossref
AbstractAbstract PDF
OBJECTIVES
This study was performed to investigate the prevalence of impaired fasting glucose (IFG) and its related characteristics among healthy adults in some Korean rural areas. METHODS: We conducted a cross-sectional study using the data from 1352 adults who were over the age 40 and under the age 70 and who were free of diabetes mellitus (DM), cardiovascular diseases and other diseases and who participated in a survey conducted as part of the Korean Rural Genomic Cohort Study. IFG was defined as a serum fasting glucose level between 100 and 125 mg/dL. RESULTS: The prevalence of IFG was 20.4% in men, 15.5% in women and 12.7% overall. Multivariate logistic regression analysis demonstrated that the independent risk factors for IFG were male gender, having a family history of DM, the quartiles of gamma glutamyltransferase and high sensitive C-reactive protein and the waist circumference. The homeostatis model assessment for insulin resistance was very strongly associated with IFG. The prevalence of metabolic syndrome (MS) and MS components was higher in the subjects with IFG then in those with normal fasting glucose (NFG). CONCLUSIONS: The result of study could supply evidence to find the high risk population and to determine a strategy for treating IFG. Further research is needed to explain the causal relationship and mechanisms of IFG.
Summary

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  • Classification of Type 2 Diabetes Incidence Risk and the Health Behavior of the 30–50-Year-Old Korean Adults: Latent Class Analysis
    Roma Seol, Jin-Ho Chun
    International Journal of Environmental Research and Public Health.2022; 19(24): 16600.     CrossRef
Relationship Between Status of Physical and Mental Function and Quality of Life Among the Elderly People Admitted from Long-Term Care Insurance.
Hyeong Seon Kim, Nam Kyou Bae, In Sun Kwon, Young Chae Cho
J Prev Med Public Health. 2010;43(4):319-329.
DOI: https://doi.org/10.3961/jpmph.2010.43.4.319
  • 5,512 View
  • 105 Download
  • 9 Crossref
AbstractAbstract PDF
OBJECTIVES
This study was performed to determine the levels of quality of life (QOL) according to the grade of long-term care service for the elderly people who were admitted from long-term care insurance, and to reveal its association with the physical and mental functioning such as the Activity of Daily Living (ADL), the Instrumental Activity of Daily Living (IADL), the Center for Epidemiologic Studies Depression Scale (CES-D), and the Mini-Mental State Examination-Korean version (MMSE-K). METHODS: The interviews were performed during the period from March 1 to May 31, 2009, for 958 elderly people in urban and rural areas. The questionnaire items included various indices such as the ADL, IADL, CES-D, and MMSE-K, as independent variables and the index of QOL, as the dependent ones. For statistical analysis, t-tests were used for the mean scores of QOL according to gender and the grade of long-term care services, and Spearman's correlation was used for each variable. The effects of physical and mental functioning for QOL were assessed by covariance structure analysis. The statistical significance was set at p<0.05. RESULTS: The mean scores of QOL among all the subjects was 55.4 +/- 15.62 (Grade I: 49.7 +/- 14.17, Grade II: 56.8 +/- 14.62, Grade III: 59.4+/-16.36), and it was lower according to the higher grade of long-term care insurance. In terms of the correlation matrix of the QOL and the physical and mental function factors, the QOL showed positive correlation with the ADL, IADL and MMSE-K, while it had negative correlation with depression. On the analysis of covariance, mental functioning (depression and the MMSE-K) had a greater influence on the level of QOL than the physical functioning (ADL and IADL). CONCLUSIONS: The level of the QOL in the elderly people who were admitted from long-term care insurance was lower according to higher the grade of long-term care insurance. Also, the mental functioning (depression and MMSE-K) was more influential on the level of the QOL than the physical functioning (ADL and IADL).
Summary

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  • Physical Therapy Assessment Tool Threshold Values to Identify Sarcopenia and Locomotive Syndrome in the Elderly
    Hae-In Kim, Myung-Chul Kim
    International Journal of Environmental Research and Public Health.2023; 20(12): 6098.     CrossRef
  • The paradox of aging and health-related quality of life in Asian Chinese: results from the Healthy Aging Longitudinal Study in Taiwan
    Han-Yun Tseng, Corinna Löckenhoff, Chun-Yi Lee, Shu-Han Yu, I-Chien Wu, Hsing-Yi Chang, Yen-Feng Chiu, Chao Agnes Hsiung
    BMC Geriatrics.2020;[Epub]     CrossRef
  • Physical Function(ADL, IADL) and Related Factors in the Elderly People Institutionalized in Long-term Care Facilities
    Kwon-Suk Ahn, Sung-Kyeong Park, Young-Chae Cho
    Journal of the Korea Academia-Industrial cooperation Society.2016; 17(3): 480.     CrossRef
  • Correlates of depressive symptoms in urban middle-aged and elderly Lithuanians
    Laura Sapranaviciute-Zabazlajeva, Regina Reklaitiene, Abdonas Tamosiunas, Migle Baceviciene, Dalia Virviciute, Anne Peasey
    Social Psychiatry and Psychiatric Epidemiology.2014; 49(8): 1199.     CrossRef
  • Physical Functioning and Related Factors in the Elderly People Admitted Long-term Home Care Insurance
    Seok-Han Yoon, Kwang-Sung Lee, Young-Chae Cho
    Journal of the Korea Academia-Industrial cooperation Society.2013; 14(5): 2338.     CrossRef
  • Validity of Motor Impairment Scale in Long-Term Care Insurance System of Korea
    Yeo Hyung Kim, Chan Hyuk Kwon, Hyung Ik Shin
    Annals of Rehabilitation Medicine.2013; 37(3): 403.     CrossRef
  • Comparison of Comprehensive Health Status and Health-related Quality of Life between Institutionalized Older Adults and Community Dwelling Older Adults
    Hye-Jin Hyun, Aekyung Chang, Su Jeong Yu, Yeon-Hwan Park
    Journal of Korean Academy of Community Health Nursing.2012; 23(1): 40.     CrossRef
  • Cardiovascular risk factors and cognitive function in middle aged and elderly Lithuanian urban population: results from the HAPIEE study
    Abdonas Tamosiunas, Migle Baceviciene, Regina Reklaitiene, Ricardas Radisauskas, Kristina Jureniene, Adelina Azaraviciene, Dalia Luksiene, Vilija Malinauskiene, Evelina Daugeliene, Laura Sapranaviciute-Zabazlajeva
    BMC Neurology.2012;[Epub]     CrossRef
  • Status of Physical and Mental Function and, Its Related Factors Among the Elderly People Using from Long-Term Care Insurance Service
    Nam-Kyou Bae, Young-Soo Song, Eun-Sook Shin, Young-Chae Cho
    Journal of the Korea Academia-Industrial cooperation Society.2012; 13(12): 5976.     CrossRef
Association Between Socioeconomic Status and All-Cause Mortality After Breast Cancer Surgery: Nationwide Retrospective Cohort Study.
Mi Jin Park, Woojin Chung, Sunmi Lee, Jong Hyock Park, Hoo Sun Chang
J Prev Med Public Health. 2010;43(4):330-340.
DOI: https://doi.org/10.3961/jpmph.2010.43.4.330
  • 5,420 View
  • 66 Download
  • 8 Crossref
AbstractAbstract PDF
OBJECTIVES
This study aims to evaluate and explain the socioeconomic inequalities of all-cause mortality after breast cancer surgery in South Korea. METHODS: This population based study included all 8868 females who underwent radical mastectomy for breast cancer between January 2002 and June 2003. Follow-up for mortality continued from January 2002 to June 2006. The patients were divided into 4 socioeconomic classes according to their socioeconomic status as defined by the National Health Insurance contribution rate. The relationship between socioeconomic status and all-cause mortality after breast cancer surgery was assessed using the Cox proportional hazards model with adjusting for age, the Charlson's index score, emergency hospitalization, the type of hospital and the hospital ownership. RESULTS: Those in the lowest socioeconomic status group had a significantly higher hazard ratio of 2.09 (95% CI =1.50 - 2.91) compared with those in the highest socioeconomic group after controlling for all the identifiable confounding variables. For all-cause mortality after radical mastectomy, all the other income groups showed significantly higher 3-year mortality rates than did the highest income group. CONCLUSIONS: The socioeconomic status of breast cancer patients should be considered as an independent prognostic factor that affects all-cause mortality after radical mastectomy, and this is possibly due to a delayed diagnosis, limited access or minimal treatment leading to higher mortality. This study may provide tangible support to intensify surveillance and treatment for breast cancer among low socioeconomic class women.
Summary

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Estimating the Socioeconomic Costs of Alcohol Drinking Among Adolescents in Korea.
Jaeyeun Kim, Woojin Chung, Sunmi Lee, Chongyon Park
J Prev Med Public Health. 2010;43(4):341-351.
DOI: https://doi.org/10.3961/jpmph.2010.43.4.341
  • 5,815 View
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AbstractAbstract PDF
OBJECTIVES
The purpose of this study was to estimate the socioeconomic costs resulting from alcohol drinking among adolescents as of 2006 from a societal perspective. METHODS: The costs were classified into direct costs, indirect costs, and other costs. The direct costs consisted of direct medical costs and direct non-medical costs. The indirect costs were computed by future income losses from premature death, productivity losses from using medical services and reduction of productivity from drinking and hangover. The other costs consisted of property damage, public administrative expenses, and traffic accident compensation. RESULTS: The socioeconomic costs of alcohol drinking among adolescents as of 2006 were estimated to be 387.5 billion won (0.05% of GDP). In the case of the former, the amount included 48.25% for reduction of productivity from drinking and hangover, 39.38% for future income losses from premature death, and 6.71% for hangover costs. CONCLUSIONS: The results showed that the socioeconomic costs of alcohol drinking among adolescents in Korea were a serious as compared with that of the United States. Therefore, the active interventions such as a surveillance system and a prevention program to control adolescents drinking by government and preventive medicine specialist are needed.
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    Aniceto Echalico Braza, Jinsoo Jason Kim, Sun Hee Kim
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  • Impact of Public Health Policies on Alcohol‐Associated Liver Disease in Latin America: An Ecological Multinational Study
    Luis Antonio Díaz, Francisco Idalsoaga, Eduardo Fuentes‐López, Andrea Márquez‐Lomas, Carolina A. Ramírez, Juan Pablo Roblero, Roberta C. Araujo, Fátima Higuera‐de‐la‐Tijera, Luis Guillermo Toro, Galo Pazmiño, Pedro Montes, Nelia Hernandez, Manuel Mendizab
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    Minji Han, Binh Thang Tran, Heeyoun Cho, Jin-Kyoung Oh
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Socioeconomic Costs of Food-Borne Disease Using the Cost-of-Illness Model: Applying the QALY Method.
Hosung Shin, Suehyung Lee, Jong Soo Kim, Jinsuk Kim, Kyu Hong Han
J Prev Med Public Health. 2010;43(4):352-361.
DOI: https://doi.org/10.3961/jpmph.2010.43.4.352
  • 5,476 View
  • 126 Download
  • 20 Crossref
AbstractAbstract PDF
OBJECTIVES
This study estimated the annual socioeconomic costs of food-borne disease in 2008 from a societal perspective and using a cost-of-illness method. METHODS: Our model employed a comprehensive set of diagnostic disease codes to define food-borne diseases with using the Korea National Health Insurance (KNHI) reimbursement data. This study classified the food borne illness as three types of symptoms according to the severity of the illness: mild, moderate, severe. In addition to the traditional method of assessing the cost-of-illness, the study included measures to account for the lost quality of life. We estimated the cost of the lost quality of life using quality-adjusted life years and a visual analog scale. The direct cost included medical and medication costs, and the non-medical costs included transportation costs, caregiver's cost and administration costs. The lost productivity costs included lost workdays due to illness and lost earnings due to premature death. RESULTS: The study found the estimated annual socioeconomic costs of food-borne disease in 2008 were 954.9 billion won (735.3 billion won-996.9 billion won). The medical cost was 73.4 - 76.8% of the cost, the lost productivity cost was 22.6% and the cost of the lost quality of life was 26.0%. CONCLUSIONS: Most of the cost-of-illness studies are known to have underestimated the actual socioeconomic costs of the subjects, and these studies excluded many important social costs, such as the value of pain, suffering and functional disability. The study addressed the uncertainty related to estimating the socioeconomic costs of food-borne disease as well as the updated cost estimates. Our estimates could contribute to develop and evaluate policies for food-borne disease.
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Suggestions for Increasing Physical Activity Levels of Korean Older Adults: A Public Health Perspective.
Seung Youn Hong
J Prev Med Public Health. 2010;43(4):362-365.
DOI: https://doi.org/10.3961/jpmph.2010.43.4.362
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AbstractAbstract PDF
2010 is the year when the Korean baby boomer generation faces retirement. With the need for affective strategies to keep this population healthy, the government has placed much effort to increase the regular physical activity (PA) level of older adults. Yet the prevalence of active seniors is still relatively low. This paper reviews the recent government strategies and efforts to enhance the physical activity levels of older adults and the PA programs provided in the community settings by major organizations and institutions. In addition, the problems of the current approaches are shown, and based on a review, the author provides five suggestions for promoting the PA level of older adults as follows. First, specific physical activity goals and objectives for older adults should be included in the National Health Plan 2020. Second, the recommendations for PA for seniors, which include a proper intensity, duration and frequency of exercise, should be provided. Third, the role of organizations and institutions should be rearranged for the proper dissemination of government provided community-based exercise programs. Fourth, a standard quality-control system should be provided, and finally, an evidence-based exercise program, which should be specifically created for the older Korean population, should be developed. Physical activity offers opportunities for people to extend the years of their active independent life and reduce functional limitations. To maximize the effects of government efforts to promote PA for seniors, we feel the comments provided in this paper should be closely examined.
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    Yunhwan Lee, Joung Hwan Back, Jinhee Kim, Haewon Byeon, Seihee Kim, Mikyung Ryu
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Editorial
Association Between Green Tea Consumption and Lung Cancer Risk.
Andy H Lee, Wenbin Liang, Fumi Hirayama, Colin W Binns
J Prev Med Public Health. 2010;43(4):366-367.
DOI: https://doi.org/10.3961/jpmph.2010.43.4.366
  • 5,165 View
  • 72 Download
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AbstractAbstract PDF
Green tea is a popular beverage and its health benefits are well known. However, inconsistent results have been reported in observational studies concerning the association between green tea consumption and the lung cancer risk. In this commentary, several methodological issues underlying the measurement of tea exposure are highlighted. The recommendations should be useful for designing and planning prospective cohort studies to ascertain the protective effect of green tea against lung cancer.
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    Jieming Lu, Ye Lin, Junfei Jiang, Lei Gao, Zhimin Shen, Changping Yang, Pinghua Lin, Mingqiang Kang
    Frontiers in Nutrition.2024;[Epub]     CrossRef
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    Masood Sadiq Butt, Rabia Shabir Ahmad, M. Tauseef Sultan, Mir M. Nasir Qayyum, Ambreen Naz
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JPMPH : Journal of Preventive Medicine and Public Health