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Original Articles
Risks for Readmission Among Older Patients With Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disease: An Analysis Using Korean National Health Insurance Service – Senior Cohort Data
Yu Seong Hwang, Heui Sug Jo
J Prev Med Public Health. 2023;56(6):563-572.   Published online November 10, 2023
DOI: https://doi.org/10.3961/jpmph.23.346
  • 1,102 View
  • 63 Download
AbstractAbstract AbstractSummary PDF
Objectives
The high readmission rate of patients with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) has led to the worldwide establishment of proactive measures for identifying and mitigating readmissions. This study aimed to identify factors associated with readmission, as well as groups particularly vulnerable to readmission that require transitional care services.
Methods
To apply transitional care services that are compatible with Korea’s circumstances, targeted groups that are particularly vulnerable to readmission should be identified. Therefore, using the National Health Insurance Service’s Senior Cohort database, we analyzed data from 4874 patients who were first hospitalized with COPD from 2009 to 2019 to define and analyze readmissions within 30 days after discharge. Logistic regression analysis was performed to determine factors correlated with readmission within 30 days.
Results
The likelihood of readmission was associated with older age (for individuals in their 80s vs. those in their 50s: odds ratio [OR], 1.59; 95% confidence interval [CI], 1.19 to 2.12), medical insurance type (for workplace subscribers vs. local subscribers: OR, 0.84; 95% CI, 0.72 to 0.99), type of hospital (those with 300 beds or more vs. fewer beds: OR, 0.77; 95% CI, 0.66 to 0.90), and healthcare organization location (provincial areas vs. the capital area: OR, 1.66; 95% CI, 1.14 to 2.41).
Conclusions
Older patients, patients holding a local subscriber insurance qualification, individuals admitted to hospitals with fewer than 300 beds, and those admitted to provincial hospitals are suggested to be higher-priority for transitional care services.
Summary
Korean summary
국내 만성폐쇄성폐질환(COPD)의 위험도 표준화 재입원율은 12.7%로, 주요 진단군 가운데 재입원율이 가장 높다. 국민건강보험공단 노인코호트를 활용하여 COPD로 입원한 환자의 재입원 위험 요인을 파악한 결과 고령 환자, 국민건강보험 지역가입자, 300병상 미만 규모 병원 또는 도 지역 소재 병원 에 입원한 환자의 경우 재입원 위험이 높았다. 재입원 위험이 높은 환자에 대하여 우선적으로 퇴원환자관리 서비스가 제공될 필요가 있다.
Key Message
The risk-standardized readmission rate for COPD in Korea is 12.7%, the highest among major diagnostic groups. Using the National Health Insurance Service Senior Cohort to identify risk factors for the readmission of patients hospitalized with COPD, it was found that older patients, local health insurance subscribers, those hospitalized in facilities with fewer than 300 beds, or in hospitals located in provincial areas had a higher risk of readmission. It is necessary to prioritize transitional care services for patients at a high risk of readmission.
Associations of Ambient Air Pollutant Concentrations With Respiratory Symptoms and Perceived Health Status in Japanese Adults With and Without Chronic Respiratory Diseases: A Panel Study
Motoyuki Nakao, Keiko Yamauchi, Satoshi Mitsuma, Tetsuro Odaira, Hideto Obata, Yoichi Chijimatsu, Yoko Ishihara
J Prev Med Public Health. 2019;52(6):416-426.   Published online November 13, 2019
DOI: https://doi.org/10.3961/jpmph.19.180
  • 5,905 View
  • 99 Download
  • 3 Crossref
AbstractAbstract PDFSupplementary Material
Objectives
In recent years, transboundary air pollution from mainland East Asia has led to growing concerns about air pollution in Japan. Air pollution is reportedly associated with the exacerbation of respiratory diseases. In this study, we assessed the effects of air pollution on respiratory symptoms and the health status of participants with and without chronic respiratory diseases.
Methods
Participants (n=2753) with and without chronic respiratory diseases who visited healthcare facilities in Japan during February from 2010 to 2015 filled out a self-report questionnaire regarding their symptoms and perceived health status. Participants were followed up during April-May and June-July.
Results
Oxidant concentrations were associated with respiratory symptoms, overall health, and quality of life (QoL). Suspended particulate matter (SPM) and particulate matter <2.5 μm levels were associated with physical fitness; SPM was also associated with QoL. Recent experience of an Asian sand dust event had a significant effect on allergic symptoms, change in health, and QoL.
Conclusions
Respiratory symptoms were more strongly affected by oxidants than by other pollutants. Significant associations of air pollutants were found with a comprehensive range of items related to perceived health status, including overall health and QoL. Although the effects of air pollutants on respiratory symptoms and health status were more apparent among patients with respiratory diseases, the adverse effects of air pollutants were significant even among participants without such conditions.
Summary

Citations

Citations to this article as recorded by  
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Brief Report
National Trends in Smoking Cessation Medication Prescriptions for Smokers With Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disease in the United States, 2007-2012
Min Ji Kwak, Jongoh Kim, Viraj Bhise, Tong Han Chung, Gabriela Sanchez Petitto
J Prev Med Public Health. 2018;51(5):257-262.   Published online August 23, 2018
DOI: https://doi.org/10.3961/jpmph.18.119
  • 5,373 View
  • 151 Download
  • 7 Crossref
AbstractAbstract PDF
Objectives
Smoking cessation decreases morbidity and mortality due to chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD). Pharmacotherapy for smoking cessation is highly effective. However, the optimal prescription rate of smoking cessation medications among smokers with COPD has not been systemically studied. The purpose of this study was to estimate the national prescription rates of smoking cessation medications among smokers with COPD and to examine any disparities therein.
Methods
We conducted a retrospective study using National Ambulatory Medical Care Survey data from 2007 to 2012. We estimated the national prescription rate for any smoking cessation medication (varenicline, bupropion, and nicotine replacement therapy) each year. Multiple survey logistic regression was performed to characterize the effects of demographic variables and comorbidities on prescriptions.
Results
The average prescription rate of any smoking cessation medication over 5 years was 3.64%. The prescription rate declined each year, except for a slight increase in 2012: 9.91% in 2007, 4.47% in 2008, 2.42% in 2009, 1.88% in 2010, 1.46% in 2011, and 3.67% in 2012. Hispanic race and depression were associated with higher prescription rates (odds ratio [OR], 5.15; 95% confidence interval [CI], 1.59 to 16.67 and OR, 2.64; 95% CI, 1.26 to 5.51, respectively). There were no significant differences according to insurance, location of the physician, or other comorbidities. The high OR among Hispanic population and those with depression was driven by the high prescription rate of bupropion.
Conclusions
The prescription rate of smoking cessation medications among smokers with COPD remained low throughout the study period. Further studies are necessary to identify barriers and to develop strategies to overcome them.
Summary

Citations

Citations to this article as recorded by  
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Original Article
The Impact of Air Pollution, Including Asian Sand Dust, on Respiratory Symptoms and Health-related Quality of Life in Outpatients With Chronic Respiratory Disease in Korea: A Panel Study
Motoyuki Nakao, Yoko Ishihara, Cheol-Hong Kim, In-Gyu Hyun
J Prev Med Public Health. 2018;51(3):130-139.   Published online May 9, 2018
DOI: https://doi.org/10.3961/jpmph.18.021
  • 8,650 View
  • 246 Download
  • 28 Crossref
AbstractAbstract PDFSupplementary Material
Objectives
Air pollution is a growing concern in Korea because of transboundary air pollution from mainland China. A panel study was conducted to clarify the effects of air pollution on respiratory symptoms and health-related quality of life (HR-QoL) in outpatients with and without chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) in Korea.
Methods
Patients filled out a questionnaire including self-reported HR-QoL in February and were followed up in May and July. The study was conducted from 2013 to 2015, with different participants each year. Air quality parameters were applied in a generalized estimating equation as independent variables to predict factors affecting HR-QoL.
Results
Lower physical fitness scores were associated with Asian sand dust events. Daily activity scores were worse when there were high concentrations of particulate matter (PM) less than 10 μm in diameter (PM10). Lower social functioning scores were associated with high PM less than 2.5 μm in diameter and nitrogen dioxide (NO2) concentrations. High NO2 concentrations also showed a significant association with mental health scores. Weather-related cough was prevalent when PM10, NO2, or ozone (O3) concentrations were high, regardless of COPD severity. High PM10 concentrations were associated with worsened wheezing, particularly in COPD patients.
Conclusions
The results suggest that PM, NO2, and O3 cause respiratory symptoms leading to HR-QoL deterioration. While some adverse effects of air pollution appeared to occur regardless of COPD, others occurred more often and more intensely in COPD patients. The public sector, therefore, needs to consider tailoring air pollution countermeasures to people with different conditions to minimize adverse health effects.
Summary

Citations

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JPMPH : Journal of Preventive Medicine and Public Health