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Volume 46(6); November 2013
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Original Articles
The Economic Burden of Epilepsy in Korea, 2010
Jaehun Jung, Hye-Young Seo, Young Ae Kim, In-Hwan Oh, Yo Han Lee, Seok-Jun Yoon
J Prev Med Public Health. 2013;46(6):293-299.   Published online November 28, 2013
DOI: https://doi.org/10.3961/jpmph.2013.46.6.293
  • 9,747 View
  • 126 Download
  • 10 Crossref
AbstractAbstract PDF
Objectives

The purposes of this study were to evaluate the prevalence of epilepsy and to estimate the cost of epilepsy in Korea, 2010.

Methods

This study used a prevalence based approach to calculate the cost of epilepsy. Claims data from the Korean national health insurance and data from the Korea health panel, the Korea National Statistical Office's records of causes of death, and labor statistics were used to estimate the cost of epilepsy. Patients were defined as those who were hospitalized or visited an outpatient clinic during 2010 with a diagnosis of epilepsy (International Classification of Diseases 10th revision codes G40-G41). Total costs of epilepsy included direct medical costs, direct non-medical cost and indirect costs.

Results

The annual prevalence of treated epilepsy was 228 per 100 000 population, and higher in men. The age-specific prevalence was highest for teenagers. The total economic burden of epilepsy was 536 billion Korean won (KW). Indirect cost (304 billion KW) was 1.3 times greater than direct cost (232 billion KW). By gender, the male (347 billion KW) were more burdened than the female (189 billion KW). The estimated cost in young age younger than 20 years old was 24.5% of the total burden of epilepsy.

Conclusions

A significant portion of the economic burden of epilepsy is borne by people in young age. To reduce the economic burden of epilepsy, effective prevention and treatment strategies are needed.

Summary

Citations

Citations to this article as recorded by  
  • Evaluation of persistence and healthcare utilization in patients treated with anti-seizure medications as add-on therapy: A nationwide cohort study in South Korea
    Ji Woong Lee, Jung-Ae Kim, Min Young Kim, Sang Kun Lee
    Epilepsy & Behavior.2022; 126: 108459.     CrossRef
  • Cost of Illness of Epilepsy and Associated Factors in Patients Attending Adult Outpatient Department of University of Gondar Referral Hospital, Northwest Ethiopia
    Piniel Melkamu, Yaregal Animut, Amare Minyihun, Asmamaw Atnafu, Mezgebu Yitayal
    Risk Management and Healthcare Policy.2021; Volume 14: 2385.     CrossRef
  • Cost–benefit analysis, cost-effectiveness analysis, and impact of antiepileptic drugs on the risk of fracture in patients with epilepsy: A nationwide cohort study
    Hsin-Hsuan Cheng, Pei-Tseng Kung, Bo-Ren Wang, Li-Ting Chiu, Wen-Chen Tsai
    Epilepsy & Behavior.2020; 103: 106851.     CrossRef
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    EunJin Ahn
    Korean Journal of Anesthesiology.2020; 73(3): 205.     CrossRef
  • Epilepsy in Asia: Disease burden, management barriers, and challenges
    Eugen Trinka, Patrick Kwan, ByungIn Lee, Amitabh Dash
    Epilepsia.2019; 60(S1): 7.     CrossRef
  • The Present and Future of Vagus Nerve Stimulation
    Jeyul Yang, Ji Hoon Phi
    Journal of Korean Neurosurgical Society.2019; 62(3): 344.     CrossRef
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    Freya Diederich, Hans-Helmut König, Claudia Mietzner, Christian Brettschneider
    Neurology.2018; 90(1): 28.     CrossRef
  • The Economic Burden of Hepatitis A, B, and C in South Korea
    Changwoo Shon, Hyung-Yun Choi, Jae-Jun Shim, So-Youn Park, Kyung Suk Lee, Seok-Jun Yoon, In-Hwan Oh
    Japanese Journal of Infectious Diseases.2016; 69(1): 18.     CrossRef
  • A nationwide epidemiological study of newly diagnosed spine metastasis in the adult Korean population
    Seil Sohn, Jinhee Kim, Chun Kee Chung, Na Rae Lee, Eunjung Park, Ung-Kyu Chang, Moon Jun Sohn, Sung Hwan Kim
    The Spine Journal.2016; 16(8): 937.     CrossRef
  • The direct costs of epilepsy in Russia. A prospective cost-of-illness study from a single center in Moscow
    Alla Guekht, Maria Mizinova, Igor Kaimovsky, Oksana Danilenko, Elisa Bianchi, Ettore Beghi
    Epilepsy & Behavior.2016; 64: 122.     CrossRef
Determinants of Health Care Expenditures and the Contribution of Associated Factors: 16 Cities and Provinces in Korea, 2003-2010
Kimyoung Han, Minho Cho, Kihong Chun
J Prev Med Public Health. 2013;46(6):300-308.   Published online November 28, 2013
DOI: https://doi.org/10.3961/jpmph.2013.46.6.300
  • 10,795 View
  • 119 Download
  • 19 Crossref
AbstractAbstract PDF
Objectives

The purpose of this study was to classify determinants of cost increases into two categories, negotiable factors and non-negotiable factors, in order to identify the determinants of health care expenditure increases and to clarify the contribution of associated factors selected based on a literature review.

Methods

The data in this analysis was from the statistical yearbooks of National Health Insurance Service, the Economic Index from Statistics Korea and regional statistical yearbooks. The unit of analysis was the annual growth rate of variables of 16 cities and provinces from 2003 to 2010. First, multiple regression was used to identify the determinants of health care expenditures. We then used hierarchical multiple regression to calculate the contribution of associated factors. The changes of coefficients (R2) of predictors, which were entered into this analysis step by step based on the empirical evidence of the investigator could explain the contribution of predictors to increased medical cost.

Results

Health spending was mainly associated with the proportion of the elderly population, but the Medicare Economic Index (MEI) showed an inverse association. The contribution of predictors was as follows: the proportion of elderly in the population (22.4%), gross domestic product (GDP) per capita (4.5%), MEI (-12%), and other predictors (less than 1%).

Conclusions

As Baby Boomers enter retirement, an increasing proportion of the population aged 65 and over and the GDP will continue to increase, thus accelerating the inflation of health care expenditures and precipitating a crisis in the health insurance system. Policy makers should consider providing comprehensive health services by an accountable care organization to achieve cost savings while ensuring high-quality care.

Summary

Citations

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    Dilek Atılgan, Enver Günay
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    Min Kyung Hyun
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  • Towards Actualizing the Value Potential of Korea Health Insurance Review and Assessment (HIRA) Data as a Resource for Health Research: Strengths, Limitations, Applications, and Strategies for Optimal Use of HIRA Data
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    Kyung‐Rae Hyun, Sungwook Kang, Sunmi Lee
    Health Economics.2016; 25(10): 1239.     CrossRef
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    M. Santric-Milicevic, V. Vasic, Z. Terzic-Supic
    Human Resources for Health.2016;[Epub]     CrossRef
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Cancer Incidence in Korean Vietnam Veterans During 1992-2003: The Korean Veterans Health Study
Sang-Wook Yi
J Prev Med Public Health. 2013;46(6):309-318.   Published online November 28, 2013
DOI: https://doi.org/10.3961/jpmph.2013.46.6.309
  • 20,640 View
  • 144 Download
  • 21 Crossref
AbstractAbstract PDF
Objectives

The aim of this study was to investigate the association between Vietnam experience including exposure to military herbicides and cancer incidence in Korean Vietnam War veterans.

Methods

The cancer cases of 185 265 Vietnam veterans from January 1, 1992 to December 31, 2003 were confirmed from the Korea National Cancer Incidence Database. The age-adjusted incidence and standardized incidence ratios (SIRs) were calculated using the male population during 1992 to 2003 as a standard population.

Results

The age-adjusted overall cancer incidence per 100 000 person-years was 455.3 in Vietnam veterans. The overall cancer incidence was slightly yet significantly lower in veterans (SIR, 0.97; 95% confidence interval, 0.95 to 0.99) than in the general population. The overall cancer incidence in enlisted soldiers was not lower (SIR, 1.00), whereas that in officers was significantly lower (SIR, 0.87) than in the general population. The incidences of prostate cancer and T-cell lymphoma in all veterans, and lung cancer and bladder cancer in enlisted soldiers, and colon cancer and kidney cancer in non-commissioned officers, and colon cancer, kidney cancer, and prostate cancer in officers, were higher than in the general population. The SIR for overall cancer among Vietnam veterans rose from 0.92 for 1992-1997 to 0.99 for 1998-2003.

Conclusions

The overall cancer incidence in Vietnam veterans was not higher than in the general male population. Vietnam veterans and military rank subcohorts experienced a higher incidence of several cancers, including prostate cancer, T-cell lymphoma, lung cancer, bladder cancer, kidney cancer, and colon cancer than the general population. The SIR for overall cancer increased over time in Vietnam veterans.

Summary

Citations

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Cardiovascular Health Metrics and All-cause and Cardiovascular Disease Mortality Among Middle-aged Men in Korea: The Seoul Male Cohort Study
Ji Young Kim, Young-Jin Ko, Chul Woo Rhee, Byung-Joo Park, Dong-Hyun Kim, Jong-Myon Bae, Myung-Hee Shin, Moo-Song Lee, Zhong Min Li, Yoon-Ok Ahn
J Prev Med Public Health. 2013;46(6):319-328.   Published online November 28, 2013
DOI: https://doi.org/10.3961/jpmph.2013.46.6.319
  • 14,925 View
  • 158 Download
  • 52 Crossref
AbstractAbstract PDF
Objectives

This study estimated the association of cardiovascular health behaviors with the risk of all-cause and cardiovascular disease (CVD) mortality in middle-aged men in Korea.

Methods

In total, 12 538 men aged 40 to 59 years were enrolled in 1993 and followed up through 2011. Cardiovascular health metrics defined the following lifestyle behaviors proposed by the American Heart Association: smoking, physical activity, body mass index, diet habit score, total cholesterol, blood pressure, and fasting blood glucose. The cardiovascular health metrics score was calculated as a single categorical variable, by assigning 1 point to each ideal healthy behavior. A Cox proportional hazards regression model was used to estimate the hazard ratio of cardiovascular health behavior. Population attributable risks (PARs) were calculated from the significant cardiovascular health metrics.

Results

There were 1054 total and 171 CVD deaths over 230 690 person-years of follow-up. The prevalence of meeting all 7 cardiovascular health metrics was 0.67%. Current smoking, elevated blood pressure, and high fasting blood glucose were significantly associated with all-cause and CVD mortality. The adjusted PARs for the 3 significant metrics combined were 35.2% (95% confidence interval [CI], 21.7 to 47.4) and 52.8% (95% CI, 22.0 to 74.0) for all-cause and CVD mortality, respectively. The adjusted hazard ratios of the groups with a 6-7 vs. 0-2 cardiovascular health metrics score were 0.42 (95% CI, 0.31 to 0.59) for all-cause mortality and 0.10 (95% CI, 0.03 to 0.29) for CVD mortality.

Conclusions

Among cardiovascular health behaviors, not smoking, normal blood pressure, and recommended fasting blood glucose levels were associated with reduced risks of all-cause and CVD mortality. Meeting a greater number of cardiovascular health metrics was associated with a lower risk of all-cause and CVD mortality.

Summary

Citations

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Relationship Between Current Sleep Duration and Past Suicidal Ideation or Attempt Among Korean Adolescents
Sung-In Jang, Kwang-Sig Lee, Eun-Cheol Park
J Prev Med Public Health. 2013;46(6):329-335.   Published online November 28, 2013
DOI: https://doi.org/10.3961/jpmph.2013.46.6.329
  • 10,273 View
  • 100 Download
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AbstractAbstract PDF
Objectives

To comprehensively examine the relationship between current sleep duration and past suicidal idea or attempt among Korean adolescents.

Methods

Data came from the 2009 Korea Youth Risk Behavior Web-based Survey with 75 066 participants (with the participation rate of 97.6%) in 800 middle and high schools. Binary logistic regression was conducted by gender and depressed mood to identify significant factors for suicidal ideation/attempt. The dependent variable was the log odds of suicidal ideation/attempt, while the independent/control variables were sleep duration and other demographic, socio-economic and health-related factors.

Results

A negative association between sleep duration and suicidal ideation or attempt was weaker for those with depressed mood than for those without such experience in Korea for Year 2009. The odds ratio of suicidal ideation/attempt regarding less than 4 hours of sleep compared to 6 to 7 hours of sleep, was smaller in a group with depressed mood than in a group without such experience, for example, 1.64 (95% confidence interval [CI], 1.29 to 2.08) vs. 2.06 (95% CI, 1.34 to 3.17) for men's suicidal ideation, 2.50 (95% CI, 1.69 to 3.69) vs. 3.89 (95% CI, 1.74 to 8.66) for men's suicidal attempt. A negative association between age (or self-rated health) and suicidal ideation/attempt was also weaker for those with depressed mood than for those without such experience in the nation for the year.

Conclusions

There was a negative association between sleep duration and suicidal ideation/attempt in Korea for Year 2009 and this association was weaker for those with depressed mood than for those without such experience. Based on the findings of this study, adolescents' better mental health and longer, more comfortable sleep might help to prevent their suicidal ideation and attempt in Korea.

Summary

Citations

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Social Network Characteristics and Body Mass Index in an Elderly Korean Population
Won Joon Lee, Yoosik Youm, Yumie Rhee, Yeong-Ran Park, Sang Hui Chu, Hyeon Chang Kim
J Prev Med Public Health. 2013;46(6):336-345.   Published online November 28, 2013
DOI: https://doi.org/10.3961/jpmph.2013.46.6.336
  • 10,253 View
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AbstractAbstract PDF
Objectives

Research has shown that obesity appears to spread through social ties. However, the association between other characteristics of social networks and obesity is unclear. This study aimed to identify the association between social network characteristics and body mass index (BMI, kg/m2) in an elderly Korean population.

Methods

This cross-sectional study analyzed data from 657 Koreans (273 men, 384 women) aged 60 years or older who participated in the Korean Social Life, Health, and Aging Project. Network size is a count of the number of friends. Density of communication network is the number of connections in the social network reported as a fraction of the total links possible in the personal (ego-centric) network. Average frequency of communication (or meeting) measures how often network members communicate (or meet) each other. The association of each social network measure with BMI was investigated by multiple linear regression analysis.

Results

After adjusting for potential confounders, the men with lower density (<0.71) and higher network size (4-6) had the higher BMI (β=1.089, p=0.037) compared to the men with higher density (>0.83) and lower size (1-2), but not in the women (p=0.393). The lowest tertile of communication frequency was associated with higher BMI in the women (β=0.885, p=0.049), but not in the men (p=0.140).

Conclusions

Our study suggests that social network structure (network size and density) and activation (communication frequency and meeting frequency) are associated with obesity among the elderly. There may also be gender differences in this association.

Summary

Citations

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Association of Selected Medical Conditions With Breast Cancer Risk in Korea
Sun Jae Jung, Minkyo Song, Ji-Yeob Choi, Nan Song, Sue Kyung Park, Keun-Young Yoo, Daehee Kang
J Prev Med Public Health. 2013;46(6):346-352.   Published online November 28, 2013
DOI: https://doi.org/10.3961/jpmph.2013.46.6.346
  • 9,955 View
  • 94 Download
  • 12 Crossref
AbstractAbstract PDF
Objectives

To estimate the effect of medical conditions in the population of Korea on breast cancer risk in a case-control study.

Methods

The cases were 3242 women with incident, histologically confirmed breast cancer in two major hospitals interviewed between 2001 and 2007. The controls were 1818 women each admitted to either of those two hospitals for a variety of non-neoplastic conditions. Information on each disease was obtained from a standardized questionnaire by trained personnel. Odds ratios (ORs) for each disease were derived from multiple logistic regression adjusted for age, age of menarche, pregnancy, age of first pregnancy, and family history of breast cancer.

Results

Among all of the incident breast cancer patients, pre-existing diabetes (OR, 1.33; 95% confidence interval [CI], 0.99 to 1.78), hypertension (OR, 1.46; 95% CI, 1.18 to 1.83), thyroid diseases (OR, 1.26; 95% CI, 1.00 to 1.58), and ovarian diseases (OR, 1.70; 95% CI, 1.23 to 2.35) were associated with an increased risk of breast cancer when other factors were adjusted for. In a stratified analysis by menopausal status, pre-existing hypertension (pre-menopause OR, 0.80; 95% CI, 0.48 to 1.34 vs. post-menopause OR, 1.87; 95% CI, 1.44 to 2.43; p-heterogeneity <0.01) and ovarian disease (pre-menopause OR, 4.20; 95% CI, 1.91 to 9.24 vs. post-menopause OR, 1.39; 95% CI, 1.02 to 1.91; p-heterogeneity 0.01) showed significantly different risks of breast cancer.

Conclusions

Our results suggest the possibility that medical conditions such as hypertension affect breast cancer development, and that this can differ by menopausal status. Our study also indicates a possible correlation between ovarian diseases and breast cancer risk.

Summary

Citations

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A Trend Analysis of the Prevalence, Awareness, Treatment, and Control of Hypertension by Age Group
Jong Youn Moon, Kwan Jun Park, Young Hwangbo, Mee Ri Lee, Byoung In Yoo, Jong Hye Won, Yoon Hyung Park
J Prev Med Public Health. 2013;46(6):353-359.   Published online November 28, 2013
DOI: https://doi.org/10.3961/jpmph.2013.46.6.353
  • 11,476 View
  • 112 Download
  • 24 Crossref
AbstractAbstract PDF
Objectives

We examined the trends in prevalence, awareness, treatment, and control of hypertension in Korea as a basis for improving hypertension control programs.

Methods

12 598 participants of the Korean National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey were included in this study. Weighted linear regression to test time trends from 2007 to 2011 was performed.

Results

The prevalence of hypertension was 20.7% in 2007, 29.4% in 2009, and 26.2% in 2011. Awareness of hypertension was 64.8% in 2007 and 61.1% in 2011. Awareness in those aged 65 and over was greater than in younger groups (age 19 to 44 and 45 to 64; p<0.001). The treatment rates were 58.4% in 2007 and 56.8% in 2011. The treatment rate was greater for those 65 and over than for younger age groups (p<0.001). The percentage of controlled hypertension was 37.6% in 2011. The percentage of controlled hypertension in those 65 and over was higher than in younger age groups (p<0.001). The treatment-control rates were 65.9% in 2007 and 67.7% in 2011. The prevalence of hypertension was higher in the males (p<0.001), while the awareness (p<0.001), treatment (p<0.001), and control (p<0.001) rates were higher in the females.

Conclusions

The prevalence of hypertension was increasing and the hypertension awareness, treatment, and control rates were low in younger age groups and males.

Summary

Citations

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JPMPH : Journal of Preventive Medicine and Public Health