Skip Navigation
Skip to contents

JPMPH : Journal of Preventive Medicine and Public Health

OPEN ACCESS
SEARCH
Search

Search

Page Path
HOME > Search
22 "Attitude"
Filter
Filter
Article category
Keywords
Publication year
Authors
Funded articles
Original Articles
Knowledge, Attitudes, and Practices Regarding Dengue Prevention Among Health Volunteers in an Urban Area – Malang, Indonesia
Alidha Nur Rakhmani, Lilik Zuhriyah
J Prev Med Public Health. 2024;57(2):176-184.   Published online February 21, 2024
DOI: https://doi.org/10.3961/jpmph.23.484
  • 1,324 View
  • 93 Download
AbstractAbstract AbstractSummary PDF
Objectives
The dengue prevention program known as “One House One Mosquito Larva Inspector” involves health volunteers who play a crucial role in the surveillance of mosquito larvae and reporting their findings to local public health officials. This study aimed to identify factors related to the knowledge, attitudes, and practices (KAP) of dengue prevention behavior among these health volunteers.
Methods
A study was conducted in 5 sub-districts in Malang, an urban area in Indonesia. We employed a cross-sectional design and utilized a semi-structured questionnaire to assess the KAP of 400 health volunteers. Data were collected through face-to-face interviews.
Results
Multiple logistic regression analysis revealed that individuals with a more positive attitude (odds ratio [OR], 1.69; p<0.05) and those with family sizes greater than five persons (OR, 1.90; p<0.05) were more likely to engage in effective dengue prevention practices. Additionally, possesing good knowledge was significantly assocated with more positive attitude (OR, 2.24; p<0.001). Furthermore, 40% reduction in positive attitude was observed in those over 45 years (OR, 0.60; p<0.05). The best practices most frequently reported by the majority of respondents included always reporting their surveillance activities (75.8%) and cleaning the water container in the bathroom at least once a week (65.2%). However, only 52.2% of respondents regularly checked for mosquito larvae in their neighborhood.
Conclusions
Sustainable promotion and training for the “One House One Mosquito Larva Inspector” initiative are necessary, particularly among young health volunteers, to improve dengue prevention behaviors both within their own homes and in the surrounding environment.
Summary
Key Message
The study among health volunteers emphasizes that better knowledge and younger age < 45 were associated with a positive attitude. While a positive attitude and family size > 5 persons were associated with better dengue prevention practices. Therefore, there is a need for sustained promotion and training among health volunteers to enhance the knowledge and attitude that may shape good dengue prevention practices.
Teachers’ Negative Attitudes and Limited Health Literacy Levels as Risks for Low Awareness of Epilepsy in Turkey
Gulay Yilmazel
J Prev Med Public Health. 2023;56(6):573-582.   Published online November 13, 2023
DOI: https://doi.org/10.3961/jpmph.23.330
  • 1,147 View
  • 58 Download
AbstractAbstract AbstractSummary PDFSupplementary Material
Objectives
For students with epilepsy, schools are a critical environment for managing the disease properly. This study examined awareness of epilepsy, attitudes toward epilepsy, and health literacy among school teachers in Turkey.
Methods
This study was conducted in a city in Turkey with 1408 public school teachers from June 2021 to September 2021.
Results
The median scores of the scales were 5, 29, and 32 for epilepsy awareness, epilepsy attitudes, and health literacy, respectively. Epilepsy awareness was higher in women, and epilepsy attitudes were more positive in women than men (p<0.05). While epilepsy awareness was higher in primary school teachers, epilepsy attitudes were more positive in secondary school teachers (p<0.05). Epilepsy awareness was lower in secondary school teachers (odds ratio [OR], 1.27; p<0.05), those who did not have an individual with epilepsy in their family/social environment (OR, 1.57; p<0.001), those who did not have a student with epilepsy in their class (OR, 1.45; p<0.05), and in those who had not witnessed an epilepsy seizure (OR,1.19; p<0.05). Compared to those with positive attitudes regarding epilepsy, epilepsy awareness was 1.36 times lower in those with negative attitudes (p<0.001). Epilepsy awareness was 1.92 times lower in those with limited health literacy than those with adequate health literacy (p<0.001).
Conclusions
In this study, low epilepsy awareness, negative epilepsy attitudes, and limited health literacy were common among teachers. The findings from this study suggest that panels, workshops, and health training on epilepsy should be organized for school teachers and included at regular intervals in certified first-aid practices.
Summary
Key Message
• This article examined school teachers' barriers to epilepsy awareness. • Awareness was low, negative attitudes were high, and health literacy level was limited. • Negative attitudes and limited health literacy were the most effective risks for poor awareness.
Healthcare Workers’ Knowledge and Attitudes Regarding the World Health Organization’s “My 5 Moments for Hand Hygiene”: Evidence From a Vietnamese Central General Hospital
Huy Van Nguyen, Hieu Trung Tran, Long Quynh Khuong, Thanh Van Nguyen, Na Thi Nhi Ho, An Thi Minh Dao, Minh Van Hoang
J Prev Med Public Health. 2020;53(4):236-244.   Published online May 7, 2020
DOI: https://doi.org/10.3961/jpmph.19.319
  • 9,286 View
  • 253 Download
  • 3 Crossref
AbstractAbstract PDF
Objectives
Although the World Health Organization (WHO) initiative “My 5 Moments for Hand Hygiene” has been lauded as effective in preventing hospital-associated infections, little is known about healthcare workers (HCWs)’ hand hygiene behavior. In this study, we sought to assess knowledge and attitudes towards the concepts in this initiative, as well as associated factors, among Vietnamese HCWs at a general hospital.
Methods
A structured questionnaire was administered to HCWs at a central Vietnamese general hospital in 2015. Multiple logistic regression analysis was used to identify factors associated with HCWs’ knowledge and attitudes towards hand hygiene.
Results
Of 120 respondents, 65.8% and 67.5% demonstrated appropriate knowledge and a positive attitude, respectively, regarding all 5 hand hygiene moments. Logistic regression indicated better knowledge of hand hygiene in workers who were over 30 years old, who were direct HCWs (rather than managers), who had frequent access to clinical information, and who received their clinical information from training. Those who worked in infectious and tropical disease wards, who had frequent access to clinical information, and who received information from training were more likely to have a positive attitude towards hand hygiene than their counterparts.
Conclusions
Although many Vietnamese HCWs displayed moderate knowledge and positive attitudes towards the WHO hand hygiene guidelines, a key gap remained. Regular education and training programs are needed to increase knowledge and to improve attitudes and practices towards hand hygiene. Furthermore, a combination of multimodal strategies and locally-adapted interventions is needed for sustainable hand hygiene adherence.
Summary

Citations

Citations to this article as recorded by  
  • Improvement in knowledge and perception about the controlling of COVID-19: best practice of apothecary student
    Chynthia Pradiftha Sari, Suci Hanifah, Yulianto Yulianto, Dian Medisa, Zahrotun Nafiah, Muhammad Alfian Lutfi
    Journal of Advanced Pharmacy Education and Research.2023; 13(2): 6.     CrossRef
  • Hand Hygiene Knowledge and Perception Survey for Healthcare Workers in Government Hospitals (GHs) in Bahrain
    Saleh F Sowar, Rommel Acunin, Harold C Cabanalan, Tamer T Abo Arisheh, Safa Alkhawaja
    Cureus.2023;[Epub]     CrossRef
  • Level of Complete Knowledge on Five Moments of Hand Hygiene among Nurses Working at Integrated Nursing Care Service Wards
    Eunhee Kim, Ihn Sook Jeong
    Journal of Korean Academy of Nursing.2021; 51(4): 454.     CrossRef
Patients’ and General Practitioners’ Views About Preventive Care in Family Medicine in Switzerland: A Cross-sectional Study
Christine Cohidon, Fabienne Imhof, Laure Bovy, Priska Birrer, Jacques Cornuz, Nicolas Senn
J Prev Med Public Health. 2019;52(5):323-332.   Published online September 17, 2019
DOI: https://doi.org/10.3961/jpmph.19.184
  • 5,142 View
  • 130 Download
  • 8 Crossref
AbstractAbstract PDF
Objectives
The aim of this study was to describe general practitioners (GPs)’ opinions and practices of preventive care and patients’ opinions, attitudes, and behaviors towards prevention.
Methods
The data stemmed from a cross-sectional national survey on prevention conducted in Switzerland from 2015 to 2016. In total, 170 randomly drawn GPs and 1154 of their patients participated. The GPs answered an online questionnaire and the patients answered a questionnaire administrated by fieldworkers present at their practices.
Results
Both patients and GPs agreed that delivering preventive care is the dedicated role of a GP. It appeared that beyond classical topics of prevention such as cardiovascular risk factors, other prevention areas (e.g., cannabis consumption, immunization, occupational risks) were scarcely covered by GPs and reported as little-known by patients. In addition, GPs seemed to use a selective approach to prevention, responding to the clinical context, rather than a systematic approach to health promotion. The results also highlight possibilities to improve prevention in family medicine through options such as more supportive tools and public advertising, more time and more delegated tasks and, finally, a more recognized role.
Conclusions
Despite an unfavorable context of prevention within the healthcare system, preventive care in family medicine is reasonably good in Switzerland. However, some limitations appear regarding the topics and the circumstances of preventive care delivery. A global effort is needed to implement necessary changes, and the responsibility should be broadened to other stakeholders.
Summary

Citations

Citations to this article as recorded by  
  • Attitudes of primary care physicians toward bariatric surgery: a free word association networks analysis
    Daniel Gero, Vanessa Müller, Bálint File, Marco Bueter, Jeannette Widmer, Andreas Thalheimer
    Surgery for Obesity and Related Diseases.2023; 19(10): 1177.     CrossRef
  • Evaluation of vaccination coverage in heart failure patients in a tertiary center
    Adrien Maire, Nicolas Chapet, Sylvain Aguilhon, Marie-Lucie Laugier, Paul Laffont-Lozes, Mélinda Rigoni, Betty Mathieu, Yohan Audurier, Cyril Breuker, Gaëlle de Barry, Anne Jalabert, Florence Leclercq, Jean-Luc Pasquié, François Roubille, Audrey Castet-Ni
    Heliyon.2023; 9(7): e18080.     CrossRef
  • Contributions of Japanese Hospitalists During the COVID-19 Pandemic and the Need for Infectious Disease Crisis Management Education for Hospitalists: An Online Cross-Sectional Study
    Masaki Tago, Risa Hirata, Naoko E Katsuki, Yuki Otsuka, Taro Shimizu, Yosuke Sasaki, Kiyoshi Shikino, Takashi Watari, Hiromizu Takahashi, Kazunobu Une, Toshio Naito, Fumio Otsuka, Rachel Thompson, Susumu Tazuma
    Risk Management and Healthcare Policy.2023; Volume 16: 1645.     CrossRef
  • Screening for alcohol use in primary care: assessing French general practitioner practices
    Tangui Barré, Vincent Di Beo, Perrine Roux, Abbas Mourad, Pierre Verger, Lisa Fressard, Thomas Herault, Jean-François Buyck, François Beck, Patrizia Carrieri
    Alcohol and Alcoholism.2023; 58(6): 672.     CrossRef
  • A Cross-Sectional Study of the Prevalence and Determinants of Common Mental Health Problems in Primary Care in Switzerland
    Juliane Messer, Konstantinos Tzartzas, Régis Marion-Veyron, Christine Cohidon
    International Journal of Public Health.2023;[Epub]     CrossRef
  • Turning eating disorders screening in primary practice into treatment: A clinical practice approach
    Tracey D. Wade, Catherine Johnson, Kath Cadman, Lesley Cook
    International Journal of Eating Disorders.2022; 55(9): 1259.     CrossRef
  • General practitioners’ knowledge, preparedness, and experiences of managing COVID-19 in Australia
    Cristina Sotomayor-Castillo, Shizar Nahidi, Cecilia Li, Charlotte Hespe, Penelope L. Burns, Ramon Z. Shaban
    Infection, Disease & Health.2021; 26(3): 166.     CrossRef
  • Primary prevention of sexually transmitted infections in Switzerland: practices of family physicians and their determinants—a national cross-sectional survey
    Hanna Vautrin, Nicolas Senn, Christine Cohidon
    BMJ Open.2020; 10(9): e032950.     CrossRef
Knowledge, Attitudes, and Practices Regarding Tuberculosis in Timor-Leste: Results From the Demographic and Health Survey 2016
Supa Pengpid, Karl Peltzer
J Prev Med Public Health. 2019;52(2):115-122.   Published online February 18, 2019
DOI: https://doi.org/10.3961/jpmph.18.170
  • 8,091 View
  • 288 Download
  • 13 Crossref
AbstractAbstract PDF
Objectives
The aim of this study was to assess knowledge, attitudes, and practices regarding tuberculosis (TB) in the general population in Timor-Leste.
Methods
In the nationally representative cross-sectional 2016 Timor-Leste Demographic and Health Survey, 4622 men (aged 15-59 years) and 12 607 women (aged 15-49 years) were randomly selected using stratified multistage sampling and interviewed.
Results
Overall, 66.9% of men and 62.8% of women were aware of TB, 4.4% of men and 12.6% of women had TB courtesy stigma, and 83.3% of men and 88.6% of women reported intention to receive TB treatment. The mean±standard deviation overall TB knowledge score was 3.9±2.0 (out of 8) among men and 3.0±1.8 among women. In a multivariable linear regression analysis, among both men and women, older age, higher education, rural residence, and sources of TB information (family/friends, school/workplace, health care provider, Internet, television, and newspaper) were associated with higher TB knowledge scores. In addition, among women, higher wealth status and having heard about TB from the radio were associated with higher TB knowledge scores. Negative associations with TB courtesy stigma were found for urban residence and having heard about TB from family or friends among men, and for older age, higher TB knowledge, and TB information sources (family/friends and school/workplace) among women. Among both men and women, higher TB knowledge scores and having heard of TB from a health care provider were associated with intention to receive TB treatment.
Conclusions
This study identified socio-demographic risk factors for deficiences in population-based TB knowledge in Timor-Leste; these findings should be considered when designing TB communication, prevention, and control strategies.
Summary

Citations

Citations to this article as recorded by  
  • Determinants of correct knowledge on tuberculosis transmission and self-reported tuberculosis prevalence among general population aged 15–49 years in Myanmar
    Pyae Linn Aung, Kyawt Mon Win, Htet Myet Win Maung, Kyaw Lwin Show, Seo Ah Hong
    PLOS ONE.2023; 18(8): e0290470.     CrossRef
  • Knowledge, Attitudes, and Perceptions of Tuberculosis in Indonesia: A Multi-Center Cross-Sectional Study
    Silma Kaaffah, Ikhwan Yuda Kusuma, Fransiskus Samuel Renaldi, Yovita Endah Lestari, Arik Dian Eka Pratiwi, Muh Akbar Bahar
    Infection and Drug Resistance.2023; Volume 16: 1787.     CrossRef
  • Tuberculosis related barriers and facilitators among immigrants in Atlantic Canada: A qualitative study
    Isdore Chola Shamputa, Moira A. Law, Clara Kelly, Duyen Thi Kim Nguyen, Tatum Burdo, Jabran Umar, Kimberley Barker, Duncan Webster, Sanghyuk S. Shin
    PLOS Global Public Health.2023; 3(6): e0001997.     CrossRef
  • An insight from National Family Health Surveys on changing trends in prevalence and knowledge regarding T.B. in India
    Ankeeta Menona Jacob, Jeni Jacob
    Indian Journal of Tuberculosis.2023;[Epub]     CrossRef
  • Dengue in Timor-Leste during the COVID-19 phenomenon
    Zito Viegas da Cruz, Afonso Lima Araujo, Alexis Ribas, Choosak Nithikathkul
    Frontiers in Public Health.2023;[Epub]     CrossRef
  • Knowledge, Attitudes, and Stigma: The Perceptions of Tuberculosis in Equatorial Guinea
    Marta Vericat-Ferrer, Alba Ayala, Policarpo Ncogo, Juan Eyene-Acuresila, Belén García, Agustín Benito, María Romay-Barja
    International Journal of Environmental Research and Public Health.2022; 19(14): 8227.     CrossRef
  • Determinants of self-reported correct knowledge about tuberculosis transmission among men and women in Malawi: evidence from a nationwide household survey
    Peter A. M. Ntenda, Razak Mussa, Steve Gowelo, Alick Sixpence, Andy Bauleni, Atusayi Simbeye, Alfred Matengeni, Ernest Matola, Godfrey Banda, Christopher C. Stanley, Susan Banda, Owen Nkoka
    BMC Infectious Diseases.2021;[Epub]     CrossRef
  • INQUÉRITO DE CONHECIMENTO, ATITUDE E PRÁTICA: O AUTOCUIDADO E CONDUTAS DE PACIENTES EM TRATAMENTO PARA TUBERCULOSE
    Ana Caroline Cavalcante de Menezes, Valdízia Mendes e Silva, Jéssica Lins de Oliveira, Mona Laura de Sousa Moraes, Tânia Maria Ribeiro Monteiro de Figueiredo
    Revista interdisciplinar em saúde.2021; 8(Único): 498.     CrossRef
  • The role of mass media exposure on tuberculosis knowledge and attitude among migrant and seasonal farmworkers in Northwest Ethiopia
    Kassahun Alemu Gelaye, Getu Debalkie, Tadesse Awoke Ayele, Sintayehu Daba Wami, Malede Mequanent Sisay, Destaw Fetene, Haileab Fekadu Wolde, Temesgen Yihunie Akalu
    BMC Infectious Diseases.2020;[Epub]     CrossRef
  • Knowledge, attitude and practice towards tuberculosis in Gambia: a nation-wide cross-sectional survey
    Adedapo Olufemi Bashorun, Christopher Linda, Semeeh Omoleke, Lindsay Kendall, Simon D. Donkor, Ma-Ansu Kinteh, Baba Danso, Lamin Leigh, Sheriff Kandeh, Umberto D’Alessandro, Ifedayo Morayo O. Adetifa
    BMC Public Health.2020;[Epub]     CrossRef
  • The Effectiveness of the Environmental Health Services in the Primary Health Care Against the Prevention of Pulmonary Tuberculosis in the Regency of Banyuwangi
    Rachman Setiawan, Endang Sri Lestari, Jojok Mukono, Endro Sukmono
    JURNAL KESEHATAN LINGKUNGAN.2020; 12(3): 211.     CrossRef
  • The Impact of Environmental Health Services in Primary Health Care on Improving the Behavior of Pulmonary Tuberculosis Patients in Banyuwangi Regency
    Sheilla Mufidha Wahyuningtyas, Endang Sri Lestari, Jojok Mukono, Endro Sukmono
    JURNAL KESEHATAN LINGKUNGAN.2020; 12(3): 181.     CrossRef
  • Awareness about tuberculosis and RNTCP services among rural people in Nalgonda district, Telangana
    Sreeharshika Dumpeti, KishoreYadav Jothula, NavyaK Naidu
    Journal of Family Medicine and Primary Care.2020; 9(7): 3281.     CrossRef
Special Article
Lessons From Healthcare Providers' Attitudes Toward Pay-for-performance: What Should Purchasers Consider in Designing and Implementing a Successful Program?
Jin Yong Lee, Sang-Il Lee, Min-Woo Jo
J Prev Med Public Health. 2012;45(3):137-147.   Published online May 31, 2012
DOI: https://doi.org/10.3961/jpmph.2012.45.3.137
  • 16,322 View
  • 121 Download
  • 23 Crossref
AbstractAbstract PDF

We conducted a systematic review to summarize providers' attitudes toward pay-for-performance (P4P), focusing on their general attitudes, the effects of P4P, their favorable design and implementation methods, and concerns. An electronic search was performed in PubMed and Scopus using selected keywords including P4P. Two reviewers screened target articles using titles and abstract review and then read the full version of the screened articles for the final selections. In addition, one reference of screened articles and one unpublished report were also included. Therefore, 14 articles were included in this study. Healthcare providers' attitudes on P4P were summarized in two ways. First, we gathered their general attitudes and opinions regarding the effects of P4P. Second, we rearranged their opinions regarding desirable P4P design and implementation methods, as well as their concerns. This study showed the possibility that some healthcare providers still have a low level of awareness about P4P and might prefer voluntary participation in P4P. In addition, they felt that adequate quality indicators and additional support for implementation of P4P would be needed. Most healthcare providers also had serious concerns that P4P would induce unintended consequences. In order to conduct successful implementation of P4P, purchaser should make more efforts such as increasing providers' level of awareness about P4P, providing technical and educational support, reducing their burden, developing a cooperative relationship with providers, developing more accurate quality measures, and minimizing the unintended consequences.

Summary

Citations

Citations to this article as recorded by  
  • Impact of reimbursement systems on patient care – a systematic review of systematic reviews
    Eva Wagenschieber, Dominik Blunck
    Health Economics Review.2024;[Epub]     CrossRef
  • Pay-for-performance in healthcare provision: the role of discretion in policy implementation in Turkey
    Puren Aktas, Jonathan Hammond, Liz Richardson
    International Journal of Public Sector Management.2023; 36(6/7): 530.     CrossRef
  • Value-based surgery physician compensation model: Review of the literature
    Bethany J. Slater, Amelia T. Collings, Chase Corvin, Jessica J. Kandel
    Journal of Pediatric Surgery.2022; 57(9): 118.     CrossRef
  • Incentivizing performance in health care: a rapid review, typology and qualitative study of unintended consequences
    Xinyu Li, Jenna M. Evans
    BMC Health Services Research.2022;[Epub]     CrossRef
  • Guest editorial
    Fabiana da Cunha Saddi, Lindsay J L Forbes, Stephen Peckham
    Journal of Health Organization and Management.2021; 35(3): 245.     CrossRef
  • Exploring frontliners' knowledge, participation and evaluation in the implementation of a pay-for-performance program (PMAQ) in primary health care in Brazil
    Fabiana da Cunha Saddi, Matthew Harris, Fernanda Ramos Parreira, Raquel Abrantes Pêgo, Germano Araujo Coelho, Renata Batista Lozano, Pedro dos Santos Mundim, Stephen Peckham
    Journal of Health Organization and Management.2021; 35(3): 327.     CrossRef
  • Awareness of, attitude toward, and willingness to participate in pay for performance programs among family physicians: a cross-sectional study
    Chyi-Feng Jan, Meng-Chih Lee, Ching-Ming Chiu, Cheng-Kuo Huang, Shinn-Jang Hwang, Che-Jui Chang, Tai-Yuan Chiu
    BMC Family Practice.2020;[Epub]     CrossRef
  • Brazilian Payment for Performance (PMAQ) Seen From a Global Health and Public Policy Perspective
    Fabiana C. Saddi, Stephen Peckham
    Journal of Ambulatory Care Management.2018; 41(1): 25.     CrossRef
  • The impact of pay-for-performance on the quality of care in ophthalmology: Empirical evidence from Germany
    T. Herbst, J. Foerster, M. Emmert
    Health Policy.2018; 122(6): 667.     CrossRef
  • Hospital-Acquired Infections Under Pay-for-Performance Systems: an Administrative Perspective on Management and Change
    Rebecca A. Vokes, Gonzalo Bearman, Gloria J. Bazzoli
    Current Infectious Disease Reports.2018;[Epub]     CrossRef
  • Perceptions and evaluations of front-line health workers regarding the Brazilian National Program for Improving Access and Quality to Primary Care (PMAQ): a mixed-method approach
    Fabiana da Cunha Saddi, Matthew J. Harris, Germano Araújo Coelho, Raquel Abrantes Pêgo, Fernanda Parreira, Wellida Pereira, Ana Karoline C. Santos, Heloany R. Almeida, Douglas S. Costa
    Cadernos de Saúde Pública.2018;[Epub]     CrossRef
  • Physician attitudes toward participating in a financial incentive program for LDL reduction are associated with patient outcomes
    Tianyu Liu, David A. Asch, Kevin G. Volpp, Jingsan Zhu, Wenli Wang, Andrea B. Troxel, Aderinola Adejare, Darra D. Finnerty, Karen Hoffer, Judy A. Shea
    Healthcare.2017; 5(3): 119.     CrossRef
  • Pay-for-performance reduces healthcare spending and improves quality of care: Analysis of target and non-target obstetrics and gynecology surgeries
    Seung Ju Kim, Kyu-Tae Han, Sun Jung Kim, Eun-Cheol Park
    International Journal for Quality in Health Care.2017; 29(2): 222.     CrossRef
  • Characterization and effectiveness of pay-for-performance in ophthalmology: a systematic review
    Tim Herbst, Martin Emmert
    BMC Health Services Research.2017;[Epub]     CrossRef
  • Would German physicians opt for pay-for-performance programs? A willingness-to-accept experiment in a large general practitioners’ sample
    Christian Krauth, Sebastian Liersch, Sören Jensen, Volker Eric Amelung
    Health Policy.2016; 120(2): 148.     CrossRef
  • Does Pay-For-Performance Program Increase Providers Adherence to Guidelines for Managing Hepatitis B and Hepatitis C Virus Infection in Taiwan?
    Huei-Ju Chen, Nicole Huang, Long-Sheng Chen, Yiing-Jenq Chou, Chung-Pin Li, Chen-Yi Wu, Yu-Chia Chang, Jason Grebely
    PLOS ONE.2016; 11(8): e0161002.     CrossRef
  • Pay-for-performance in resource-constrained settings: Lessons learned from Thailand’s Quality and Outcomes Framework
    Roongnapa Khampang, Sripen Tantivess, Yot Teerawattananon, Sarocha Chootipongchaivat, Juntana Pattanapesaj, Rukmanee Butchon, Natthida Malathong, Francoise Cluzeau, Rachel Foskett-Tharby, Paramjit Gill
    F1000Research.2016; 5: 2700.     CrossRef
  • Pay-for-performance and efficiency in primary oral health care practices in Chile
    Marco Cornejo-Ovalle, Romina Brignardello-Petersen, Glòria Pérez
    Revista Clínica de Periodoncia, Implantología y Rehabilitación Oral.2015; 8(1): 60.     CrossRef
  • Pagamento por desempenho em sistemas e serviços de saúde: uma revisão das melhores evidências disponíveis
    Jorge Otávio Maia Barreto
    Ciência & Saúde Coletiva.2015; 20(5): 1497.     CrossRef
  • When incentives work too well: locally implemented pay for performance (P4P) and adverse sanctions towards home birth in Tanzania - a qualitative study
    Victor Chimhutu, Ida Lindkvist, Siri Lange
    BMC Health Services Research.2014;[Epub]     CrossRef
  • A Qualitative Evaluation of the Performance-based Supplementary Payment System in Turkey
    Ganime Esra Yuzden, Julide Yildirim
    Journal of Health Management.2014; 16(2): 259.     CrossRef
  • Challenges and a response strategy for the development of nursing in China: a descriptive and quantitative analysis
    Yingqiang Wang, Shiyou Wei, Youping Li, Shaolin Deng, Qianqian Luo, Yan Li
    Journal of Evidence-Based Medicine.2013; 6(1): 21.     CrossRef
  • The Possibility of Expanding Pay-for-Performance Program as a Provider Payment System
    Byongho Tchoe, Suehyung Lee
    Health Policy and Management.2013; 23(1): 3.     CrossRef
Original Article
Factors Affecting Public Prejudice and Social Distance on Mental Illness: Analysis of Contextual Effect by Multi-level Analysis
Hyeongap Jang, Jun-Tae Lim, Juhwan Oh, Seon-Young Lee, Yong-Ik Kim, Jin-Seok Lee
J Prev Med Public Health. 2012;45(2):90-97.   Published online March 31, 2012
DOI: https://doi.org/10.3961/jpmph.2012.45.2.90
  • 9,950 View
  • 136 Download
  • 13 Crossref
AbstractAbstract PDF
Objectives

While there have been many quantitative studies on the public's attitude towards mental illnesses, it is hard to find quantitative study which focused on the contextual effect on the public's attitude. The purpose of this study was to identify factors that affect the public's beliefs and attitudes including contextual effects.

Methods

We analyzed survey on the public's beliefs and attitudes towards mental illness in Korea with multi-level analysis. We analyzed the public's beliefs and attitudes in terms of prejudice as an intermediate outcome and social distance as a final outcome. Then, we focused on the associations of factors, which were individual and regional socio-economic factors, familiarity, and knowledge based on the comparison of the intermediate and final outcomes.

Results

Prejudice was not explained by regional variables but was only correlated with individual factors. Prejudice increased with age and decreased by high education level. However, social distance controlling for prejudice increased in females, in people with a high education level, and in regions with a high education level and a high proportion of the old. Therefore, social distance without controlling for prejudice increased in females, in the elderly, in highly educated people, and in regions with a high education and aged community.

Conclusions

The result of the multi-level analysis for the regional variables suggests that social distance for mental illness are not only determined by individual factors but also influenced by the surroundings so that it could be tackled sufficiently with appropriate considering of the relevant regional context with individual characteristics.

Summary

Citations

Citations to this article as recorded by  
  • Mental health literacy for social phobia in Ghana: Investigation of gender stereotypes and previous experience for recognition rates and prejudice
    Peter Adu, Tomas Jurcik, Emmanuel Demah, Patrick T Korang, Dmitry Grigoryev
    International Journal of Social Psychiatry.2024; 70(2): 271.     CrossRef
  • Awareness and attitude about mental illness in the rural population of India: A mixed method study
    Kaustubh S. Kulkarni, Mudita N. Joshi, Harshal S. Sathe, Chetna Maliye
    Indian Journal of Psychiatry.2023; 65(10): 1069.     CrossRef
  • Patient Factors Influencing Outpatient Retention in Patients with Affective and Anxiety Disorders: A Retrospective Study
    Seyeon Chang, Young Sup Woo, Sheng-Min Wang, Hyun Kook Lim, Won-Myong Bahk
    Clinical Psychopharmacology and Neuroscience.2021; 19(3): 545.     CrossRef
  • Sikap terhadap Gangguan Mental pada Mahasiswa Psikologi Universitas Airlangga Berdasarkan Jenis Kelamin
    Grace Ririn, Atika Dian Ariana
    Buletin Riset Psikologi dan Kesehatan Mental (BRPKM).2021; 1(1): 1030.     CrossRef
  • The effect of knowledge on healthcare professionals' perceptions of obesity
    Thazin Wynn, Nazrul Islam, Charlotte Thompson, Khin Swe Myint
    Obesity Medicine.2018; 11: 20.     CrossRef
  • Korean adults’ beliefs about and social distance toward attention-deficit hyperactivity disorder, Tourette syndrome, and autism spectrum disorder
    Subin Park, Yeeun Lee, Chul Eung Kim
    Psychiatry Research.2018; 269: 633.     CrossRef
  • State of the art of population-based attitude research on mental health: a systematic review
    M. C. Angermeyer, G. Schomerus
    Epidemiology and Psychiatric Sciences.2017; 26(3): 252.     CrossRef
  • Beliefs and Prejudices Versus Knowledge and Awareness: How to Cope Stigma Against Mental Illness. A College Staff E-survey
    Chiara Buizza, Alberto Ghilardi, Clarissa Ferrari
    Community Mental Health Journal.2017; 53(5): 589.     CrossRef
  • Knowledge, attitude and social distance practices of young undergraduates towards mental illness in India: A comparative analysis
    Aggarwal Shruti, Shalini Singh, Dinesh Kataria
    Asian Journal of Psychiatry.2016; 23: 64.     CrossRef
  • The effects of low-level laser irradiation on breast tumor in mice and the expression of Let-7a, miR-155, miR-21, miR125, and miR376b
    Vahid Khori, Ali Mohammad Alizadeh, Zohre Gheisary, Sadaf Farsinejad, Farrokh Najafi, Solmaz Khalighfard, Fatemeh Ghafari, Maryam Hadji, Hamid Khodayari
    Lasers in Medical Science.2016; 31(9): 1775.     CrossRef
  • Socially restrictive attitudes towards people with mental illness among the non-psychiatry medical professionals in a university teaching hospital in South India
    Shashwath Sathyanath, Rohan Dilip Mendonsa, Anitha Maria Thattil, Varikkara Mohan Chandran, Ravichandra S Karkal
    International Journal of Social Psychiatry.2016; 62(3): 221.     CrossRef
  • Community attitudes and social distance towards the mentally ill in South Sudan: a survey from a post-conflict setting with no mental health services
    Touraj Ayazi, Lars Lien, Arne Eide, Elizabeth Joseph Shadar Shadar, Edvard Hauff
    Social Psychiatry and Psychiatric Epidemiology.2014; 49(5): 771.     CrossRef
  • Impact of gender and age on attitudes towards mental illness in Sweden
    Béatrice Ewalds-Kvist, Torbjörn Högberg, Kim Lützén
    Nordic Journal of Psychiatry.2013; 67(5): 360.     CrossRef
English Abstracts
Awareness and Attitude Toward Suicide in Community Mental Health Professionals and Hospital Workers.
Soung Nam Kim, Kang Sook Lee, Seon Young Lee, Jae Hee Yu, A Rum Hong
J Prev Med Public Health. 2009;42(3):183-189.
DOI: https://doi.org/10.3961/jpmph.2009.42.3.183
  • 5,691 View
  • 130 Download
  • 10 Crossref
AbstractAbstract PDF
OBJECTIVES
The purpose of this study was to evaluate community mental health professionals and hospital workers attitude and awareness towards suicide. METHODS: This study investigated 264 community mental health professionals and 228 hospital workers. SOQs (Suicidal Opinion Questionnaires) were used from July 2007 to September 2007. After a factor analysis for the attitude towards suicide, the items on ethics, mental illness, religion, risk, and motivation were included in the subsequent analysis. RESULTS: There were significant differences in the attitude towards suicide according to religion, age, educational background, the marriage status, the economic position, and different professional licenses. Hospital workers' view was different from the community workers'. The hospital workers judged that suicide was due to mental illness, and suicide was high for the people in a special environment and who lacked motivation, which caused them to fall in a dangerous situation. For the lower educational group, they thought that suicide was attributable to mental illness. The awareness for suicide was significantly higher in the group with a postgraduate education, unmarried people, mental health professionals and the persons who had concern and experience with suicide. The factors that had an influence on the awareness of suicide were the items of mental illness, religion, risk and motivational factors. CONCLUSIONS: This study suggested that the factors to increase the awareness and attitude for suicide were the experience of increased education and case management of suicide. Therefore, education dealing with suicide and reinforcement of crisis management programs should be developed.
Summary

Citations

Citations to this article as recorded by  
  • Attitude toward Suicidal Behavior: A Cross-Sectional Study among Health-Care Professionals in Northwest Malaysia
    Aimi Izwani Mohd Nazli, Yit Tyse Ooi, Dandaithapani Thyagarajan, Ruzita Jamaluddin
    Malaysian Journal Of Psychiatry.2022; 31(1): 1.     CrossRef
  • The Attitude of Psychiatric and Non-psychiatric Health-care Workers Toward Suicide in Malaysian Hospitals and Its Implications for Training
    Ching Sin Siau, Lei-Hum Wee, Sapini Yacob, Seen Heng Yeoh, Tassha Hilda binti Adnan, Jamaiyah Haniff, Komathi Perialathan, Aziman Mahdi, Abu Bakar Rahman, Choon Leng Eu, Suzaily binti Wahab
    Academic Psychiatry.2017; 41(4): 503.     CrossRef
  • The Relations among Attitude, Competency, and Appropriateness of Work on Student Suicide in Health Teachers
    Jae Soon Yoo, Dallong Han, Chul-Gyu Kim
    The Journal of Korean Academic Society of Nursing Education.2016; 22(4): 473.     CrossRef
  • Preparation to Perform Activities of Suicide Prevention according to Professional Type
    Kyongran Park, Gyungjoo Lee, Min Kwon, Mijung Yeom, Soo Yang
    Journal of Korean Public Health Nursing.2015; 29(1): 40.     CrossRef
  • A Preliminary Study of Knowledge, Attitudes, and Experience Regarding Suicidal Behavior among Mental Health Workers in Korea
    Hye-Jin Kim, Jun-Won Hwang, Jin Hyeong Jhoo, Haak-Seon Kim, Semi Hwang, Kanguk Lee
    Journal of Korean Neuropsychiatric Association.2015; 54(3): 338.     CrossRef
  • Case study of posts before and after a suicide on a Swedish internet forum
    Michael Westerlund, Gergö Hadlaczky, Danuta Wasserman
    British Journal of Psychiatry.2015; 207(6): 476.     CrossRef
  • Investigation of Knowledge, Attitudes, and Experience Regarding Suicidal Behaviors among Psychiatric Residents in Korea : A Cross-Sectional Study
    Kyunglin Lee, Kanguk Lee, Junwon Hwang, Sang Woo Hahn
    Journal of Korean Neuropsychiatric Association.2015; 54(4): 444.     CrossRef
  • Cross-sectional study of attitudes about suicide among psychiatrists in Shanghai
    Yumei Jiao, Michael R Phillips, Yourong Sheng, Guojun Wu, Xianyun Li, Wei Xiong, Liwei Wang
    BMC Psychiatry.2014;[Epub]     CrossRef
  • Relationship Between Depressive Symptoms and Awareness and, Attitude of Suicide in High School Students
    Sung-Ho Song, In-Sun Kwon
    Journal of the Korea Academia-Industrial cooperation Society.2012; 13(6): 2680.     CrossRef
  • Influencing Factors on Suicide Ideation among High School Students
    Sung-Ho Song, Chang-Yeol Kang, Tae-Yong Lee, In-Sun Kwon
    Journal of agricultural medicine and community health.2011; 36(1): 1.     CrossRef
Disparities in Participation in Health Examination by Socio-economic Position among Adult Seoul Residents.
Eun Jeong Chun, Soong Nang Jang, Sung Il Cho, Youngtae Cho, Ok Ryun Moon
J Prev Med Public Health. 2007;40(5):345-350.
DOI: https://doi.org/10.3961/jpmph.2007.40.5.345
  • 4,750 View
  • 38 Download
  • 16 Crossref
AbstractAbstract PDF
OBJECTIVES
To determine the disparity in the rate people undergo health examinations according to socioeconomic position (SEP) and the changes in this disparity with time. METHODS: Seoul citizens}health profile data from 1997 to 2005 were analyzed. The study subjects were 40 years old and over, and the total number of subjects was 6,601 in 1997, 8,994 in 2001, and 8,819 in 2005. Those aged 60 years and over were eliminated from the analysis of subjects}occupation. We used education, family income and occupation as indicators of SEP. The age-standardized health examination attendance rate for each year was calculated according to the education, family income and occupation. The odds ratios (ORs) from multiple logistic regressions were adjusted for age. RESULTS: The disparity in the rate of attendance according to the SEP decreased from 1997 to 2005 but still existed. Even though the disparities among the subgroups according to education, family income and occupation were not that high, the disparity between the group with the highest SEP and the other groups was considerable. CONCLUSIONS: Our findings suggest that unequal access to health examination services according to socioeconomic position still exists. This disparity has decreased recently but the disparity according to level of education was the greatest.
Summary

Citations

Citations to this article as recorded by  
  • Socioeconomic differences in the perception of inequalities in healthcare utilization and health in South Korea
    Nayeon Kim, Hye-won Yun, Juwon Park, Fatima Nari, Hee Jin Wang, Jae Kwan Jun, Kui Son Choi, Mina Suh
    Preventive Medicine Reports.2023; 36: 102445.     CrossRef
  • Association between oral examination and out-of-pocket expenditures on dental care
    Choi Jee-Hye, Kim Nam-Hee
    Journal of Korean Academy of Oral Health.2022; 46(1): 11.     CrossRef
  • Longitudinal Pure‐Tone Threshold Changes in the Same Subjects: Analysis of Factors Affecting Hearing
    Hantai Kim, Jung‐Jun Lee, Yeorae Moon, Hun Yi Park
    The Laryngoscope.2019; 129(2): 470.     CrossRef
  • Impact factors of revisit intention in health examinations and moderator effects of kindness of staff : Focusing on participants of Korea Association of Health Promotion, Gangwon Branch
    Sung Ok Jang, Deuk Jung, Min Jeong Kang, Jong Seok Lee
    Korean Journal of Health Education and Promotion.2018; 35(2): 113.     CrossRef
  • Participation inequality in the National General Health Examination based on enterprise size
    Young Joong Kang, Jong Heun Park, Huisu Eom, Bohwa Choi, Seyoung Lee, Ji-Won Lee, Jun-Pyo Myong
    Annals of Occupational and Environmental Medicine.2017;[Epub]     CrossRef
  • Perception about Age at the Start and End of Periodic Health Examinations: a Survey-based Study on University Hospital in Korea
    Sujeong Shin, Yun-Mi Song, Hyeonyoung Ko, Yoon-Ho Choi, Woo Yong Lee, Son Mi Chung, Sunyoung Park, Insub Kim, Jinyoung Shin
    Korean Journal of Health Promotion.2017; 17(3): 161.     CrossRef
  • Determinants of the Use and Type of Comprehensive Medical Examination Services
    Kwan-Sik Moon, Yang-Kyun Kim, Hye-Jung Chang
    The Korean Journal of Health Service Management.2016; 10(2): 83.     CrossRef
  • A Study on the Determinants of Rescreening for Using the Private Health Screening Program
    Il-Su Park, Yoo-Mi Kim, Sung-Hong Kang
    Journal of Digital Convergence.2015; 13(1): 383.     CrossRef
  • What Factors Cause a Complete Examination of Infant Health Checkup?
    Seungjin Kang, Woojin Chung, Heejin Kim, Sunmi Lee
    Health Policy and Management.2014; 24(3): 261.     CrossRef
  • Changes in the Clinicopathological Characteristics and Outcomes of Thyroid Cancer in Korea over the Past Four Decades
    Bo Youn Cho, Hoon Sung Choi, Young Joo Park, Jung Ah Lim, Hwa Young Ahn, Eun Kyung Lee, Kyung Won Kim, Ka Hee Yi, June-Key Chung, Yeo-Kyu Youn, Nam Han Cho, Do Joon Park, Chang-Soon Koh
    Thyroid.2013; 23(7): 797.     CrossRef
  • The Relationship between Socioeconomic Status and Gastric Cancer Screening in the Population of a Metropolitan Area
    Hyun-Suk Oh, Sun A Kim, Sun-Seog Kweon, Jung-Ae Rhee, So-Yeon Ryu, Min-Ho Shin
    Journal of agricultural medicine and community health.2013; 38(3): 174.     CrossRef
  • Regional Factors Associated with Participation in the National Health Screening Program: A Multilevel Analysis Using National Data
    Hyung-Kook Yang, Dong-Wook Shin, Seung-Sik Hwang, Juwhan Oh, Be-Long Cho
    Journal of Korean Medical Science.2013; 28(3): 348.     CrossRef
  • Socioeconomic disparity in cervical cancer screening among Korean women: 1998–2010
    Minjee Lee, Eun-Cheol Park, Hoo-Sun Chang, Jeoung A Kwon, Ki Bong Yoo, Tae Hyun Kim
    BMC Public Health.2013;[Epub]     CrossRef
  • The Relationship between Trust in Healthcare System and Health Examination Participation
    Baek-Geun Jeong, In-Kyoung Hwang, Hae-Sook Sohn, Kwang-Wook Koh, Tae-Ho Yoon, Jeong-Hun Lim
    Journal of agricultural medicine and community health.2010; 35(4): 395.     CrossRef
  • The Determinants of the Use of Opportunistic Screening Programs in Korea
    Sungwook Kang, Chang Hoon You, Young Dae Kwon
    Journal of Preventive Medicine and Public Health.2009; 42(3): 177.     CrossRef
  • Relationship between Perceived Neighborhood Characteristics and Vigorous Physical Activity among Adult Seoul Residents
    Chung Gun Lee, Youngtae Cho
    Journal of Preventive Medicine and Public Health.2009; 42(4): 215.     CrossRef
A Nationwide Survey on the Hand Washing Behavior and Awareness.
Jae Sim Jeong, Jun Kil Choi, Ihn Sook Jeong, Kyong Ran Paek, Hye Kyung In, Ki Dong Park
J Prev Med Public Health. 2007;40(3):197-204.
DOI: https://doi.org/10.3961/jpmph.2007.40.3.197
  • 25,012 View
  • 375 Download
  • 39 Crossref
AbstractAbstract PDF
OBJECTIVES
This study was conducted to evaluate the public's awareness of the importance of hand washing and to compare perceptions on the habit of hand washing with actual hand washing behavior. METHODS: Data were collected by observing 2,800 participants washing their hands after using public restrooms in seven cities nationwide and by surveying 1,000 respondents (age > 14 years) through telephone interviews using a structured questionnaire. RESULTS: Although 94% of the survey respondents claimed to mostly or always wash their hands after using public restrooms, only 63.4% of the observed participants did wash their hands after using public restrooms. Significant factors related to increased adherence to hand washing were female gender, approximate ages of 20 to 39 years by their appearance, and the presence of other people from the observation. About 79% of the survey respondents always washed their hands after using bathrooms at home, 73% washed their hands before handling food, and 67% washed their hands upon returning to their home. However, 93.2% and 86.3% of the survey respondents did not wash their hands after coughing or sneezing and after handling money, respectively. Although most of the survey respondents (77.6%) were aware that hand washing is helpful in preventing communicable diseases, 39.6% of the survey respondents did not do so because they were 'not accustomed' to washing their hands and 30.2% thought that washing their hands is 'annoying'. CONCLUSIONS: This is the first comprehensive report on hand washing behavior and awareness of the general population in Korea. The result of this study in terms of individual behavior and awareness of hand washing are comparable with similar studies conducted in other countries. However adherence to hand washing is still low and needs to be increased. The results of this study can be used as a baseline in setting up strategies and activities to Bpromote adherence to hand washing.
Summary

Citations

Citations to this article as recorded by  
  • Knowledge and handling practices for raw hen's eggs during purchase, preparation, storage, and consumption: a cross sectional study
    Mohammed Sabbah, Kamal Badrasawi, Lubna Kharraz, Manal Badrasawi
    Scientific Reports.2024;[Epub]     CrossRef
  • Kronik Hastalığı Olan Bireylerin El Yıkama Alışkanlıklarının Belirlenmesi
    Esin SEVGİ DOĞAN, Dilan DENİZ AKAN, Cansu KOŞAR ŞAHİN, Ozden DEDELİ CAYDAM, Sezgi ÇINAR PAKYÜZ
    Bolu Abant Izzet Baysal Universitesi Tip Fakultesi Abant Tip Dergisi.2023; 12(1): 41.     CrossRef
  • Association among the exposure to giving knowledge, attitude and practice for handwashing in people residing in Seoul, South Korea: a retrospective cross-sectional study
    Jayeun Kim, Kyuhyun Yoon
    BMJ Open.2022; 12(2): e053329.     CrossRef
  • Association between years with incidence of communicable diseases focused on COVID-19 and hand hygiene among adults in South Korea: a cross-sectional study
    Yun Hwa Jung, Yu Shin Park, Eun-Cheol Park, Sung-In Jang
    BMC Public Health.2022;[Epub]     CrossRef
  • “I Can Sense When My Hands Need Washing”: A Qualitative Study and Thematic Analysis of Factors Affecting Young Adults’ Hand Hygiene
    Abhinand Thaivalappil, Ian Young, David L Pearl, Jennifer E McWhirter, Andrew Papadopoulos
    Environmental Health Insights.2022; 16: 117863022211299.     CrossRef
  • Knowledge, socio-cognitive perceptions and the practice of hand hygiene and social distancing during the COVID-19 pandemic: a cross-sectional study of UK university students
    Christine Barrett, Kei Long Cheung
    BMC Public Health.2021;[Epub]     CrossRef
  • An Investigation of the General Population’s Self-Reported Hand Hygiene Behaviour and Compliance in a Cross-European Setting
    Aaron Lawson, Marie Vaganay-Miller, Robert Cameron
    International Journal of Environmental Research and Public Health.2021; 18(5): 2402.     CrossRef
  • Analysis of Gender-Dependent Personal Protective Behaviors in a National Sample: Polish Adolescents’ COVID-19 Experience (PLACE-19) Study
    Dominika Guzek, Dominika Skolmowska, Dominika Głąbska
    International Journal of Environmental Research and Public Health.2020; 17(16): 5770.     CrossRef
  • COVID-19 salgını sırasında Türk toplumunun sosyal el yıkama bilgi ve tutumunun değerlendirilmesi
    Yasemin KALKAN UĞURLU, Hanife DURGUN, Esra NEMUTLU, Onurcan KURD
    Journal of Contemporary Medicine.2020; 10(4): 617.     CrossRef
  • Handwashing with soap after potential faecal contact: global, regional and country estimates
    Jennyfer Wolf, Richard Johnston, Matthew C Freeman, Pavani K Ram, Tom Slaymaker, Eric Laurenz, Annette Prüss-Ustün
    International Journal of Epidemiology.2019; 48(4): 1204.     CrossRef
  • Self-perceptions of body weight status according to age-groups among Korean women: A nationwide population-based survey
    Boyoung Park, Ha Na Cho, Eunji Choi, Da Hea Seo, Sue Kim, Yeong-Ran Park, Kui Son Choi, Yumie Rhee, Yongjoo Kim
    PLOS ONE.2019; 14(1): e0210486.     CrossRef
  • Hand Hygiene and Tuberculosis Risk in Korea: An Ecological Association
    Mi Ah Han
    Asia Pacific Journal of Public Health.2018; 30(1): 67.     CrossRef
  • Knowledge and Attitudes towards Handling Eggs in the Home: An Unexplored Food Safety Issue?
    Harriet Whiley, Beverley Clarke, Kirstin Ross
    International Journal of Environmental Research and Public Health.2017; 14(1): 48.     CrossRef
  • Assessment of hand-washing habits among school students aged 6–18 years in Jordan
    Mohammed ALBashtawy
    British Journal of School Nursing.2017; 12(1): 30.     CrossRef
  • Hand washing and Preventive Measures for Middle East Respiratory Syndrome Coronavirus
    So-Hee Lim
    Journal of the Korea Academia-Industrial cooperation Society.2016; 17(2): 427.     CrossRef
  • Factors Influencing Nursing Students’ Performance of Infection Control
    Jong-Rim Choi, Il-Sun Ko, Yeong-Yi Yim
    Journal of Korean Academy of Fundamentals of Nursing.2016; 23(2): 136.     CrossRef
  • Study on the Characteristics of Food-borne Pathogens Isolated from Students' Mobile Phones in Busan
    Sun-Hee Park, Yeon-Kyoung Park, In-Yeong Hwang, Hye-Young Park, Gyung-Hye Sung, Hyeon-Cheol Jo
    Korean Journal of Environmental Health Sciences.2016; 42(4): 255.     CrossRef
  • Turkey Handwashing Survey: suggestion for taking the ecological model into better consideration
    Hakan Tüzün, Kağan Karakaya, Emine Baran Deniz
    Environmental Health and Preventive Medicine.2015; 20(5): 325.     CrossRef
  • The effects and related factors of public service announcement on hand-washing
    Hyun-Soo Kim, Moo-Sik Lee, Byung-Hee Kim, Nam-Young Yang, Hae-Jung Hwang, Jee-Young Hong, Soo-Jin Hong, Eun-Young Kim, Young-Tek Kim, Youn-Jin Park, Go-Un Lim
    Korean Journal of Health Education and Promotion.2015; 32(2): 1.     CrossRef
  • Development of the scale of hygıene behavıors for nursıng students
    Gulay Ipek Coban, Sonay Bilgin
    BMC Medical Research Methodology.2015;[Epub]     CrossRef
  • Relationship between handwashing practices and infectious diseases in Korean students
    Dong-Fang Zhang, Moo-Sik Lee, SuJin Hong, Nam-Young Yang, Hae-Jung Hwang, Byung-Hee Kim, Hyun-Soo Kim, Eun-Young Kim, Yun-Jin Park, Go-Un Lim, Young-Tek Kim
    Journal of agricultural medicine and community health.2015; 40(4): 206.     CrossRef
  • The Status of Handwashing with Soap and its Convergent related Factors in Korean People ; based on Korea National Handwashing Observation Survey, 2013
    Hye-Jeong Hwang, Moo-Sik Lee, Nam-Young Yang, SuJin Hong, Young-Taek Kim
    Journal of Digital Convergence.2015; 13(12): 217.     CrossRef
  • University Students' Cough Etiquette Knowledge and Practice to Protect Droplet Infection
    Bo-Young Jin, Shinmi Kim
    Journal of Korean Biological Nursing Science.2015; 17(4): 348.     CrossRef
  • Related Factors of Handwashing with Soap and its Practices by Students in South Korea
    Nam Young Yang, Moo-Sik Lee, Hae-Jung Hwang, Jee-Young Hong, Byung-Hee Kim, Hyun-Soo Kim, Su-Jin Hong, Eun-Young Kim, Young-Teak Kim, Yun-Jin Park
    Journal of Korean Public Health Nursing.2014; 28(2): 372.     CrossRef
  • Behaviors of hand washing practice Korean adolescents, 2011-2013: The Korea Youth Risk Behavior Web-based Survey
    Young-Sil Choi
    Journal of the Korea Academia-Industrial cooperation Society.2014; 15(7): 4132.     CrossRef
  • Effectiveness of Glove for the Prevention of Microbial Contamination during the Dental Clinical Practice
    Sun-Ju Jeong, Jung-In Kim, Ji-Yeon Kim, Se-Hee Ban, Ji-Young Um, Moon-Jin Jeong, Do-Seon Lim, Soon-Jeong Jeong
    Journal of dental hygiene science.2014; 14(4): 537.     CrossRef
  • Prevalence and Toxin Characteristics of Microorganism on Hand Towels Using for Children in Child Care Center
    Jung-Beom Kim, Nan-Yong Kim, Suk-Ho Kang, Young-Sook Do, Mi-Na Eom, Mi-Hye Yoon, Jong-Bok Lee
    Journal of Food Hygiene and Safety.2013; 28(2): 138.     CrossRef
  • Knowledge, Attitude and Performance on the Hand Washing by Pre-practicum Nursing Students
    Seong-Mi Ryu, You-Jin Lim
    Journal of the Korea Academia-Industrial cooperation Society.2013; 14(11): 5714.     CrossRef
  • A study on handwashing of health science college students
    Eun-Ju Kang, Hwa-Jung Choi
    Journal of Korean society of Dental Hygiene.2013; 13(3): 449.     CrossRef
  • A Study on the Subjectivity about Nursing Student's Attitude after Hand Washing Education
    Yun-Jeong Kim
    The Journal of Digital Policy and Management.2013; 11(12): 621.     CrossRef
  • Knowledge, Attitude, and Performance on the Hand Washing of Health Care related Students
    Seong-Mi Ryu
    Journal of the Korea Academia-Industrial cooperation Society.2013; 14(8): 3916.     CrossRef
  • Prevalence of Microbiological Hazard on Nursery School Children's Hands and Effect of Hand Washing Education
    Jung-Beom Kim, Eun-Seon Hur, Suk-Ho Kang, Dae-Hwan Kim, Young-Sook Do, Po-Hyun Park, Yong-Bae Park, Mi-Hye Yoon, Jong-Bok Lee
    Journal of Food Hygiene and Safety.2012; 27(1): 30.     CrossRef
  • The Korean Nurses Association in New England
    Meekyung Kim, Sun Seog Kim, Kim Choi, Eun Sil Kim
    AJN, American Journal of Nursing.2012; 112(8): 59.     CrossRef
  • Estimation of Nationwide Vaccination Coverage and Comparison of Interview and Telephone Survey Methodology for Estimating Vaccination Status
    Boyoung Park, Yeon-Kyeng Lee, Lisa Y. Cho, Un Yeong Go, Jae Jeong Yang, Seung Hyun Ma, Bo-Youl Choi, Moo-Sik Lee, Jin-Seok Lee, Eun Hwa Choi, Hoan Jong Lee, Sue K. Park
    Journal of Korean Medical Science.2011; 26(6): 711.     CrossRef
  • A Study on the Hand Washing Awareness and Practices of Food-service Employees and the Load of Index Microorganisms on the Hands
    Jeong-Yeong Park, Joong-Soon Kim, Jong-Gyu Kim
    Korean Journal of Environmental Health Sciences.2010; 36(2): 95.     CrossRef
  • A Study on the Hand-washing Awareness and Practices of Male University Students
    Jong-Gyu Kim, Jeong-Young Park, Joong-Soon Kim
    Korean Journal of Environmental Health Sciences.2009; 35(1): 36.     CrossRef
  • A scale for measuring hygiene behavior: Development, reliability and validity
    Richard J. Stevenson, Trevor I. Case, Deborah Hodgson, Renata Porzig-Drummond, Javad Barouei, Megan J. Oaten
    American Journal of Infection Control.2009; 37(7): 557.     CrossRef
  • Impact of supplementary private health insurance on stomach cancer care in Korea: a cross-sectional study
    Dong Wook Shin, Kee-Taig Jung, Sung Kim, Jae-Moon Bae, Young-Woo Kim, Keun Won Ryu, Jun Ho Lee, Jae-Hyung Noh, Tae-Sung Sohn, Young Ho Yun
    BMC Health Services Research.2009;[Epub]     CrossRef
  • Trends of Recent Food-Borne Disease Outbreaks in Korea
    Joon Wuk Kwun, Cheol Heon Lee
    Journal of the Korean Medical Association.2007; 50(7): 573.     CrossRef
Original Articles
Customer's Intention to Use Hospital-based Health Promotion Services.
Myung Il Hahm, Myung Geun Kang, Choon Sun Park, Woo Hyun Cho
Korean J Prev Med. 2003;36(2):108-116.
  • 15,165 View
  • 24 Download
AbstractAbstract PDF
OBJECTIVE
To determine the relationships between customer's attitude, the subjective norm and the intention to use hospital-based health promotion services. METHODS: This study was based on the theory of reasoned action, suggested by Fishbein and Ajzen. The subjects of this study were 501 residents of Seoul, Bun-dang, Il-san and Pyung-chon city, under 65 years, who were stratified by sex and age. A covariance structural analysis was used to identify the structural relationships between attitude towards health promotion programs or services, their subjective norm and their intention to use the aforementioned services. RESULTS: The subjective norm for using the health promotion programs or services provided by hospitals was a significant predictor of the intention to use, but the attitude towards the services was not significant. CONCLUSIONS: Our results suggest that a customer's reference group affects their use of the hospital-based health promotion services. Because the subjects of this study were restricted to specific urban areas, there are limitations to generalizing the study results. Despite the limitations of these results, they can serve as baseline information for the understanding of consumer's behavior toward hospital-based health promotion services.
Summary
Attitudes toward Complementary and Alternative Medicine in Suwon City.
Mi Sook Song, Ki Hong Chun, Hyun Jong Song, In Whee Park, Seung Chul Yoo
Korean J Prev Med. 1999;32(2):162-169.
  • 2,532 View
  • 35 Download
AbstractAbstract PDF
OBJECTIVES
The aim of this study was to investigate the attitudes toward complementary and alternative medicine among 1,490 residents(339 households) in Suwon city. METHODS: All respondents were asked about types, frequency, effects, side-effects, views, and cost of complementary or alternative medicine through a questionnaire from July 24th to 27th. Six therapies were investigated: diet; acupuncture/ massage/ chiropractic etc.; mind control such as Ki/ Yoga/ spiritual therapy/ relaxation therapy etc.; nutritional supplements, cultural remedies; and Herb medications. RESULTS: The results of this survey were as follows: 35.6% of respondents had experiences with at least one or more types of complementary and alternative medicine. The average number of different types of therapies used was 3.4. More experience with various types of therapies were found among those respondents of higher education, older age group, higher income, married group, religious group than among the opposite groups of respondents. Herb medications were used most frequently(39.8%), followed by minor grains(37.9%), Ginseng(23.8%), Boshintang(21.5%), acupuncture(20.3%), Gaesojou (15.3%), Gingko nut(12.0%), mushroom(11.5%), Cupping therapy(10.2%), and black goat(0.0%). Acupuncture and Herb medications were used for treatment of hypertension the most frequently; minor grains or silkworm for treatment of diabetic mellitus; vegetables for treatment of obesity; acupuncture, Cupping Therapy, Herb medications for treatment of rheumatism; and acupuncture, Herb medications, or exercises for treatment of Cerebro Vascular Accident(CVA). The average costs of treatment were 108,000 Won for hypertension, 87,200 Won for diabetic mellitus, 16,800 Won for obesity, 68,800 Won for rheumatism, and 87,500 Won for CVA. Among 10.9% of respondents, there were 13 cases of side-effects with acupuncture, Herb medications, and Gaesojou. Among the cases of side-effects, majority was due to Herb medications. Respondents reported that Cupping Therapy was the most effective, followed by acupuncture, Ginseng, Gingko nut, Boshintang, black goat, minor grains, Gaesojou, Herb medications, vegetables, and mushroom. In response to the views of complementary and alternative medicine which they had used, they recommended minor grains first, followed by Ginseng, acupuncture, Gingko nut, Cupping Therapy, vegetables, Boshintang, black goat, mushroom and Herb medications. In contrast, they did not recommend Herb medications, acupuncture, nor Gaesojou. CONCLUSIONS: These findings indicate that many people use various complementary and alternative medicine without any guidelines for treatment of serious chronic diseases not even to invigorate themselves. It is, therefore, suggested that medical doctors or scientists verify the true effects or side-effects from the most common complementary or alternative therapies through experiments. Also medical doctors should provide a comfortable atmosphere for discussion among doctors and patients who would like to try these therapies.
Summary
Senior Medical Students' Attitudes toward and Knowledge about Breastfeeding.
Mi Young Lee, Mi Jung Kang, Choong Won Lee, Kyu Bok Jin, Eun Jung Suh, Jae Suk Ahn, Suk Kwon Suh
Korean J Prev Med. 1999;32(1):95-100.
  • 1,947 View
  • 26 Download
AbstractAbstract PDF
OBJECTIVES
This study surveyed medical students attending clerkship to assess their attitude toward and knowledge about breastfeeding, and self-confidence to manage common breast-feeding problems. METHODS: A self-report questionnaire was administered to the 323 medical students at four medical colleges in Taegu in May 1997. The response rate was 92.9%, but the respondents used in the final data analysis were 245 (75.8%) due to missing variables. RESULTS: Overall, respondents showed equivocal attitudes toward breastfeeding (mean score 2.9 on a 6-point scale). Knowledge about breastfeeding was substantially low with the median % correct 39.2%. Of nine knowledge areas, weak areas were especially "contraindications and barriers to breastfeeding", "use of breastfeeding aids", "expression and storage of breast milk". Those reported to be confident to manage common breastfeeding problems were only 25.7%. Correlations between knowledge and self-confidence were not statistically significant except in college A (r=0.35, p<0.05). Correlations between knowledge and attitude were not significant. CONCLUSIONS: These results suggest that medical students attending clerkship in Taegu show equivocal attitudes toward breastfeeding, low self-confidence to manage common breastfeeding problems and have substantially limited level of knowledge. There should be more concerted efforts to improve this situation on the part of those involved in breastfeeding education.
Summary
Decision-making process and satisfaction of pregnant women for delivery method.
Hae Ri Jun, Jung Han Park, Soon Woo Park, Chang Kyu Huh, Soon Gu Hwang
Korean J Prev Med. 1998;31(4):751-769.
  • 4,779 View
  • 49 Download
AbstractAbstract PDF
This study was conducted to assess the attitude of pregnant women toward delivery method, understanding of the reason for determining her own delivery method, participation in decision-making process and satisfaction with delivery method after labor. Study subjects were 693 pregnant women who had visited obstetric clinic for prenatal care in the last month of pregnancy in one general hospital and one obstetrics-gynecology specialty hospital in Taegu city from February 1 to March 31 in 1998. A questionnaire was administered before and after labor and a telephone interview was done one month after labor. Proportion of women who had health education and/or counselling about delivery method during prenatal care was 24.0% and this proportion was higher for women who had previous c-section(35.5%) than others. Women thought vaginal delivery is better than c-section for both maternal and baby's health regardless of previous delivery method. About 90% of primipara and multiparous women who had previous vaginal delivery wanted vaginal delivery for the index birth, while 85.6% of multiparous women who had previous c-section wanted repeat c-section. Reasons for choosing c-section in pregnant women who preferred vaginal delivery before labor were recommendation of doctors(81.9%), recommendation of husband(0.8%), agreement between doctor and pregnant woman(4.7%), and mother's demand(12.6%). Reasons for choosing vaginal delivery were mother's demand(30.6%) and no indication for c-section(67.2%). Reasons for choosing c-section in pregnant women who preferred c-section before labor were recommendation of doctors(76.2%), mother's demand(20.0%), recommendation of husband(1.3%), and agreement between doctor and pregnant woman(2.5%). Of the pregnant women who had c-section, by doctor's recommendation, the proportion of women who had heard detailed explanation about reason for c-section by doctor was 55.1%. Mother's statement about the reason for c-section was consistent with the medical record in 75.9%. However, over 5% points disparities were shown between mother's statement and medical record in cases of the repeat c-section and mother's demand. In primipara and multiparous women who had previous vaginal delivery, the delivery method for index birth had statistically significant association with the preference of delivery method before labor(p<0.05). All of the women who had previous c-section had delivered the index baby by c-section. Among mothers who had delivered the index baby vaginally, 84.9% of them were satisfied with their delivery method immediately after labor and 85.1% at 1 month after labor. However, mothers who had c-section stated that they are satisfied with c-section in 44.6% immediately after labor and 42.0% at 1 month after labor. Preferred delivery method for the next birth had statistically significant association with delivery method for the index birth both immediately after labor and in 1 month after labor. The proportion of mothers who prefer vaginal delivery for the next birth increased with the degree of satisfaction with the vaginal delivery for the index birth but the proportion of mothers who prefer c-section for the next birth was high and they did not change significantly with the degree of satisfaction with the c-section for the index birth. These results suggest that the current high technology-based, physician-centered prenatal and partritional cares need to be reoriented to the basic preventive and promotive technology-based, and mother-fetus-centered care. It is also suggested that active involvement of pregnant woman in decision-making process for the delivery method will increase the rate of vaginal birth after c-section and decrease c-section rate and improve the degree of maternal satisfaction after delivery.
Summary
The Difference in Attitude toward Medical Care between Patients and Physicians.
Myung Geun Kang, Jong Ku Park, Han Joong Kim, Myong Sei Sohn, Dal Rae Kim
Korean J Prev Med. 1998;31(3):516-539.
  • 2,038 View
  • 20 Download
AbstractAbstract PDF
The objective of this study is to identify the difference in attitude toward medical care between patients who visited a university hospital or an oriental medical hospital of oriental medical college, and physicians who engaged in the same hospitals. The subjects of this study were 397 cases who agreed to respond the prepared questionnaire, including 288 patients(146 university hospital utilizers and 142 utilizers for an oriental medical hospital) and 109 physicians(76 physicians and 33 oriental medical doctors). The attitude toward medical care was measured by the structured questionnaire developed for this study, which had high validity and reliability according to factor analysis, item discriminant validity, and Cronbach's alpha coefficients. On the criteria of mean value of care and cure score, the attitude toward medical care was classified into 4 groups encompassing a group with dependent attitude on medical care, a group with skeptical attitude toward it, a group with cure-oriented attitude, and a group with care- preferred attitude. The results of chi-square test, discriminant analysis, and logistic regression analysis were as follows; patients who visited a university hospital, patients who visited an oriental hospital, physicians, and oriental medical doctors included in the group with dependent attitude, the group with cure-oriented attitude, the group with skeptical attitude, and the group with care-preferred attitude, retrospectively. Among the subdomains of care and cure domains, which classified in reference to the result of factor analysis on pilot study, those that patients ranked more importantly than physicians were 'the importance of medical equipment for diagnosis and treatment', 'authority of physician, 'aggressiveness of treatment', 'information giving', 'personal interest' in the case of western medicine. In the case of oriental medicine, those were 'the importance of equipment for diagnosis and treatment', 'aggressiveness of treatment', 'amenities and accessibility', 'coordination of medical staff'. Both physicans and patients put the subdomain, 'physicians' medical knowledge and skillfulness' on the highest rank. The differences in ranking the important attributes of medical care between patients and physicians were apparent in the area of an 'importance of medical equipment for diagnosis and treatment' and so on. It meant that patient had over-expectation on medical care and suggested that the policy on demand side such as the development and dissemination of an evidence-based recommendation protocol for health care consumers might be important in Korea. In addition, regarding the attitude of physicians, during the medical education and training it may be necessary to emphasize the aspect of 'care' of medical care rather than 'cure'. In planning on heath care delivery system, it should be considered that there is a difference in the attitude toward medical care between western medicine and oriental medicine as well as between health care providers and consumers. We expect that more valid measurement tool be developed in this area, which may be major limitation of this study and that this kind of research be expanded into the non-academic settings.
Summary

JPMPH : Journal of Preventive Medicine and Public Health