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Systematic Review
Low Social Support and Risk for Depression in People With Type 2 Diabetes Mellitus: A Systematic Review and Meta-analysis
Akhmad Azmiardi, Bhisma Murti, Ratih Puspita Febrinasari, Didik Gunawan Tamtomo
J Prev Med Public Health. 2022;55(1):37-48.   Published online January 10, 2022
DOI: https://doi.org/10.3961/jpmph.21.490
  • 4,337 View
  • 188 Download
  • 8 Web of Science
  • 10 Crossref
AbstractAbstract PDF
Objectives
Depression is a frequent complication of type 2 diabetes mellitus. This study aimed to investigate the relationship between low social support and risk for depression in people with type 2 diabetes through a meta-analysis.
Methods
PubMed, ProQuest, SpringerLink, ScienceDirect, Scopus, the Cochrane Library, Embase, and Google Scholar were searched for English-language articles published up to 2021. Pooled adjusted odds ratios (aORs) were calculated using a random-effect model with 95% confidence intervals (CIs). Heterogeneity was evaluated by using the Cochrane Q test and I2 statistics. The risk of publication bias was estimated using a funnel plot, the Egger test, and the Begg test. The Joanna Briggs Institute Critical Appraisal Tools were used to assess the quality of evidence and the risk of bias.
Results
Eleven studies were included in this meta-analysis, containing a total of 3151 people with type 2 diabetes mellitus. The pooled analysis showed that people with type 2 diabetes mellitus who had low social support had twice as high a risk of depression as those with high social support (aOR, 2.02; 95% CI, 1.51 to 2.70; p<0.001). A random-effect model was used because the heterogeneity was high (I2= 87%).
Conclusions
Low social support was found to increase the risk of depression among people with type 2 diabetes mellitus. Further investigation into factors that may moderate this relationship is required.
Summary

Citations

Citations to this article as recorded by  
  • Staying connected: An umbrella review of meta-analyses on the push-and-pull of social connection in depression
    Luisa De Risio, Mauro Pettorruso, Rebecca Collevecchio, Barbara Collacchi, Marta Boffa, Mario Santorelli, Massimo Clerici, Giovanni Martinotti, Francesca Zoratto, Marta Borgi
    Journal of Affective Disorders.2024; 345: 358.     CrossRef
  • The risk factors for mental health disorders in patients with type 2 diabetes: An umbrella review of systematic reviews with and without meta-analysis
    Amani Busili, Kanta Kumar, Laura Kudrna, Idris Busaily
    Heliyon.2024; 10(7): e28782.     CrossRef
  • Effectiveness of social support-based interventions in preventing depression in people without clinical depression: A systematic review and meta-analysis of randomized controlled trials
    Henar Campos-Paíno, Patricia Moreno-Peral, Irene Gómez-Gómez, Sonia Conejo-Cerón, Santiago Galán, Sara Reyes-Martín, Juan Ángel Bellón
    International Journal of Social Psychiatry.2023; 69(2): 253.     CrossRef
  • Individuelle Behandlung bei Glaukompatienten mit einem Diabetes mellitus
    Jan Luebke
    Klinische Monatsblätter für Augenheilkunde.2023; 240(02): 142.     CrossRef
  • Prevalence of comorbid depression and associated factors among hospitalized patients with type 2 diabetes mellitus in Hunan, China
    Rehanguli Maimaitituerxun, Wenhang Chen, Jingsha Xiang, Atipatsa C. Kaminga, Xin Yin Wu, Letao Chen, Jianzhou Yang, Aizhong Liu, Wenjie Dai
    BMC Psychiatry.2023;[Epub]     CrossRef
  • The prevalence and predictors of depression and disability in older adults and elderly patients with Diabetes in India: Cross-sectional analysis from the Longitudinal Study on Ageing
    Baani Sodhi, Mansi Malik, Paras Agarwal, Saurav Basu
    Diabetes & Metabolic Syndrome: Clinical Research & Reviews.2023; 17(4): 102765.     CrossRef
  • Depression and determinants among diabetes mellitus patients in Ethiopia, a systematic review and meta-analysis
    Kirubel Dagnaw Tegegne, Natnael Atnafu Gebeyehu, Mesfin Wudu Kassaw
    BMC Psychiatry.2023;[Epub]     CrossRef
  • Individuelle Behandlung bei Glaukompatienten mit einem Diabetes mellitus
    Jan Lübke
    Diabetes aktuell.2023; 21(02): 68.     CrossRef
  • Diabetes and Mental Health
    David J. Robinson, Kimberley Hanson, Akshay B. Jain, Jessica C. Kichler, Gaurav Mehta, Osnat C. Melamed, Michael Vallis, Harpreet S. Bajaj, Tracy Barnes, Jeremy Gilbert, Kristin Honshorst, Robyn Houlden, James Kim, Joanne Lewis, Barbara MacDonald, Dylan M
    Canadian Journal of Diabetes.2023; 47(4): 308.     CrossRef
  • The association between screen time and depression symptoms severity among adults with diabetes: A cross-sectional study
    Layan Sukik, Bushra Hoque, Linda Boutefnouchet, Mohamed Elhadary, Hiba Bawadi, Mujahed Shraim
    Primary Care Diabetes.2023; 17(6): 619.     CrossRef
Original Articles
Perceived Discrimination, Depression, and the Role of Perceived Social Support as an Effect Modifier in Korean Young Adults
Kwanghyun Kim, Sun Jae Jung, So Mi Jemma Cho, Ji Hye Park, Hyeon Chang Kim
J Prev Med Public Health. 2019;52(6):366-376.   Published online October 24, 2019
DOI: https://doi.org/10.3961/jpmph.19.114
  • 6,513 View
  • 175 Download
  • 7 Crossref
AbstractAbstract AbstractSummary PDFSupplementary Material
Objectives
The relationships among discrimination, social support, and mental health have mostly been studied in minorities, and relevant studies in the general population are lacking. We aimed to investigate associations between discrimination and depressive symptoms in Korean non-minority young adults, considering the role of social support.
Methods
In total, 372 participants who completed the psychological examinations conducted in the third wave of the Jangseong High School Cohort study were included. We used the Everyday Discrimination Scale to evaluate perceived discrimination and the Beck Depression Inventory-II to measure depressive symptoms. Social support was measured by the Multidimensional Scale of Perceived Social Support. Multivariate linear regression was conducted to investigate associations between discrimination and depression, along with the effect modification of social support. We stratified the population by gender to investigate gender differences.
Results
Perceived discrimination was significantly associated with depressive symptoms (β=0.736, p<0.001), and social support was negatively associated with depression (β=-0.245, p<0.001). In men, support from friends was the most influential factor (β=-0.631, p=0.011), but no significant effect modification was found. In women, support from family was the most influential factor (β=-0.440, p=0.010), and women with higher familial support showed a significantly diminished association between discrimination and depression, unlike those with lower family support.
Conclusions
Discrimination perceived by individuals can lead to depressive symptoms in Korean young adults, and this relationship can may differ by gender and social support status.
Summary
Korean summary
본 연구에서는 한국인에서 차별이 우울 증상에 미치는 영향을 평가하고 사회적 지지가 차별의 건강영향을 조절하는지 확인하고자 하였다. 인지된 차별은 우울 증상과 양의 상관관계를 보였으며, 높은 사회적 지지는 차별의 부정적 건강 영향을 경감시키는 효과를 보였다. 남성에서는 친구로부터의 사회적 지지가 가장 강한 영향력을 나타냈으며, 여성에서는 가족으로부터의 사회적 지지가 가장 강한 효과를 보였다.

Citations

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  • The relationship between stressful childhood environments and depression for Chinese adolescents: a serial mediation model through perceived discrimination and belief in a just world
    Ningning Feng, Zhaoyang Xie, Yuqi Li, Can Yang, Lijuan Cui
    Current Psychology.2024; 43(7): 6271.     CrossRef
  • Social support and cigarette smoking among homosexual college students in China: a moderated mediation model examining the roles of depression and disclosure
    Xiaoling Liu, Huijun Li, Siyuan Zeng, Xiaofeng Luo
    Current Psychology.2024; 43(10): 8788.     CrossRef
  • Impact of Perceived Social Support and Depression in Married Turkish Women on the Sexual Quality of Life: An Online Survey
    Ç. Gök, U Yücel, YÇ Okuyan, ZB Akmeşe
    Nigerian Journal of Clinical Practice.2023; 26(11): 1667.     CrossRef
  • Gender Differences in the Development of Posttraumatic Stress Symptoms Following Pregnancy Loss: Social Support and Causal Attributes
    Sigal Levy, Ronit Avitsur
    Psychological Studies.2022; 67(4): 524.     CrossRef
  • Effects of Wise Intervention on Perceived Discrimination Among College Students Returning Home From Wuhan During the COVID-19 Outbreak
    Ting Lu, Zihan Guo, Hao Li, Xinyu Zhang, Zhihong Ren, Weiping Yang, Liuqing Wei, Ling Huang
    Frontiers in Psychology.2021;[Epub]     CrossRef
  • Testing whether implicit emotion regulation mediates the association between discrimination and symptoms of psychopathology in late childhood: An RDoC perspective
    T.G. Vargas, V.A. Mittal
    Development and Psychopathology.2021; 33(5): 1634.     CrossRef
  • Physical Fitness and Somatic Characteristics of the Only Child
    Luis P. Rodrigues, Ricardo Franco Lima, Ana Filipa Silva, Filipe Manuel Clemente, Miguel Camões, Pantelis Theodoros Nikolaidis, Thomas Rosemann, Beat Knechtle
    Frontiers in Pediatrics.2020;[Epub]     CrossRef
Factors Affecting Breast Self-examination Behavior Among Female Healthcare Workers in Iran: The Role of Social Support Theory
saeed bashirian, Majid Barati, Leila Moaddab Shoar, Younes Mohammadi, Mitra Dogonchi
J Prev Med Public Health. 2019;52(4):224-233.   Published online June 26, 2019
DOI: https://doi.org/10.3961/jpmph.18.277
  • 7,871 View
  • 337 Download
  • 10 Crossref
AbstractAbstract PDFSupplementary Material
Objectives
In women, breast cancer is the most common cancer and the leading cause of cancer death. Screening tests are the basis for early diagnosis. In Iranian women, the mortality rate of breast cancer is high due to insufficient screening examinations and delayed visits for care. Therefore, this study aimed to determine the factors affecting breast self-examinations among Iranian women employed in medical careers.
Methods
This cross-sectional study included 501 women working in the medical professions at Hamadan University of Medical Sciences in western Iran in 2018. The subjects were selected by stratified random sampling. Data were collected using a researcher-developed, self-report questionnaire that contained demographic information and questions based on protection motivation theory and social support theory. Descriptive data analysis was conducted using SPSS version 23 and model fitting with PLS version 2.
Results
The mean age of the participants was 37.1±8.3 years, and most of the women (80.4%) were married. Most women had a bachelor’s degree (67.5%). The findings of this study showed that the coping appraisal construct was a predictor of protection motivation (β=0.380, p<0.05), and protection motivation (β=0.604, p<0.05) was a predictor of breast self-examination behavior. Additionally, social support theory (β=0.202, p<0.05) had a significant positive effect on breast self-examination behavior.
Conclusions
The frequency of practicing self-examinations among women employees in the medical sector was low; considering the influence of social support as a factor promoting screening, it is necessary to pay attention to influential people in women’s lives when designing educational interventions.
Summary

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    Ningning Lu, Chi Zhang, Hua You, Zhuyue Ma, Ping Zhu, Fang Cheng
    Cancer Nursing.2024;[Epub]     CrossRef
  • A concept analysis: Support for lay healthcare workers in HIV services, Bojanala District, North West
    Sarah B. Pitse, Patrone R. Risenga
    Curationis.2023;[Epub]     CrossRef
  • The Sociocultural Influences on Breast Cancer Screening among Rural African Women in South Africa
    Nelisha Sarmah, Maureen Nokuthula Sibiya, Thandokuhle Emmanuel Khoza
    International Journal of Environmental Research and Public Health.2023; 20(21): 7005.     CrossRef
  • The practice of breast self-examination and associated factors among female healthcare professionals working in selected hospitals in Kigali, Rwanda: a cross sectional study
    Mulugeta Tenna Wolde, Rosemary Okova, Michael Habtu, Mekitie Wondafrash, Abebe Bekele
    BMC Women's Health.2023;[Epub]     CrossRef
  • Predicting preventive travel behaviors under the COVID-19 pandemic through an integration of Health Belief Model and Value-Belief-Norm
    Namhyun Kim, SoJung Lee, Choong-Ki Lee, Courtney Suess
    Tourism Management Perspectives.2022; 43: 100981.     CrossRef
  • Structural equation modeling to detect predictors of breast self‐examination behavior: Implications for intervention planning
    Nianting Ju, Shengkai Liao, Suge Zheng, Tiantian Hua, Shunhua Zhang
    Journal of Obstetrics and Gynaecology Research.2021; 47(2): 583.     CrossRef
  • Knowledge and Practice on Breast Self-Examination and Associated Factors among Summer Class Social Science Undergraduate Female Students in the University of Gondar, Northwest Ethiopia
    Muhabaw Shumye Mihret, Temesgen Worku Gudayu, Abera Shiferaw Abebe, Emebet Gebru Tarekegn, Solomon Ketemaw Abebe, Mosina Aminu Abduselam, Tejitu Dereje Shiferaw, Genet Worku Kebede, Samuel Antwi
    Journal of Cancer Epidemiology.2021; 2021: 1.     CrossRef
  • Knowledge and Practice of Breast Cancer Screening Methods among Female Community Pharmacists in Jordan: A Cross-Sectional Study
    Nehad M. Ayoub, Ghaith M. Al-Taani, Basima A. Almomani, Linda Tahaineh, Khawla Nuseir, Areej Othman, Kofi Boamah Mensah, Pranshu Sahgal
    International Journal of Breast Cancer.2021; 2021: 1.     CrossRef
  • Determinants of Intention to Participate in Breast Cancer Screening among Urban Chinese Women: An Application of the Protection Motivation Theory
    Miao Zhang, Wenshuang Wei, Qinmei Li, Xinguang Chen, Min Zhang, Dan Zuo, Qing Liu
    International Journal of Environmental Research and Public Health.2021; 18(21): 11093.     CrossRef
  • Impact of Social Support and Social Trust on Public Viral Risk Response: A COVID-19 Survey Study
    Eugene Song, Hyun Jung Yoo
    International Journal of Environmental Research and Public Health.2020; 17(18): 6589.     CrossRef
Factors Predicting the Physical Activity Behavior of Female Adolescents: A Test of the Health Promotion Model
Hashem Mohamadian, Mohammad Ghannaee Arani
J Prev Med Public Health. 2014;47(1):64-71.   Published online January 29, 2014
DOI: https://doi.org/10.3961/jpmph.2014.47.1.64
  • 13,288 View
  • 188 Download
  • 7 Crossref
AbstractAbstract PDF
Objectives

Physical activity behavior begins to decline during adolescence and continues to decrease throughout young adulthood. This study aims to explain factors that influence physical activity behavior in a sample of female adolescents using a health promotion model framework.

Methods

This cross-sectional survey was used to explore physical activity behavior among a sample of female adolescents. Participants completed measures of physical activity, perceived self-efficacy, self-esteem, social support, perceived barriers, and perceived affect. Interactions among the variables were examined using path analysis within a covariance modeling framework.

Results

The final model accounted for an R2 value of 0.52 for physical activity and offered a good model-data fit. The results indicated that physical activity was predicted by self-esteem (β=0.46, p<0.001), perceived self-efficacy (β=0.40, p<0.001), social support (β=0.24, p<0.001), perceived barriers (β=-0.19, p<0.001), and perceived affect (β=0.17, p<0.001).

Conclusions

The findings of this study showed that the health promotion model was useful to predict physical activity behavior among the Iranian female adolescents. Information related to the predictors of physical activity behavior will help researchers plan more tailored culturally relevant health promotion interventions for this population.

Summary

Citations

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  • A meta-analysis of the relationship between social support and physical activity in adolescents: the mediating role of self-efficacy
    Hao Lin, Haidong Chen, Qingzao Liu, Jie Xu, Shan Li
    Frontiers in Psychology.2024;[Epub]     CrossRef
  • Modelo de Nola Pender para promoção da saúde do adolescente
    Daniela Bulcão Santi, Iara Sescon Nogueira, Vanessa Denardi Antoniassi Baldissera
    REME-Revista Mineira de Enfermagem.2023;[Epub]     CrossRef
  • Evaluation of Physical Activity and its Effective Factors in Junior High School Female Students in Rafsanjan City: Application of Social-cognitive Theory, 2017-18
    Zahra Soleiman Ahari, Mohammad Asadpour, Leili Mazar, Mostafa Nasirzadeh
    Qom Univ Med Sci J.2021; 15(3): 188.     CrossRef
  • Predicting physical activity among urban adolescent girls: A test of the health promotion model
    Vicki R. Voskuil, Lorraine B. Robbins, Steven J. Pierce
    Research in Nursing & Health.2019; 42(5): 392.     CrossRef
  • Health behaviours in emerging adulthood: Their relationship with perceived maternal and paternal parental attitudes and the mediating role of self-efficacy
    Anna Maria Jankowska, Marta Łockiewicz, Dorota Dykalska-Bieck, Ariadna Łada, Weronika Owoc, Dawid Stańczykowski
    Health Psychology Report.2017; 6(1): 94.     CrossRef
  • The relationship between self-esteem and overall health behaviors in Korean adolescents
    Junghyun Park, Young-Ho Kim, Seon-Joo Park, Sooyeon Suh, Hae-Jeung Lee
    Health Psychology and Behavioral Medicine.2016; 4(1): 175.     CrossRef
  • Should Schools Send BMI Report Cards to Parents? A Review of Literature
    Alexander Henningsen, Piroska Boros, Kent Ingvalson, Fabio E. Fontana, Oksana Matvienko
    Journal of Physical Education, Recreation & Dance.2015; 86(9): 26.     CrossRef
Social Network Characteristics and Body Mass Index in an Elderly Korean Population
Won Joon Lee, Yoosik Youm, Yumie Rhee, Yeong-Ran Park, Sang Hui Chu, Hyeon Chang Kim
J Prev Med Public Health. 2013;46(6):336-345.   Published online November 28, 2013
DOI: https://doi.org/10.3961/jpmph.2013.46.6.336
  • 10,121 View
  • 103 Download
  • 17 Crossref
AbstractAbstract PDF
Objectives

Research has shown that obesity appears to spread through social ties. However, the association between other characteristics of social networks and obesity is unclear. This study aimed to identify the association between social network characteristics and body mass index (BMI, kg/m2) in an elderly Korean population.

Methods

This cross-sectional study analyzed data from 657 Koreans (273 men, 384 women) aged 60 years or older who participated in the Korean Social Life, Health, and Aging Project. Network size is a count of the number of friends. Density of communication network is the number of connections in the social network reported as a fraction of the total links possible in the personal (ego-centric) network. Average frequency of communication (or meeting) measures how often network members communicate (or meet) each other. The association of each social network measure with BMI was investigated by multiple linear regression analysis.

Results

After adjusting for potential confounders, the men with lower density (<0.71) and higher network size (4-6) had the higher BMI (β=1.089, p=0.037) compared to the men with higher density (>0.83) and lower size (1-2), but not in the women (p=0.393). The lowest tertile of communication frequency was associated with higher BMI in the women (β=0.885, p=0.049), but not in the men (p=0.140).

Conclusions

Our study suggests that social network structure (network size and density) and activation (communication frequency and meeting frequency) are associated with obesity among the elderly. There may also be gender differences in this association.

Summary

Citations

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  • A Prospective Sociocentric Study of 2 Entire Traditional Korean Villages: The Korean Social Life, Health, and Aging Project (KSHAP)
    Jiwon Baek, Ekaterina Baldina, Kiho Sung, Sung-Ha Lee, Nicholas A Christakis, Peter Bearman, Hyeon Chang Kim, Sang Hui Chu, Eun Lee, Yeong-Ran Park, Jeanyung Chey, Youn-Hee Choi, Dohoon Lee, Yoosik Youm
    American Journal of Epidemiology.2024; 193(2): 241.     CrossRef
  • The Early-Life Origins of Later-Life Networks
    Alyssa W Goldman
    Social Problems.2022; 69(2): 562.     CrossRef
  • 20-55 Yaş Arası Kadınların Beden Algılarının Değerlendirilmesi
    Can ERGÜN, Bilge MERAL KOC, Selin KALEOĞLU
    İstanbul Gelişim Üniversitesi Sağlık Bilimleri Dergisi.2022; (18): 892.     CrossRef
  • Social connections and hypertension in women and men: a population-based cross-sectional study of the Canadian Longitudinal Study on Aging
    Zeinab Hosseini, Gerry Veenstra, Nadia A. Khan, Annalijn I. Conklin
    Journal of Hypertension.2021; 39(4): 651.     CrossRef
  • Adiposity and the role of diverse social supports: an observational, gender-sensitive study using the baseline Canadian Longitudinal Study on Aging
    Zeinab Hosseini, Abdollah Safari, Nadia A Khan, Gerry Veenstra, Annalijn I Conklin
    Public Health Nutrition.2021; 24(18): 6103.     CrossRef
  • Associations between social connections, their interactions, and obesity differ by gender: A population-based, cross-sectional analysis of the Canadian Longitudinal Study on Aging
    Zeinab Hosseini, Gerry Veenstra, Nadia A. Khan, Annalijn I. Conklin, Liang Wang
    PLOS ONE.2020; 15(7): e0235977.     CrossRef
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    Stephanie T Child, Katrina M Walsemann, Andrew T Kaczynski, Nancy L Fleischer, Alexander C McLain, Spencer Moore
    Journal of Public Health.2019; 41(1): 130.     CrossRef
  • Social support, social network and salt-reduction behaviours in children: a substudy of the School-EduSalt trial
    Yuan Ma, Xiangxian Feng, Jun Ma, Feng J He, Haijun Wang, Jing Zhang, Wuxiang Xie, Tao Wu, Yunjian Yin, Jianhui Yuan, Graham A MacGregor, Yangfeng Wu
    BMJ Open.2019; 9(6): e028126.     CrossRef
  • Is the Relationship between Depression and C Reactive Protein Level Moderated by Social Support in Elderly?-Korean Social Life, Health, and Aging Project (KSHAP)
    Nam Wook Hur, Hyeon Chang Kim, Linda Waite, Yoosik Youm
    Psychiatry Investigation.2018; 15(1): 24.     CrossRef
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    S. Zhang, K. de la Haye, M. Ji, R. An
    Obesity Reviews.2018; 19(7): 976.     CrossRef
  • Social Network Analysis and Resilience in University Students: An Approach from Cohesiveness
    Cristina Liébana-Presa, Elena Andina-Díaz, María-Mercedes Reguera-García, Iván Fulgueiras-Carril, David Bermejo-Martínez, Elena Fernández-Martínez
    International Journal of Environmental Research and Public Health.2018; 15(10): 2119.     CrossRef
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    André Hajek, Hans-Helmut König
    BMC Geriatrics.2018;[Epub]     CrossRef
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    Woo Jung Kim, Won-tak Joo, Jiwon Baek, Sung Yun Sohn, Kee Namkoong, Yoosik Youm, Hyeon Chang Kim, Yeong-Ran Park, Sang Hui Chu, Eun Lee
    Psychiatry Investigation.2017; 14(4): 400.     CrossRef
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    Jessica Martino, Jennifer Pegg, Elizabeth Pegg Frates
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    Paulo Cesar Moreira Campos, Marcia Gomide
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Psychological, Social, and Environmental Factors Associated With Utilization of Senior Centers Among Older Adults in Korea
Hyun-Shik Kim, Masashi Miyashita, Kazuhiro Harada, Jong-Hwan Park, Jae-Moo So, Yoshio Nakamura
J Prev Med Public Health. 2012;45(4):244-250.   Published online July 31, 2012
DOI: https://doi.org/10.3961/jpmph.2012.45.4.244
  • 8,076 View
  • 86 Download
  • 3 Crossref
AbstractAbstract PDF
Objectives

The purpose of the study was to examine the relationships among the psychological, social, and environmental factors influencing the utilization of senior centers among older adults in Korea.

Methods

A questionnaire survey was administered to two types of older adults who lived in Seoul, Korea: 262 older adults who used senior centers (3 places) and 156 older adults who did not use senior centers.

Results

Our results showed clearly that the utilization of the senior centers in Korea is affected by higher self-efficacy (odds ratio [OR], 6.08; 95% confidence interval [CI], 3.31 to 12.32), higher perceived benefits (OR, 1.71; 95% CI, 1.16 to 4.36), lower perceived barriers (OR, 6.43; 95% CI, 3.07 to 11.45), higher family support (OR, 4.21; 95% CI, 2.02 to 8.77), and higher support from friends (OR, 4.08; 95% CI, 2.38 to 7.81). The results also showed that participants whose total travel time was 15 to 29 minutes (OR, 2.84; 95% CI, 1.21 to 3.64) or less than 14 minutes (OR, 4.68; 95% CI, 3.41 to 8.41) were more likely to use a senior center than those who had to travel more than 30 minutes.

Conclusions

This study showed that the utilization of senior centers in Korea is affected by psychological, social, and environmental factors, specifically by self-efficacy, perceived benefits, perceived barriers, social support, convenience of transportation, and total travel time to the senior centers. The effects of longer-term utilization of the senior centers by non-users on health-related outcomes in a large population warrant attention.

Summary

Citations

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  • Kaleidoscopic associations between life outside home and the technological environment that shape occupational injustice as revealed through cross-sectional statistical modelling
    Sarah Wallcook, Louise Nygård, Anders Kottorp, Sophie Gaber, Georgina Charlesworth, Camilla Malinowsky
    Journal of Occupational Science.2021; 28(1): 42.     CrossRef
  • How Does the Built Environment in Compact Metropolitan Cities Affect Health? A Systematic Review of Korean Studies
    Kim, Yoo
    International Journal of Environmental Research and Public Health.2019; 16(16): 2921.     CrossRef
  • Older Adults’ Social Relationships and Health Care Utilization: A Systematic Review
    Nicole K. Valtorta, Danielle Collingridge Moore, Lynn Barron, Daniel Stow, Barbara Hanratty
    American Journal of Public Health.2018; 108(4): e1.     CrossRef
Factors Related to Perceived Life Satisfaction Among the Elderly in South Korea.
Minsoo Jung, Carles Muntaner, Mankyu Choi
J Prev Med Public Health. 2010;43(4):292-300.
DOI: https://doi.org/10.3961/jpmph.2010.43.4.292
  • 5,555 View
  • 84 Download
  • 20 Crossref
AbstractAbstract PDF
OBJECTIVES
This study attempted to explore the aging phenomena that now characterize much of Korean society, and assessed issues associated with the life satisfaction experienced during the process of aging. METHODS: By employing the National Survey on the State of Life and the Desire for Welfare of the Elderly, 2004 in South Korea this study attempted to identify the factors that determine subjective life satisfaction among the elderly. The data utilized herein consisted of 3278 elderly people aged 65 years or older, from 9308 households. RESULTS: The results of analysis from the final model after the introduction of 19 variables in 8 factors showed statistically similar explanatory power in men (adj. R2=0.320) and in women (adj. R2=0.346). We found that economic condition was the most influential factor in both men (B=0.278) and women (B=0.336) except perceived health condition variables. The second most influential variable in life satisfaction was health checkups in men (B=0.128) and degree of nutritional diet in women (B=0.145). Those who had experience with chronic diseases also reported significantly lower perceived life satisfaction and this was particularly true of women. CONCLUSIONS: The aging society requires an understanding of the lives of elderly individuals. This study explored factors associated with life satisfaction in old age by using a life satisfaction model. The success of an aging society begins with an accurate understanding of the elderly, and thus political attention will need to be focused on this matter.
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English Abstract
Association of Social Support and Social Activity with Physical Functioning in Older Persons.
Kyunghye Park, Yunhwan Lee
J Prev Med Public Health. 2007;40(2):137-144.
DOI: https://doi.org/10.3961/jpmph.2007.40.2.137
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  • 11 Crossref
AbstractAbstract PDF
OBJECTIVES
According to Rowe and Kahn (1998), successful aging is the combination of a low probability of disease, high functioning, and active engagement with life. The purpose of this study was to assess the relationship between active engagement with life and functioning among the community-dwelling elderly. METHODS: Data were collected from Wave 2 of the Suwon Longitudinal Aging Study (SLAS), consisting of a sample of 645 persons aged 65 and older living in the community. A social activity checklist and social support inventory were used as measures of engagement with life, along with the Physical Functioning (PF) scale as a measure of functioning. The effects of social support and social activity on physical functioning, taking into account the covariates, were analyzed by hierarchical linear regression analysis. RESULTS: Maintenance of social activity and social support were significantly associated with higher physical function, after adjusting for sociodemographic and healthrelated covariates. Social support appeared to be more prominent than social activity in predicting physical functioning. CONCLUSIONS: Social support and social activity are potentially modifiable factors associated with physical function in older persons. Studies examining the role social engagement may play in preventing disability are warranted.
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Original Articles
Relationships of Smoking, Stress and Social Support of High School Students.
Eun Hyun Lee, Chun Ki Hong, Mi Sook Song, Soon Young Lee, Jee Yoon Kim
Korean J Prev Med. 2003;36(2):131-136.
  • 2,333 View
  • 36 Download
AbstractAbstract PDF
OBJECTIVES
The purpose of the present study was to explore a possible interaction effect of stress and social support on the smoking status and identify smoking related factors of high school students. METHODS: A cross-sectional design was used for this study. A total of 1, 251 high school students from Gyeonggi-do were selected using stratified-proportional random cluster sampling methods. The participants completed a set of questionnaires to measure their smoking status, stress, social support and sociodemographic information. The obtained data were analyzed using descriptive statistics, x2-tests and hierarchical logistic regressions. RESULTS: The interaction effect of stress and social support on smoking status was not supported. However, stress, sex, types of school, parent's smoking and friends' smoking were significantly predicted the smoking status of the high school students. CONCLUSIONS: In relation to the prevention of adolescents' smoking, it is recommended to decrease the stress levels of students, to make adolescents' parents cease smoking, and to educate adolescents on how to refuse the temptation to smoke or pressure from their smoking friend.
Summary
Social Support and Self-rated Health Status in a Low Income Neighborhood of Seoul, Korea.
Min Kyoung Lim, Myoung Hee Kim, Young Jeon Shin, Weon Seob Yoo, Bong Min Yang
Korean J Prev Med. 2003;36(1):54-62.
  • 2,974 View
  • 159 Download
AbstractAbstract PDF
OBJECTIVES
To assess the distribution of social support, and explore its effects on self-rated health status in a low income neighborhood of Seoul, Korea. METHODS: In September 2001 we conducted a survey in a low income neighborhood of Seoul, Korea, in which 862 residents, aged 18 years or over, participated. We measured the general sociodemographic characteristics, self-rated health status and social support with the instrument developed from Korean translation of the Medical Outcomes Study Social Support Survey (MOS-SSS) scale of the US. Logistic regression was used to identify the determinants of social support, and explore its effects on self-rated health status. RESULTS: Lower social class, women or divorced people had much less social support compared to higher social class, men or those never married, respectively. Those families on much lower income also received less social support. Social support has a positive impact on the self-rated health status, which remains statistically significant even when other relevant variables are adjusted. CONCLUSIONS: This study suggests that social support has an important role in health, and the socially disadvantaged have lower social support. Therefore, to improve the health status of the poor, it is necessary to encourage community participation, and develop strategies that could strengthen their provision of social support.
Summary
The Effect of Social Support on Chronic Stress and Immune System in Male Manufacturing Workers.
Sei Jin Chang, Sang Baek Koh, Jong Ku Park, Bong Suk Cha
Korean J Prev Med. 2002;35(4):287-294.
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OBJECTIVES
To examine whether cumulative chronic stress influences the immune status, and to verify the effect of social support on the relationship between these two dimensions in male manufacturing workers. METHODS: A total of 39 workers were recruited for this study. A structured-questionnaire was used to assess general characteristics, job characteristics (work demand and decision latitude), psychosocial distress, and social support. The serum levels of CD4 and CD8 were measured as immune markers, and were collected between 8:00 and 10:00am in order to standardize the markers. Nonparametric statistics were used to estimate the differences between job characteristics and the immune markers. RESUJLTS: General characteristics, and health-related behaviors, were not associated with CD4, CD8 or CD4/CD8. No relationships were found between job characteristics and the mean levels of immune reactivity. These results were consistent, even after controlling for social support. Social support failed to modify the relationship toward work demand, decision latitude or psychosocial distress to CD4, CD8, and CD4/CD8. CONCLUSION: Cumulative chronic life stress might not influence the immune status, and the effects of social support on the immune function under chronic stress, may not play a crucial role in modifying the relationships. This implication supports that the effect of stress on the immune function may be determined by the characteristics of that stress. Further research should effectively considers the type, magnitude and timing of a stress event, and modifiable factors, such as personality traits, coping style, and hormone excretion levels, on the alteration of immune status.
Summary
Association of Blood Pressure with the Social Support of Some Rural Residents.
So Yeon Ryu, Chul Gab Lee, Jong Park, Ki Soon Kim
Korean J Prev Med. 2001;34(4):437-443.
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OBJECTIVES
This study was performed to assess the association between the social support and blood pressure(BP) in a rural community. METHODS: A cross-sectional survey, comprising a health examination including BP, height and weight and a questionnaire-based interview which investigated social support, demographic factors, smoking, drinking, and etc. was performed between February 10th and March 5th, 1998. The survey included 318 persons who were over than 30-year-old in the rural community of Kwangju, Republic of Korea. We excluded persons who taking antihypertensive medications or who provided incomplete information; we subsequently analyzed the data from 284 persons. In order to test the hypothesis of an association between BP and social support controlling confounders such as age, educational level, working time, body mass index, smoking and drinking, the data was analyzed using multiple linear regression analysis. RESULTS: The subjects were composed of 109(38.4%) males and 175(61.6%) females with mean ages of 62.0 years and 61.1 years, respectively. The hypertension prevalence was 41.3% among males and 45.1% among females. In the correlation analysis, higher total social support scores correlated significantly with lower systolic BP in both males and females. The hypertension prevalence increased significantly with the decreasing of the social support in males. In multiple regression analysis, systolic and diastolic blood pressure showed a negative association with social support in both males and females, although this was not statistically significant. CONCLUSIONS: Larger and broader studies are required in the future in order to identify the association between the social support and BP.
Summary
Effects of Job Strains on Absenteeism from Work.
Bong Suk Cha, Sang Baek Koh, Sei Jin Chang, Hong Ryul Choi, Hyong Sik Kim
Korean J Prev Med. 1999;32(4):505-512.
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OBJECTIVES
The purpose of this study was to assess the relationship between job strains and absenteeism from work. METHODS: The study design was cross-sectional, and the study subjects consisted of 1,166 workers who were employed in the small-sized industries. A self administered questionnaire was used to measure the general characteristics, job characteristics(job demand, job control), and social support(coworker support, supervisor support) at work. The Job Content Questionnaire(JCQ) was used to assess job demand(2 items) and decision lattitude(10 items). Social support at work (10 items) was measured using JCQ. Sick absence was collected using self-report and were rechecked by the attendance record of their company. Odds ratios and 95% confidence intervals for the association between job strain and sick absence were estimated. The modifying effect of social support was evaluated by stratification. Logistic regression was used to estimate the relationship between job strain and sick absence. RESULTS: In the bivariate analysis, the variables related to sick absence were age, marital status, occupation, job demand. Four distinctly different kinds of level of job strain were generated by the combination of job demand and job control: low strain group, high strain group, active group, and passive group. The crude odds ratio of high job strain was 1.78(95% CI: 1.26-2.53), and those of active group and passive group were 1.33(95% CI: 1.07-1.66) and 1.13 (95% CI: 0.88-1.47), respectively. The odds ratio of high job strain after adjusting for age and occupation were still significant. The odds ratio of high job strain in low social support was 5.96(95% CI: 2.45-14.51), but that in high social support was 0.73(95% CI: 0.26-2.01). CONCLUSIONS: Job strain was associated with increased risk of absenteeism from work, and social support at work modified the association between job strain and sick absence.
Summary
Association between Job characteristics and Psychosocial Distress of Industrial Workers.
Sei Jin Chang, Bong Suk Cha, Sang Baek Koh, Myung Geun Kang, Sang Ryul Koh, Jong Ku Park
Korean J Prev Med. 1997;30(1):129-144.
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AbstractAbstract PDF
This study was carried out to assess the relationship between job characteristics(job strain) and psychosocial distress, and to find out the effect of social support on psychosocial distress. The study design was cross-sectional, and included 1,211 industrial workers in middle-sized city. A self-administered questionnaire measured job characteristics(jod demand, job control), and social support(coworker support, supervisor support) at work. Psychosocial distress was measured using PWI(Psychosocial Well-being Index), a 45-item self-administered instrument. Among the 1,211 respondents, the prevalence of psychosocial distress was 24.8%. High job strain (high job demand + low job control) was present in 8% of the subjects. The crude odds ratio of high job strain was 4.76 (95% CI : 2.60-8.74), and those of active group and passive group were 3.81(95% CI : 1.82-3.95) and 2.64(95% CI : 1.77-3.94), respectively. The odds ratios of each group adjusted for sex, age, support, and religion were still significant. Our results supported the association between job strain and psychosocial distress. Social support at work, although significantly associated with psychosocial distress, did not modify the association between job strain and psychosocial distress.
Summary
The Effect of Job Stress and Social Support on the Organizational Effectiveness of Hospital Employees.
Jong Wook Ko, Young Joon Seo, Ha Young Park
Korean J Prev Med. 1996;29(2):295-308.
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AbstractAbstract PDF
The purpose of this study is to investigate the effect of job stress and social support on the organizational effectiveness of hospital employees and to examine the role of social support in the experience of job stress among the employees. Previous studies have yielded mixed results regarding the role of social support. Some studies provide supporting evidence for the buffering effect of social support, while others do not. Still others report findings about reverse buffering effects. These inconsistent findings are, in part, accounted for by methodological problems such as poor measurement, small sample size, and the existence of high multicollinearity. To examine more rigorously the role of social support in relation to the negative effects of job stress, this study was carefully designed to overcome methodolgical shortcomings found in the past research. In addition, unlike the previous studies, which were concerned mostly with health-related variables as consequences of job stress, in this study, three work-related variables (job satisfaction, organizational commitment, and intent to stay) which had close relationships with organizational effectiveness were examined as output variables. The sample used in this study consisted of 353 employees from a university hospital in the suburbs of seoul. Data were collected with self-administered questionnaires and analyzed using canonical analysis and hierarchical regression analysis. The results of this study indicate that; (l) job stress has negative main effects on job satisfaction, organizational commitment, and intent to stay; (2) social support has positive main effects on the same three output variables, (3) social support does not moderate the harmful effects of job stress on the three outcome variables, and (4) the three-way interaction effects of (social support * job stress * gender) and of (social support * job stress * education) are not supported The implications of these findings for the management of human resources are discussed.
Summary

JPMPH : Journal of Preventive Medicine and Public Health