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Original Articles
The Trajectory of Depressive Symptoms Across Years of Community Care Utilization Among Older Adults: A 14-Year Follow-up Study Using the ‘Korean Welfare Panel Survey’
Il-Ho Kim, Cheong-Seok Kim, Min-Hyeok Jeong
J Prev Med Public Health. 2023;56(6):495-503.   Published online October 6, 2023
DOI: https://doi.org/10.3961/jpmph.23.022
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AbstractAbstract AbstractSummary PDF
Objectives
While older adults using community care services are known to be vulnerable for depression, community care utilization (CCU) may help to improve the mental health of these elderly. To date, however, it is much less clear how CCU affects depressive symptoms in the elderly population. This study focuses on the trajectory of depressive symptoms across years of CCU among older adults in Korea.
Methods
Using the 2006-2019 Korean Welfare Panel Survey, this study is focused on elderly born in 1940 or earlier and selected 3281 persons for baseline interviews in 2006. This consisted of 35 800 person-year observations during a period of 14 years. Panel data analysis were employed to construct years of CCU.
Results
After controlling for covariates, linear term of years using community care was negatively associated with depressive symptoms, but a quadratic term was positively significant. The trajectory of depressive symptoms across the years of CCU follows a U-shaped curve. Older adults in the first year of using community care reported the highest level of depressive symptoms. However, a significant and steady decrease in depressive symptoms was observed during the following 9 years of CCU, which then gradually increased. The level of depressive symptoms at the 14th year of using community care remains significantly lower than the level at the outset of its utilization.
Conclusions
This finding implies that CCU could be beneficial for improving mental health among older adults.
Summary
Korean summary
한국복지패널조사(2006-2019년)를 활용하여 지역사회 돌봄서비스의 이용기간(14년 간)에 따른 우울변화궤적을 분석하였다. 분석결과, 지난 14년간 돌봄서비스 이용기간에 따른 우울증상의 궤적은 U자형을 따랐다. 즉 노인은 돌봄서비스를 이용한 첫 해에 가장 높은 우울 수준을 보고하였으며, 이후 9년간 지속적으로 감소하였다가, 점차 증가하는 추세를 보였다.
Key Message
Using the 2006-2019 Korean Welfare Panel Survey, this study focuses on the trajectory of depressive symptoms across years of CCU among older adults in Korea. The trajectory of depressive symptoms across the years of CCU follows a U-shaped curve. Older adults in the first year of using community care reported the highest level of depressive symptoms. However, a significant and steady decrease in depressive symptoms was observed during the following 9 years of CCU, which then gradually increased.
Postpartum Depression in Young Mothers in Urban and Rural Indonesia
Alifa Syamantha Putri, Tri Wurisastuti, Indri Yunita Suryaputri, Rofingatul Mubasyiroh
J Prev Med Public Health. 2023;56(3):272-281.   Published online May 7, 2023
DOI: https://doi.org/10.3961/jpmph.22.534
  • 2,234 View
  • 147 Download
  • 1 Crossref
AbstractAbstract PDF
Objectives
Young mothers are vulnerable to postpartum depression due to role transition-related stress. Understanding the causes underlying these stressors is essential for developing effective interventions.
Methods
This study analyzed the 2018 Indonesian Basic Health Research data. The Mini International Neuropsychiatric Interview was used to assess postpartum depression symptoms in mothers aged 15-24 years with infants aged 0-6 months. In 1285 subjects, the risk factors for postpartum depression were evaluated using multivariate logistic regression.
Results
The overall prevalence of depression in the 6 months postpartum was 4.0%, with a higher prevalence in urban areas (5.7%) than in rural areas (2.9%). Urban and rural young mothers showed distinct postpartum depression risk factors. In urban areas, living without a husband (odds ratio [OR], 3.82; 95% confidence interval [CI], 1.24 to 11.76), experiencing preterm birth (OR, 4.67; 95% CI, 1.50 to 14.50), having pregnancy complications (OR, 3.03; 95% CI, 1.20 to 7.66), and having postpartum complications (OR, 5.23; 95% CI, 1.98 to 13.80) were associated with a higher risk of postpartum depression. In rural areas, postpartum depression was significantly associated with a smaller household size (OR, 3.22; 95% CI, 1.00 to 10.38), unwanted pregnancy (OR, 4.40; 95% CI, 1.15 to 16.86), and pregnancy complications (OR, 3.41; 95% CI, 1.31 to 8.88).
Conclusions
In both urban and rural contexts, postpartum depression relates to the availability of others to accompany young mothers throughout the postpartum period and offer support with reproductive issues. Support from the family and the healthcare system is essential to young mothers’ mental health. The healthcare system needs to involve families to support young mothers’ mental health from pregnancy until the postpartum period.
Summary

Citations

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  • Qualitative Study of Perinatal Mental Health Services: Experiences and Perspectives of Health Workers and Patients
    Evi Diliana Rospia, Dwi Kartika Cahyaningtyas, Siti Mardiyah WD, Cahaya Indah Lestari
    EMBRIO.2023; 15(2): 216.     CrossRef
Special Article
Examining the Role of Psychosocial Stressors in Hypertension
Komal Marwaha
J Prev Med Public Health. 2022;55(6):499-505.   Published online November 30, 2022
DOI: https://doi.org/10.3961/jpmph.21.266
  • 3,814 View
  • 221 Download
  • 5 Crossref
AbstractAbstract PDF
Despite advances in medicine and preventive strategies, fewer than 1 in 5 people with hypertension have the problem under control. This could partly be due to gaps in fully elucidating the etiology of hypertension. Genetics and conventional lifestyle risk factors, such as the lack of exercise, unhealthy diet, excess salt intake, and alcohol consumption, do not fully explain the pathogenesis of hypertension. Thus, it is necessary to revisit other suggested risk factors that have not been paid due attention. One such factor is psychosocial stress. This paper explores the evidence for the association of psychosocial stressors with hypertension and shows that robust evidence supports the role of a chronic stressful environment at work or in marriage, low socioeconomic status, lack of social support, depression, anxiety, post-traumatic stress, childhood psychological trauma, and racial discrimination in the development or progression of hypertension. Furthermore, the potential pathophysiological mechanisms that link psychosocial stress to hypertension are explained to address the ambiguity in this area and set the stage for further research.
Summary

Citations

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  • Health-related factors and dysregulation of epigenetic related genes in metabolic syndrome trigger finger patients and smoker trigger finger patients: preliminary analysis of patient-derived sample
    Abdulaziz M. F. Shayea, Amna A. Alshatti, Danah H. Alfadhli, Almutairi Fatimah Ibrahim, Mariam Kh. Almutairi, Mohammed Sh. Nadar
    Journal of Orthopaedic Surgery and Research.2023;[Epub]     CrossRef
  • Adjustment disorders, hypertension and type 2 diabetes: a cardiologist’s view (literature review)
    D.K. Miloslavsky, S.M. Koval
    INTERNATIONAL JOURNAL OF ENDOCRINOLOGY (Ukraine).2023; 19(5): 383.     CrossRef
  • Letter to the Editor: Insights on Health, Religion/Spirituality, and Vulnerable Populations
    Fides A. del Castillo
    Journal of Preventive Medicine and Public Health.2023; 56(1): 97.     CrossRef
  • Moderating effect of mindfulness on the relationship between anxiety and somatization symptoms in middle‐aged and elderly female patients with hypertension
    Haifei Shen, Ri Zhang, XiuJie Zhang, Ying Zhang, Yan Liu, Wei Song, Yunpeng Cheng, Minghui Yang, Yinong Jiang, Yan Lu
    The Journal of Clinical Hypertension.2023; 25(7): 647.     CrossRef
  • Exploring the health of child protection workers: A call to action
    Javier F. Boyas, Debra Moore, Maritza Y. Duran, Jacqueline Fuentes, Jana Woodiwiss, Leah McCoy, Antonella Cirino
    Health Promotion Perspectives.2022; 12(4): 381.     CrossRef
Original Articles
Associations of Socioeconomic Status With Depression and Quality of Life in Patients With Hypertension: An Analysis of Data From the 2019 Community Health Survey in Korea
Hye Ri Kim, Mia Son
J Prev Med Public Health. 2022;55(5):444-454.   Published online August 24, 2022
DOI: https://doi.org/10.3961/jpmph.22.214
  • 2,205 View
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AbstractAbstract AbstractSummary PDF
Objectives
We aimed to identify the factors related to depression and quality of life in patients with hypertension by using multilevel regression analysis.
Methods
In 2019, 229 043 participants in the Korean Community Health Survey were selected as the study group. Individual factors were identified using data from the 2019 Community Health Survey. Regional factors were identified using data from the National Statistical Office of Korea. Multilevel regression analysis was conducted to find individual and local factors affecting depression and quality of life in patients with hypertension and to determine any associated interactions.
Results
As individual factors in patients with hypertension, women, those with lower education-levels, recipients of basic livelihood benefits, and those with poor dietary conditions showed stronger associations with depression and quality of life. As regional factors and individual-level variables in patients with hypertension, lower gross regional personal income, fewer doctors at medical institutions, and lower rates of participation in volunteer activities presented stronger associations with depression and quality of life. In addition, the associations of depression with gross regional personal income, the number of doctors at medical institutions, and dietary conditions were significantly stronger in patients with hypertension than in patients without hypertension. The associations of gender and employment status with quality of life were also significantly greater.
Conclusions
Policy interventions are needed to adjust health behaviors, prevent depression, and improve quality of life for patients with hypertension, especially for those with the risk factors identified in this study.
Summary
Korean summary
2019년 지역사회건강조사, 대한민국 통계청 자료를 통해, 다수준 회귀분석을 이용하여 고혈압 환자의 우울 및 삶의 질과 관련된 요인을 파악한 결과, 비고혈압 집단 대비 고혈압 환자의 지역총소득, 의료기관 종사 의사수, 식생활 형편이 우울과 연관성이 유의미하게 컸고, 성별, 직업수준이 삶의 질과 연관성이 유의미하게 컸다.
“Leisure Life Satisfaction:” Will It Have a Beneficial Impact on Depression Among Older Adults in Community Care Settings in Korea?
Il-Ho Kim, Cheong-Seok Kim
J Prev Med Public Health. 2022;55(4):398-406.   Published online July 7, 2022
DOI: https://doi.org/10.3961/jpmph.22.160
  • 2,429 View
  • 92 Download
  • 5 Crossref
AbstractAbstract AbstractSummary PDF
Objectives
While the risk of depression is expected to substantially increase among older adults receiving community care, leisure life satisfaction can be regarded as a key component in enhancing the mental health of those receiving community care. However, it is not yet known whether community care utilization increases the risk of depression, or what role is played by leisure life satisfaction in these settings. This study investigated the relationship between community care utilization and depression, as well as the main effect and the moderating role of leisure life satisfaction on the link between community care utilization and depression among older adults.
Methods
This study, using the 2019 Korean Welfare Panel Survey, conducted multiple regression analysis on data from 4494 elderly people aged 65 years or older.
Results
After controlling for potential covariates, older community care recipients were more likely to report symptoms of depression than those who did not receive community care. Meanwhile, leisure life satisfaction was negatively associated with depression in older adults. The test for interaction between community care utilization and leisure life satisfaction revealed that leisure life satisfaction significantly attenuated the link between depression and community care utilization.
Conclusions
The findings of this study imply that leisure life satisfaction could play a meaningful role in improving the mental health of older adults receiving community care. Welfare policies affecting older adults should consider leisure life satisfaction as an important resource for reducing depression in community care settings.
Summary
Korean summary
본 연구는 2019년 한국복지패널조사의 4,494명의 노인들을 대상으로 돌봄노인의 우울 수준과 여가생활 만족의 조절효과를 검증하였다. 연구결과, 돌봄노인의 우울증상이 일반노인에 비하여 유의하게 높았다(p<0.001). 반면 여가생활 만족은 돌봄서비스 이용노인의 우울 증상을 조절하는 효과가 있었다. 이 연구의 결과는 여가생활 만족이 돌봄노인의 정신건강을 향상시키는데 의미 있는 역할을 할 수 있다는 것을 암시한다.

Citations

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  • Leisure and Happiness of the Elderly: A Machine Learning Approach
    Eui-Jae Kim, Hyun-Wook Kang, Seong-Man Park
    Sustainability.2024; 16(7): 2730.     CrossRef
  • Social engagement and subjective health among older adults in South Korea: Evidence from the Korean Longitudinal Study of Aging (2006–2018)
    Bo Zhao, Ji Eon Kim, Jiyoung Moon, Eun Woo Nam
    SSM - Population Health.2023; 21: 101341.     CrossRef
  • Do the various leisure forms have equal effects on mental health? A longitudinal analysis of self-selected leisure activities
    Junyi Bian, Zubing Xiang
    Frontiers in Public Health.2023;[Epub]     CrossRef
  • Development of a prediction model for the depression level of the elderly in low-income households: using decision trees, logistic regression, neural networks, and random forest
    Kyu-Min Kim, Jae-Hak Kim, Hyun-Sill Rhee, Bo-Young Youn
    Scientific Reports.2023;[Epub]     CrossRef
  • The Trajectory of Depressive Symptoms Across Years of Community Care Utilization Among Older Adults: A 14-Year Follow-up Study Using the ‘Korean Welfare Panel Survey’
    Il-Ho Kim, Cheong-Seok Kim, Min-Hyeok Jeong
    Journal of Preventive Medicine and Public Health.2023; 56(6): 495.     CrossRef
Systematic Review
Low Social Support and Risk for Depression in People With Type 2 Diabetes Mellitus: A Systematic Review and Meta-analysis
Akhmad Azmiardi, Bhisma Murti, Ratih Puspita Febrinasari, Didik Gunawan Tamtomo
J Prev Med Public Health. 2022;55(1):37-48.   Published online January 10, 2022
DOI: https://doi.org/10.3961/jpmph.21.490
  • 4,337 View
  • 188 Download
  • 8 Web of Science
  • 10 Crossref
AbstractAbstract PDF
Objectives
Depression is a frequent complication of type 2 diabetes mellitus. This study aimed to investigate the relationship between low social support and risk for depression in people with type 2 diabetes through a meta-analysis.
Methods
PubMed, ProQuest, SpringerLink, ScienceDirect, Scopus, the Cochrane Library, Embase, and Google Scholar were searched for English-language articles published up to 2021. Pooled adjusted odds ratios (aORs) were calculated using a random-effect model with 95% confidence intervals (CIs). Heterogeneity was evaluated by using the Cochrane Q test and I2 statistics. The risk of publication bias was estimated using a funnel plot, the Egger test, and the Begg test. The Joanna Briggs Institute Critical Appraisal Tools were used to assess the quality of evidence and the risk of bias.
Results
Eleven studies were included in this meta-analysis, containing a total of 3151 people with type 2 diabetes mellitus. The pooled analysis showed that people with type 2 diabetes mellitus who had low social support had twice as high a risk of depression as those with high social support (aOR, 2.02; 95% CI, 1.51 to 2.70; p<0.001). A random-effect model was used because the heterogeneity was high (I2= 87%).
Conclusions
Low social support was found to increase the risk of depression among people with type 2 diabetes mellitus. Further investigation into factors that may moderate this relationship is required.
Summary

Citations

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  • Staying connected: An umbrella review of meta-analyses on the push-and-pull of social connection in depression
    Luisa De Risio, Mauro Pettorruso, Rebecca Collevecchio, Barbara Collacchi, Marta Boffa, Mario Santorelli, Massimo Clerici, Giovanni Martinotti, Francesca Zoratto, Marta Borgi
    Journal of Affective Disorders.2024; 345: 358.     CrossRef
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    Amani Busili, Kanta Kumar, Laura Kudrna, Idris Busaily
    Heliyon.2024; 10(7): e28782.     CrossRef
  • Effectiveness of social support-based interventions in preventing depression in people without clinical depression: A systematic review and meta-analysis of randomized controlled trials
    Henar Campos-Paíno, Patricia Moreno-Peral, Irene Gómez-Gómez, Sonia Conejo-Cerón, Santiago Galán, Sara Reyes-Martín, Juan Ángel Bellón
    International Journal of Social Psychiatry.2023; 69(2): 253.     CrossRef
  • Individuelle Behandlung bei Glaukompatienten mit einem Diabetes mellitus
    Jan Luebke
    Klinische Monatsblätter für Augenheilkunde.2023; 240(02): 142.     CrossRef
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    Rehanguli Maimaitituerxun, Wenhang Chen, Jingsha Xiang, Atipatsa C. Kaminga, Xin Yin Wu, Letao Chen, Jianzhou Yang, Aizhong Liu, Wenjie Dai
    BMC Psychiatry.2023;[Epub]     CrossRef
  • The prevalence and predictors of depression and disability in older adults and elderly patients with Diabetes in India: Cross-sectional analysis from the Longitudinal Study on Ageing
    Baani Sodhi, Mansi Malik, Paras Agarwal, Saurav Basu
    Diabetes & Metabolic Syndrome: Clinical Research & Reviews.2023; 17(4): 102765.     CrossRef
  • Depression and determinants among diabetes mellitus patients in Ethiopia, a systematic review and meta-analysis
    Kirubel Dagnaw Tegegne, Natnael Atnafu Gebeyehu, Mesfin Wudu Kassaw
    BMC Psychiatry.2023;[Epub]     CrossRef
  • Individuelle Behandlung bei Glaukompatienten mit einem Diabetes mellitus
    Jan Lübke
    Diabetes aktuell.2023; 21(02): 68.     CrossRef
  • Diabetes and Mental Health
    David J. Robinson, Kimberley Hanson, Akshay B. Jain, Jessica C. Kichler, Gaurav Mehta, Osnat C. Melamed, Michael Vallis, Harpreet S. Bajaj, Tracy Barnes, Jeremy Gilbert, Kristin Honshorst, Robyn Houlden, James Kim, Joanne Lewis, Barbara MacDonald, Dylan M
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  • The association between screen time and depression symptoms severity among adults with diabetes: A cross-sectional study
    Layan Sukik, Bushra Hoque, Linda Boutefnouchet, Mohamed Elhadary, Hiba Bawadi, Mujahed Shraim
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Original Articles
Determinants of Depression in Indonesian Youth: Findings From a Community-based Survey
Indri Yunita Suryaputri, Rofingatul Mubasyiroh, Sri Idaiani, Lely Indrawati
J Prev Med Public Health. 2022;55(1):88-97.   Published online December 28, 2021
DOI: https://doi.org/10.3961/jpmph.21.113
  • 4,019 View
  • 218 Download
  • 1 Web of Science
  • 2 Crossref
AbstractAbstract PDF
Objectives
This study investigated the determinants of depression in adolescents and young adults.
Methods
The present study analyzed data from the 2018 Indonesia Basic Health Survey (Riset Kesehatan Dasar; RISKESDAS). The study subjects were adolescents (15-17 years old) and young adults (18-24 years old). In total, 64 179 subjects were included. Univariable, bivariable, and multivariable logistic regression analyses were performed to determine associations between youths’ characteristics, risky behavior, chronic disease, parents’ health, and youths’ depression.
Results
The prevalence of depression was 5.1% in adolescents and 5.6% in young adults. The risk factors for depression in adolescents were being women (adjusted odds ratio [aOR], 3.53; 95% confidence interval [CI], 2.89 to 4.30; p<0.001), an ex-smoker (aOR, 2.99; 95% CI, 2.10 to 4.25; p<0.001), or a current smoker (aOR, 2.60; 95% CI, 1.97 to 3.44; p<0.001); consuming alcohol (aOR, 2.00; 95% CI, 1.33 to 3.01; p=0.001), having a chronic disease (aOR, 2.64; 95% CI, 1.41 to 4.96; p=0.002); maternal depression (aOR, 2.47; 95% CI, 1.97 to 3.09; p<0.001); and paternal depression (aOR, 2.63; 95% CI, 1.98 to 3.50; p<0.001). In young adults, the risk factors were being women (aOR, 2.23; 95% CI, 1.82 to 2.75; p<0.001) or an ex-smoker (aOR, 2.47; 95% CI, 1.67 to 3.67; p<0.001), consuming alcohol (aOR, 2.42; 95% CI, 1.89 to 3.09; p<0.001), maternal depression (aOR, 3.12; 95% CI, 2.54 to 3.84; p<0.001), and paternal depression (aOR, 2.80; 95% CI, 2.17 to 3.63; p<0.001).
Conclusions
Being women, smoking, drinking alcohol, having a chronic disease, and having a parent with depression were crucial factors associated with youth depression. Mental health screening, prevention, and treatment should involve collaboration among primary healthcare, schools, universities, professionals, and families.
Summary

Citations

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  • Mental health issues and quality of life amongst school-based adolescents in Indonesia
    Andry Juliansen, Rivaldo Steven Heriyanto, Michelle Patricia Muljono, Charista Lydia Budiputri, Yulita Delfia Sari Sagala, Gilbert Sterling Octavius
    Journal of Medicine, Surgery, and Public Health.2024; 2: 100062.     CrossRef
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    Lafi Munira, Pranee Liamputtong, Pramon Viwattanakulvanid
    Belitung Nursing Journal.2023; 9(2): 110.     CrossRef
Associations Between Parental Depression and Early Childhood Development in Indonesia: A Cross-sectional Study
Ika Saptarini, Anissa Rizkianti, Prisca Petty Arfines, Suparmi , Iram Barida Maisya
J Prev Med Public Health. 2021;54(6):451-460.   Published online November 10, 2021
DOI: https://doi.org/10.3961/jpmph.21.158
  • 3,372 View
  • 149 Download
  • 1 Web of Science
  • 1 Crossref
AbstractAbstract PDFSupplementary Material
Objectives
This study aimed to determine the associations between parental depression and early childhood development among children aged 36 months to 59 months in Indonesia.
Methods
From Indonesia’s Basic Health Survey (RISKESDAS) 2018, this study included 6433 children aged 36 months to 59 months and their parents. Maternal and paternal depression was examined using the Mini International Neuropsychiatric Interview survey instrument, which was previously translated into Indonesian. The study also used the Early Child Development Index to measure child development and its 4 domains (cognitive, physical, socio-emotional, and learning). Multivariate logistic regression analysis was performed to determine the association between parental depression and early childhood development.
Results
Overall, 10.3% of children aged 36 months to 59 months were off-track for development. After adjusting for biological, parental, and social characteristics, children born to parents with depression were found to be 4.72 times more likely to be off-track for development (95% confidence interval, 1.83 to 12.15).
Conclusions
Children of depressed parents were more likely to be off-track for development. The findings highlight the need for early diagnosis and timely intervention for parental depression to promote early childhood development.
Summary

Citations

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  • Impact of adverse childhood experiences (ACE) on the development of 18-months-old children
    Mariana Lacerda Gontijo, Janaína Matos Moreira, Thiago Rosental Silva, Claudia Regina Lindgren Alves
    Journal of Affective Disorders Reports.2022; 10: 100401.     CrossRef
Regional Differences in the Effects of Social Relations on Depression Among Korean Elderly and the Moderating Effect of Living Alone
Chanki Kim, Eun Jee Chang, Chang-yup Kim
J Prev Med Public Health. 2021;54(6):441-450.   Published online October 22, 2021
DOI: https://doi.org/10.3961/jpmph.21.337
  • 3,275 View
  • 127 Download
  • 6 Web of Science
  • 7 Crossref
AbstractAbstract AbstractSummary PDFSupplementary Material
Objectives
Socioeconomic disadvantages interact with numerous factors which affect geriatric mental health. One of the main factors is the social relations of the elderly. The elderly have different experiences and meanings in their social lives depending on their socio-cultural environment. In this study, we compared the effects of social relations on depression among the elderly according to their living arrangement (living alone or living with others) and residential area.
Methods
We defined social relations as “meetings with neighbors” (MN). We then analyzed the impact of MN on depression using data from the Korean Longitudinal Study of Aging Panel with the generalized estimating equation model. We also examined the moderating effect of living alone and performed subgroup analysis by dividing the sample according to which area they lived in.
Results
MN was associated with a reduced risk of depressive symptoms among elderlies. The size of the effect was larger in rural areas than in large cities. However, elderly those who lived alone in rural areas had a smaller protective impact of MN on depression, comparing to those who lived with others. The moderating effect of living alone was significant only in rural areas.
Conclusions
The social relations among elderlies had a positive effect on their mental health: The more frequent MN were held, the less risk of depressive symptoms occurred. However, the effect may vary depending on their living arrangement and environment. Thus, policies or programs targeting to enhance geriatric mental health should consider different socio-cultural backgrounds among elderlies.
Summary
Korean summary
본 연구는 사회적 관계가 노인의 우울에 미치는 영향이 독거 상태 및 거주 지역에 따라 달라지는지 확인하였다. 사회적 관계를 이웃과의 만남 빈도로 정의하고 고령화연구패널자료를 분석한 결과 사회적 관계의 효과 크기는 대도시에서 가장 작었고 독거의 조절효과는 농어촌에서만 유의하였다.

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    Doo Woong Lee, Jieun Jang, Jaeyong Shin
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    Jeong-Hye Park, Se-Won Kang
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    Bongjeong Kim, Jinseub Hwang, Dohyang Kim, Soo Jin Kang
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    Lisa Ann Kirk Wiese, Allison Gibson, Marc Aaron Guest, Amy R. Nelson, Raven Weaver, Aditi Gupta, Owen Carmichael, Jordan P. Lewis, Allison Lindauer, Samantha Loi, Rachel Peterson, Kylie Radford, Elizabeth K. Rhodus, Christina G. Wong, Megan Zuelsdorff, La
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    Guangjun Zheng, Biying Zhou, Zhenger Fang, Chunxia Jing, Sui Zhu, Mingliang Liu, Xia Chen, Lei Zuo, Haiyan Chen, Guang Hao
    BMC Psychiatry.2023;[Epub]     CrossRef
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    Daolin Wu, Fuwei Liu, Shan Huang
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  • Effects of Serious Games on Depression in Older Adults: Systematic Review and Meta-analysis of Randomized Controlled Trials
    Yesol Kim, Soomin Hong, Mona Choi
    Journal of Medical Internet Research.2022; 24(9): e37753.     CrossRef
Associations of Handgrip Strength and Handgrip Strength Asymmetry With Depression in the Elderly in Korea: A Cross-sectional Study
Kyungduk Hurh, Yoonsik Park, Gyu Ri Kim, Sung-In Jang, Eun-Cheol Park
J Prev Med Public Health. 2021;54(1):63-72.   Published online December 30, 2020
DOI: https://doi.org/10.3961/jpmph.20.315
  • 3,899 View
  • 153 Download
  • 13 Web of Science
  • 13 Crossref
AbstractAbstract AbstractSummary PDFSupplementary Material
Objectives
Recent studies have suggested that assessing handgrip strength (HGS) asymmetry together with HGS may be helpful for evaluating problems in geriatric patients. This study aimed to identify whether HGS asymmetry, weakness, or both were associated with depression in Korean older adults.
Methods
This study included 4274 subjects from the sixth and seventh Korea National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey. Depression was measured using the Patient Health Questionnaire-9. The maximum HGS of the dominant hand was used as a representative value. HGS symmetry was categorized by the ratio of the HGS of the dominant hand to that of non-dominant hand. The odds ratio (OR) for depression was calculated according to the HGS and its symmetry.
Results
In total, 240 (12.5%) men and 534 (22.7%) women had depression. HGS or HGS asymmetry showed no statistically significant associations with depression in elderly men. Elevated odds of depression were observed in elderly women with low HGS (OR, 1.93; 95% confidence interval [CI], 1.33 to 2.81) or prominent HGS asymmetry (OR, 1.46; 95% CI, 1.02 to 2.08). There was a positive additive interaction between asymmetric HGS and weakness, as women with low and prominently asymmetric HGS showed higher odds of depression (OR, 3.77; 95% CI, 2.16 to 6.59) than women with high and symmetric HGS.
Conclusions
Depression in elderly Korean women was associated with both low and asymmetric HGS. Our findings support the potential value of HGS asymmetry as an indicator of HGS.
Summary
Korean summary
본 연구에서는 국민건강영양조사 자료를 이용하여, 국내 60세 이상 노인 인구에서 악력 저하 및 양손 악력의 비대칭과 우울증 유병과의 상관관계를 분석하였다. 분석 결과 60세 이상 여성에서 악력 저하 및 양손 악력의 비대칭이 우울증 유병과 관련이 있었으며, 악력 저하와 비대칭이 동반된 경우에는 우울증 유병에 대하여 상가작용이 존재하였다. 이는 향후 노인의 악력 측정 시, 양손 악력의 비대칭에 대하여도 주목할 필요가 있음을 시사한다.

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  • Risk factors associated with weak and asymmetric handgrip strength in older Chinese adults
    Minghui Weng, Jianlin Pu, Binyou Wang, Yilin Wang
    American Journal of Human Biology.2024;[Epub]     CrossRef
  • Handgrip strength asymmetry cut points to identify slow gait speed in six low- and middle-income countries: A cross-sectional analysis with 12,669 older adults
    Pedro Pugliesi Abdalla, Lucimere Bohn, Emerson Sebastião, André Pereira dos Santos, Marcio Fernando Tasinafo Junior, Leonardo Santos Lopes da Silva, Thiago Cândido Alves, Euripedes Barsanulfo Gonçalves Gomide, Ana Claudia Rossini Venturini, Jorge Mota, Da
    Archives of Gerontology and Geriatrics.2023; 106: 104869.     CrossRef
  • Association between vitamin K intake and depressive symptoms in US adults: Data from the National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey (NHANES) 2013–2018
    Yuyi Zhang, Weiliang Tan, Xiaolan Xi, Hui Yang, Ke Zhang, Shengnan Li, Xuefen Chen, Hui Zuo
    Frontiers in Nutrition.2023;[Epub]     CrossRef
  • Preoperative low handgrip strength (HGS) with HGS asymmetry is associated with adverse outcomes among older adults with gastric cancer
    Xueyi Miao, Lingyu Ding, Jinling Lu, Hanfei Zhu, Kang Zhao, Xinyi Xu, Shuqin Zhu, Li Chen, Jieman Hu, Qin Xu
    Journal of Geriatric Oncology.2023; 14(7): 101583.     CrossRef
  • Low handgrip strength with or without asymmetry is associated with elevated all‐cause mortality risk in older Chinese males
    Duanfang Cai, Hongli Zhang, Yilin Wang
    Geriatrics & Gerontology International.2023; 23(9): 692.     CrossRef
  • Associations of handgrip weakness and asymmetry with new-onset stroke in Chinese middle-aged and older adults: a cohort study
    Yuying Zhang, Weiqing Chen, Bing Cao, Li Lin, Jinghua Li, Vivian Yawei Guo
    Frontiers in Public Health.2023;[Epub]     CrossRef
  • The relationship between low handgrip strength with or without asymmetry and fall risk among middle-aged and older males in China: evidence from the China Health and Retirement Longitudinal Study
    Yilin Wang, Yalian Huang, Xiaoyan Chen
    Postgraduate Medical Journal.2023; 99(1178): 1246.     CrossRef
  • Short sleeping duration is associated with a higher risk of asymmetric handgrip strength among older Chinese males: a cross-sectional study evidence from the China health and retirement longitudinal study
    Yilin Wang, Mei Li, Xiaoyan Chen
    Frontiers in Public Health.2023;[Epub]     CrossRef
  • Associations of Handgrip Asymmetry With Impaired Health-Related Quality of Life Among Older Adults in South Korea: A Cross-Sectional Study Using National Survey Data
    Jihyun Baek, Yunmi Kim, Hyun-Young Kim
    Asia Pacific Journal of Public Health.2022; 34(6-7): 649.     CrossRef
  • Association between changes in handgrip strength and depression in Korean adults: a longitudinal panel study
    Hyunkyu Kim, Wonjeong Jeong, Seung Hoon Kim, Yu Shin Park, Sung-In Jang, Eun-Cheol Park
    Scientific Reports.2022;[Epub]     CrossRef
  • Muscle Strength Moderates the Relationship between Nutritional Health Risk and Depression in Korean Older Adults
    Jeonghyeon Kim, Seamon Kang, Haeryun Hong, Hyunsik Kang, Ju-Hyoung Kim, Sang-Koo Woo
    Nutrients.2022; 14(3): 665.     CrossRef
  • Depressive symptoms and physical function among the elderly in nursing homes during the COVID-19 pandemic in China: A cross-sectional study
    Lunan Gao, Jinhong Yang, Jiang Liu, Tingting Xin, Yuxiu Liu
    Medicine.2022; 101(47): e31929.     CrossRef
  • Association between handgrip strength asymmetry and falls in elderly Koreans: A nationwide population-based cross-sectional study
    Young Joo Go, Duk Chul Lee, Hye Jun Lee
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Effects of Income Level on the Association Between Hypertension and Depression: 2010-2017 Korea National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey
San Kang, Hyeon Chang Kim
J Prev Med Public Health. 2020;53(6):439-446.   Published online October 8, 2020
DOI: https://doi.org/10.3961/jpmph.20.337
  • 3,687 View
  • 139 Download
  • 3 Crossref
AbstractAbstract PDFSupplementary Material
Objectives
This study analyzed the associations of hypertension (HTN) with symptoms and diagnosis of depression by income level among Korean adults.
Methods
This study was based on the 2010-2017 Korea National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey data; a total of 29 425 adults (aged 20 years or older) were analyzed. HTN was defined as a systolic blood pressure ≥140 mmHg, diastolic blood pressure ≥90 mmHg, or use of hypertensive medications. Depression symptoms were evaluated based on a questionnaire about depression-related symptoms. A depression diagnosis was defined based on questionnaire responses indicating that a participant had been diagnosed with depression. Household income was divided into higher or lower income ranges based on the median income of the participants. Multiple logistic regression analyses were performed to assess the associations between HTN and depression symptoms/diagnosis in the higher-income and lower-income groups.
Results
In the higher-income group, the odds ratio (OR) for the association between HTN and depression symptoms was 1.15 (95% confidence interval [CI], 0.97 to 1.37), and the OR for the association between HTN and depression diagnosis was 1.41 (95% CI, 1.13 to 1.76). In the lower-income group, the OR for the association between HTN and depression symptoms was 1.18 (95% CI, 1.04 to 1.34), whereas the OR for the association between HTN and depression diagnosis was 0.82 (95% CI, 0.70 to 0.97).
Conclusions
The associations of HTN with symptoms and diagnosis of depression differed by income level.
Summary

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  • Impacts of Anxiety and Depression on Clinical Hypertension in Low-Income US Adults
    Rohan M. Shah, Sahil Doshi, Sareena Shah, Shiv Patel, Angela Li, Joseph A. Diamond
    High Blood Pressure & Cardiovascular Prevention.2023; 30(4): 337.     CrossRef
  • Machine learning-based predictive modeling of depression in hypertensive populations
    Chiyoung Lee, Heewon Kim, Gennady S. Cymbalyuk
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  • The Association between Plasma Concentration of Phytoestrogens and Hypertension within the Korean Multicenter Cancer Cohort
    Juyeon Lee, Ju-Young Kang, Kwang-Pil Ko, Sue-Kyung Park
    Nutrients.2021; 13(12): 4366.     CrossRef
The Association Between the Basic Old-Age Pension and Depression of the Older Adults in Korea
Jaewon Kim, Tae-Jin Lee, Cheong-Seok Kim
J Prev Med Public Health. 2020;53(5):332-341.   Published online July 13, 2020
DOI: https://doi.org/10.3961/jpmph.20.024
  • 7,664 View
  • 217 Download
  • 2 Crossref
AbstractAbstract PDFSupplementary Material
Objectives
The purpose of this study was to investigate the association between the Basic Old-Age Pension (BOP), which is a noncontributory pension, and depression in BOP beneficiaries in Korea.
Methods
We used the second and third waves (2007-2008) of the Korea Welfare Panel Study to identify the effect of the BOP on mental health in the year of its introduction. The Center for Epidemiological Studies-Depression Scale, applied in a Korean context, was used to evaluate mental health. To analyze the effect of the BOP, a difference-in-difference approach was used in analyses of all subjects and subgroups.
Results
For this study population of 760 adults, the BOP did not have a statistically significant relationship with depression in its beneficiaries. After controlling for type of household, the BOP was still not associated with lower reporting of depression, either in singlebeneficiary or double-beneficiary households, in the year of the benefit.
Conclusions
The BOP policy had no significant relationship with the level of depression among recipients. However, this should not be interpreted as implying that income subsidy programs for older adults, such as the BOP, do not affect mental health, considering the importance of economic hardship in this population and the program’s socioeconomic effects.
Summary

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  • Factors Associated with Aging in Place among Community-Dwelling Older Adults in Korea: Findings from a National Survey
    Myong Sun Cho, Mi Young Kwon
    International Journal of Environmental Research and Public Health.2023; 20(3): 2740.     CrossRef
  • Comparing the mental health effects of different social assistance programmes in Hong Kong
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    Journal of Asian Public Policy.2022; : 1.     CrossRef
Perceived Discrimination, Depression, and the Role of Perceived Social Support as an Effect Modifier in Korean Young Adults
Kwanghyun Kim, Sun Jae Jung, So Mi Jemma Cho, Ji Hye Park, Hyeon Chang Kim
J Prev Med Public Health. 2019;52(6):366-376.   Published online October 24, 2019
DOI: https://doi.org/10.3961/jpmph.19.114
  • 6,513 View
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  • 7 Crossref
AbstractAbstract AbstractSummary PDFSupplementary Material
Objectives
The relationships among discrimination, social support, and mental health have mostly been studied in minorities, and relevant studies in the general population are lacking. We aimed to investigate associations between discrimination and depressive symptoms in Korean non-minority young adults, considering the role of social support.
Methods
In total, 372 participants who completed the psychological examinations conducted in the third wave of the Jangseong High School Cohort study were included. We used the Everyday Discrimination Scale to evaluate perceived discrimination and the Beck Depression Inventory-II to measure depressive symptoms. Social support was measured by the Multidimensional Scale of Perceived Social Support. Multivariate linear regression was conducted to investigate associations between discrimination and depression, along with the effect modification of social support. We stratified the population by gender to investigate gender differences.
Results
Perceived discrimination was significantly associated with depressive symptoms (β=0.736, p<0.001), and social support was negatively associated with depression (β=-0.245, p<0.001). In men, support from friends was the most influential factor (β=-0.631, p=0.011), but no significant effect modification was found. In women, support from family was the most influential factor (β=-0.440, p=0.010), and women with higher familial support showed a significantly diminished association between discrimination and depression, unlike those with lower family support.
Conclusions
Discrimination perceived by individuals can lead to depressive symptoms in Korean young adults, and this relationship can may differ by gender and social support status.
Summary
Korean summary
본 연구에서는 한국인에서 차별이 우울 증상에 미치는 영향을 평가하고 사회적 지지가 차별의 건강영향을 조절하는지 확인하고자 하였다. 인지된 차별은 우울 증상과 양의 상관관계를 보였으며, 높은 사회적 지지는 차별의 부정적 건강 영향을 경감시키는 효과를 보였다. 남성에서는 친구로부터의 사회적 지지가 가장 강한 영향력을 나타냈으며, 여성에서는 가족으로부터의 사회적 지지가 가장 강한 효과를 보였다.

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    Ningning Feng, Zhaoyang Xie, Yuqi Li, Can Yang, Lijuan Cui
    Current Psychology.2024; 43(7): 6271.     CrossRef
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    Xiaoling Liu, Huijun Li, Siyuan Zeng, Xiaofeng Luo
    Current Psychology.2024; 43(10): 8788.     CrossRef
  • Impact of Perceived Social Support and Depression in Married Turkish Women on the Sexual Quality of Life: An Online Survey
    Ç. Gök, U Yücel, YÇ Okuyan, ZB Akmeşe
    Nigerian Journal of Clinical Practice.2023; 26(11): 1667.     CrossRef
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    Frontiers in Psychology.2021;[Epub]     CrossRef
  • Testing whether implicit emotion regulation mediates the association between discrimination and symptoms of psychopathology in late childhood: An RDoC perspective
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Transformational Leadership and Depressive Symptoms in Germany: Validation of a Short Transformational Leadership Scale
Max Leonhard Seegel, Raphael M. Herr, Michael Schneider, Burkhard Schmidt, Joachim E. Fischer
J Prev Med Public Health. 2019;52(3):161-169.   Published online May 12, 2019
DOI: https://doi.org/10.3961/jpmph.19.002
  • 4,986 View
  • 142 Download
AbstractAbstract PDF
Objectives
The objective of the present study was to validate a shortened transformational leadership (TL) scale (12 items) comprising core TL behaviour and to test the associations of this shortened TL scale with depressive symptoms.
Methods
The study used cross-sectional data from 1632 employees of the overall workforce of a middle-sized German company (51.6% men; mean age, 41.35 years; standard deviation, 9.4 years). TL was assessed with the German version of the Transformational Leadership Inventory and depressive symptoms with the Hospital Anxiety and Depression Scale (HADS). The structural validity of the core TL scale was assessed with confirmatory factor analysis. Associations with depressive symptoms were estimated with structural equation modelling and adjusted logistic regression.
Results
Confirmatory factor analysis and structural equation modelling showed better model fit for the core TL than for the full TL score. Logistic regression revealed 3.61-fold (95% confidence interval [CI], 2.20 to 5.93: women) to 4.46-fold (95% CI, 2.86 to 6.95: men) increased odds of reporting depressive symptoms (HADS score >8) for those in the lowest tertile of reported core TL.
Conclusions
The shortened core TL seems to be a valid instrument for research and training purposes in the context of TL and depressive symptoms in employees. Of particular note, men reporting poor TL were more likely to report depressive symptoms.
Summary
Family Members of Cancer Patients in Korea Are at an Increased Risk of Medically Diagnosed Depression
Youngdae Cho, Yongwoo Jeon, Sung-In Jang, Eun-Cheol Park
J Prev Med Public Health. 2018;51(2):100-108.   Published online February 19, 2018
DOI: https://doi.org/10.3961/jpmph.17.166
  • 6,429 View
  • 220 Download
  • 9 Crossref
AbstractAbstract PDFSupplementary Material
Objectives
Family members are often cancer patients’ primary source of social and emotional support and make a major contribution to how well patients manage their illness. We compared the prevalence of depression in the family members of cancer patients and the general population. Methods: This study used the data from the fourth, fifth, and sixth rounds of the Korea National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey. The variable of interest was the presence of a cohabitating cancer patient in the family and the dependent variable was the presence of diagnosed depression. Results: The odds of having medically diagnosed depression in those with a cohabitating cancer patient in the family were significantly higher than among those who did not have cancer patients in their families (odds ratio [OR], 1.56; 95% confidence interval [CI], 1.12 to 2.17; p=0.009). The OR for females was 1.59, and this increase was statistically significant (95% CI, 1.09 to 2.31; p=0.02). Conclusions: We need to invest more effort into diagnosing and managing depression in the family members of cancer patients. This will have an impact both on their quality of life and on the well-being of patients, as supporters and caregivers play an instrumental role in helping patients manage their illness.
Summary

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    Mercedes Guilabert, Paloma Amil, Asunción González-Mestre, Esther Gil-Sánchez, Anna Vila, Joan Contel, Juan Ansotegui, Olga Solas, Ma Bacigalupe, Paloma Fernández-Cano, Marisa Arteagoitia, José Mira
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JPMPH : Journal of Preventive Medicine and Public Health