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Original Articles
Analysis of the Incidence of Macrosomia in Japan by Parental Nationalities at 5-year Intervals From 1995 to 2020
Tasuku Okui
J Prev Med Public Health. 2023;56(4):348-356.   Published online July 3, 2023
DOI: https://doi.org/10.3961/jpmph.23.133
  • 980 View
  • 68 Download
AbstractAbstract PDFSupplementary Material
Objectives
We investigated trends in the incidence rate of macrosomia and its association with parental nationalities using Vital Statistics data in Japan.
Methods
We used singleton birth data every 5 years from 1995 to 2020. The incidence rate of macrosomia was calculated according to specific attributes (maternal age, infant’s sex, parental nationalities, parity, and household occupation) over time (years). In addition, a log-binomial model was used to investigate the relationship between the incidence of macrosomia and the attributes. This study compared Korea, China, the Philippines, Brazil, and other countries with Japan in terms of parental nationalities. “Other countries” indicates countries except for Japan, Korea, China, the Philippines, and Brazil.
Results
The study included 6 180 787 births. The rate of macrosomia in Japan decreased from 1.43% in 1995 to 0.88% in 2020, and the decrease was observed across all parental nationalities. The rates for Japanese parents were the lowest values among parental nationalities during the timespan investigated. Multivariate regression analysis showed that mothers from Korea, China, the Philippines, Brazil, and other countries had a significantly higher risk of macrosomia than those from Japan (risk ratio, 1.91, 2.82, 1.59, 1.74, and 1.64, respectively). Furthermore, fathers from China, the Philippines, Brazil, and other countries had a significantly higher risk of macrosomia than those from Japan (risk ratio, 1.66, 1.38, 1.88, and 3.02, respectively).
Conclusions
The rate of macrosomia decreased from 1995 to 2020 in Japan for parents of all nationalities, and the risk of macrosomia incidence was associated with parental nationality.
Summary
Analysis of Differences in Preterm Birth Rates According to Household Occupation in Japan From 2007 to 2019
Tasuku Okui, Naoki Nakashima
J Prev Med Public Health. 2022;55(4):371-378.   Published online June 20, 2022
DOI: https://doi.org/10.3961/jpmph.22.178
  • 2,232 View
  • 93 Download
  • 3 Crossref
AbstractAbstract PDF
Objectives
No studies have examined the association between preterm birth rates and socioeconomic factors in Japan using nationwide statistical data. We analyzed the association between preterm birth rates and household occupation using Vital Statistics data.
Methods
Aggregated Vital Statistics data from Japan from 2007 to 2019 were obtained from the Ministry of Health, Labour and Welfare. From the data, the number of births according to year, age group, gestational period, number of pregnancies, and household occupation were used in this study. Crude preterm birth rates and preterm birth rates adjusted by maternal age according to household occupation were calculated for each year. Poisson regression analysis was conducted to evaluate the association between household occupation and preterm births.
Results
Unemployed households had the highest preterm birth rate, and households with an occupation classification of “full-time worker 2” (an employee at a large company, civil servant, or board member) had the lowest preterm birth rate throughout each period. Poisson regression analysis revealed that unemployed households were statistically significantly associated with a high preterm birth risk. In contrast, the preterm birth rate adjusted by maternal age remained stable throughout each period regardless of household occupation, and preterm birth rates were found not to have increased in recent years in Japan.
Conclusions
Unemployed households had higher preterm birth rates than other household occupations. Further studies investigating the characteristics of unemployed households are needed to identify the reasons for this disparity.
Summary

Citations

Citations to this article as recorded by  
  • Analysis of an Association between Preterm Birth and Parental Educational Level in Japan Using National Data
    Tasuku Okui
    Children.2023; 10(2): 342.     CrossRef
  • Association of maternal nationality with preterm birth and low birth weight rates: analysis of nationwide data in Japan from 2016 to 2020
    Tasuku Okui, Yoko Sato, Seiichi Morokuma, Naoki Nakashima
    Maternal Health, Neonatology and Perinatology.2023;[Epub]     CrossRef
  • Does the father’s job matter? Parental occupation and preterm birth in Korea
    Taemi Kim, Eunseon Gwak, Bolormaa Erdenetuya, Jeong-Won Oh, Jung-won Yoon, Myoung-Hee Kim, Jia Ryu, Seung-Ah Choe
    Epidemiology and Health.2023; 45: e2023078.     CrossRef
Socioeconomic Predictors of Diabetes Mortality in Japan: An Ecological Study Using Municipality-specific Data
Tasuku Okui
J Prev Med Public Health. 2021;54(5):352-359.   Published online August 14, 2021
DOI: https://doi.org/10.3961/jpmph.21.215
  • 3,354 View
  • 136 Download
  • 3 Crossref
AbstractAbstract PDFSupplementary Material
Objectives
The aim of this study was to examine the geographic distribution of diabetes mortality in Japan and identify socioeconomic factors affecting differences in municipality-specific diabetes mortality.
Methods
Diabetes mortality data by year and municipality from 2013 to 2017 were extracted from Japanese Vital Statistics, and the socioeconomic characteristics of municipalities were obtained from government statistics. We calculated the standardized mortality ratio (SMR) of diabetes for each municipality using the empirical Bayes method and represented geographic differences in SMRs in a map of Japan. Multiple linear regression was conducted to identify the socioeconomic factors affecting differences in SMR. Statistically significant socioeconomic factors were further assessed by calculating the relative risk of mortality of quintiles of municipalities classified according to the degree of each socioeconomic factor using Poisson regression analysis.
Results
The geographic distribution of diabetes mortality differed by gender. Of the municipality-specific socioeconomic factors, high rates of single-person households and unemployment and a high number of hospital beds were associated with a high SMR for men. High rates of fatherless households and blue-collar workers were associated with a high SMR for women, while high taxable income per-capita income and total population were associated with low SMR for women. Quintile analysis revealed a complex relationship between taxable income and mortality for women. The mortality risk of quintiles with the highest and lowest taxable per-capita income was significantly lower than that of the middle-income quintile.
Conclusions
Socioeconomic factors of municipalities in Japan were found to affect geographic differences in diabetes mortality.
Summary

Citations

Citations to this article as recorded by  
  • Worldwide burden and trends of diabetes among people aged 70 years and older, 1990–2019: A systematic analysis for the Global Burden of Disease Study 2019
    Shimin Jiang, Tianyu Yu, Dingxin Di, Ying Wang, Wenge Li
    Diabetes/Metabolism Research and Reviews.2023;[Epub]     CrossRef
  • The Effect of Neighborhood Deprivation on Mortality in Newly Diagnosed Diabetes Patients: A Countrywide Population-Based Korean Retrospective Cohort Study, 2002–2013
    Kyoung-Hee Cho, Juyeong Kim, Young Choi, Tae-Hyun Kim
    International Journal of Environmental Research and Public Health.2022; 19(7): 4324.     CrossRef
  • Depression, cognitive dysfunction and other factors associated with 5-year overall mortality in type 2 diabetes mellitus: a pilot prospective observational study
    E. G. Starostina, M. N. Volodina, I. V. Starostin
    Diabetes mellitus.2022; 25(4): 327.     CrossRef
Age-period-cohort Analysis of Healthy Lifestyle Behaviors Using the National Health and Nutrition Survey in Japan
Tasuku Okui
J Prev Med Public Health. 2020;53(6):409-418.   Published online August 13, 2020
DOI: https://doi.org/10.3961/jpmph.20.159
  • 8,093 View
  • 205 Download
  • 9 Crossref
AbstractAbstract PDF
Objectives
This study conducted an age-period-cohort (APC) analysis of trends in healthy lifestyle behaviors in Japan.
Methods
We used National Health and Nutrition Survey data on salt intake and prevalence of smoking, drinking, and physical activity between 1995 and 2018 in Japan. Age groups were defined from 20 years to 69 years old in 10-year increments. Cohorts were defined for each age group of each year with a 1-year shift, and cohorts born in 1926-1935 (first cohort) until 1989-1998 (last cohort) were examined. We conducted a Bayesian APC analysis, calculating estimated values for each behavior by age group, period, and cohort.
Results
Estimated salt intake decreased from cohorts born in the 1930s to the 1960s, but increased thereafter in both genders, and the magnitude of increase was larger for men. Estimated smoking prevalence increased in the cohorts starting from the 1930s for men and the 1940s for women, and then decreased starting in the cohorts born in the 1970s for both genders. Although estimated drinking prevalence decreased starting in the cohorts born in approximately 1960 for men, for women it increased until the cohorts born in approximately 1970. Estimated physical activity prevalence decreased starting in the cohorts born in the 1940s in both genders, but the magnitude of decrease was larger for women.
Conclusions
Trends in cohort effects differed by gender, which might be related to changes in the social environment for women. Improvements in dietary and exercise habits are required in more recently born cohorts of both genders.
Summary

Citations

Citations to this article as recorded by  
  • Old story, new twist: reducing salt and increasing potassium intake as a social issue according to the INTERMAP Japan
    Junichi Yatabe, Kazuya Ishida, Midori Sasaki Yatabe
    Hypertension Research.2023; 46(2): 526.     CrossRef
  • Subtype prevalence and baseline visual acuity by age in Japanese patients with neovascular age-related macular degeneration
    Tomoko Sawada, Tsutomu Yasukawa, Hiroko Imaizumi, Hisashi Matsubara, Kazuhiro Kimura, Hiroto Terasaki, Hiroto Ishikawa, Tomoya Murakami, Masaru Takeuchi, Yoshinori Mitamura, Yutaro Mizusawa, Yoshihiro Takamura, Toshinori Murata, Jiro Kogo, Masahito Ohji
    Japanese Journal of Ophthalmology.2023; 67(2): 149.     CrossRef
  • Age, Period, and Cohort Analysis of Smoking Intensity Among Current Smokers in Malaysia, 1996–2015
    Chien Huey Teh, Sanjay Rampal, Kuang Hock Lim, Omar Azahadi, Aris Tahir
    Nicotine and Tobacco Research.2023; 25(7): 1340.     CrossRef
  • Comparison of Secular Trends in Esophageal Cancer Mortality in China and Japan during 1990–2019: An Age-Period-Cohort Analysis
    Ruiqing Li, Jinyi Sun, Tong Wang, Lihong Huang, Shuwen Wang, Panglin Sun, Chuanhua Yu
    International Journal of Environmental Research and Public Health.2022; 19(16): 10302.     CrossRef
  • Estimation of the Effect of Salt-Intake Reduction on Cardiovascular Mortality Decline between 1950 and 2017 in Japan: A Retrospective Simulation Study
    Takehiro Sugiyama, Nayu Ikeda, Kazuko Minowa, Nobuo Nishi
    Nutrients.2022; 14(18): 3747.     CrossRef
  • An analysis of predictors for heavy alcohol drinking using nationally representative survey data in Japan
    Tasuku Okui
    BMC Public Health.2021;[Epub]     CrossRef
  • An Age-Period-Cohort Analysis of Prevalence and Consultation Rate for Dyslipidemia in Japan
    Tasuku Okui
    Asia Pacific Journal of Public Health.2021; 33(1): 46.     CrossRef
  • An Age-Period-Cohort Analysis of Biomarkers of Lifestyle-Related Diseases Using the National Health and Nutrition Survey in Japan, 1973–2018
    Tasuku Okui
    International Journal of Environmental Research and Public Health.2020; 17(21): 8159.     CrossRef
  • Socioeconomic Disparities in All-Cause and Cause-Specific Mortality Rates among Municipalities in Japan, 1999–2019
    Tasuku Okui
    International Journal of Environmental Research and Public Health.2020; 17(24): 9213.     CrossRef
Brief Report
Age-period-cohort Analysis of Cardiovascular Disease Mortality in Japan, 1995-2018
Tasuku Okui
J Prev Med Public Health. 2020;53(3):198-204.   Published online April 14, 2020
DOI: https://doi.org/10.3961/jpmph.20.037
  • 4,664 View
  • 166 Download
  • 14 Crossref
AbstractAbstract PDFSupplementary Material
Objectives
This study aimed to analyze the mortality of heart disease (HD), ischemic heart disease (IHD), and cerebrovascular disease (CeVD) through an age-period-cohort (APC) analysis.
Methods
We used data on mortality due to cardiovascular disease from 1995 to 2018 in Japan, as determined by Vital Statistics. Age groups from 0 years to 99 years were defined by 5-year increments, and cohorts were defined for each age group of each year with a 1-year shift. We used Bayesian APC analysis to decompose the changes in the diseases’ mortality rates into age, period, and cohort effects.
Results
The period effects for all diseases decreased during the analyzed periods for both men and women. The cohort effects for men increased substantially in cohorts born from around 1940 to the 1970s for all types of cardiovascular diseases. The cohort effects of HD decreased in the cohorts born in the 1970s or later for both men and women. Regarding IHD and CeVD, either a non-increase or decrease of cohort effects was confirmed for cohorts born in the 1970s or later for men, but the effects for women showed a continuously increasing trend in the cohorts born in the 1960s or later.
Conclusions
The cohort effects for IHD and CeVD showed increasing trends in younger generations of women. This suggests that preventive approaches against cardiovascular diseases are needed, particularly for women.
Summary

Citations

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    Xiaochen Li, Mingzhou Guo, Yang Niu, Min Xie, Xiansheng Liu
    Chinese Medical Journal.2024; 137(3): 273.     CrossRef
  • Editorial comment equal access for health care for unequal outcome
    Lena Barrera
    European Journal of Preventive Cardiology.2023; 30(14): 1524.     CrossRef
  • Clinical significance of atherosclerotic risk factors differs in early and advanced stages of plaque formation: A longitudinal study in the general population
    Satoko Ojima, Takuro Kubozono, Shin Kawasoe, Takeko Kawabata, Anwar Ahmed Salim, Yoshiyuki Ikeda, Masaaki Miyata, Hironori Miyahara, Koichi Tokushige, Mitsuru Ohishi
    International Journal of Cardiology.2023; 379: 111.     CrossRef
  • Exploring factors related to heart attack complicated with hypertension using a Bayesian network model: a study based on the China Health and Retirement Longitudinal Study
    Haifen Zhang, Xiaotong Zhang, Xiaodong Yao, Qiang Wang
    Frontiers in Public Health.2023;[Epub]     CrossRef
  • Hospital-level characteristics of the standardised mortality ratio for ischemic heart disease: a retrospective observational study using Japanese administrative claim data from 2012 to 2019
    Ryo Onishi, Yosuke Hatakeyama, Kunichika Matsumoto, Kanako Seto, Koki Hirata, Yinghui Wu, Tomonori Hasegawa
    PeerJ.2022; 10: e13424.     CrossRef
  • Cardiovascular Mortality Gap Between the United States and Other High Life Expectancy Countries in 2000–2016
    Enrique Acosta, Neil Mehta, Mikko Myrskylä, Marcus Ebeling, Deborah S Carr
    The Journals of Gerontology: Series B.2022; 77(Supplement): S148.     CrossRef
  • Relationship Between Prognostic Nutrition Index and New York Heart Association Classification in Patients with Coronary Heart Disease: A RCSCD-TCM Study
    Mei Ma, Yijia Liu, Fanfan Liu, Zhu Li, Qi Cheng, Zhao Liu, Rongrong Yang, Chunquan Yu
    Journal of Inflammation Research.2022; Volume 15: 4303.     CrossRef
  • The burden of endometriosis in China from 1990 to 2019
    Yan Wang, Xiaoyan Wang, Kaijun Liao, Baoqin Luo, Jiashou Luo
    Frontiers in Endocrinology.2022;[Epub]     CrossRef
  • A Workcation Improves Cardiac Parasympathetic Function during Sleep to Decrease Arterial Stiffness in Workers
    Hideyuki Negoro, Ryota Kobayashi
    Healthcare.2022; 10(10): 2037.     CrossRef
  • Long-term trends in the incidence of endometriosis in China from 1990 to 2019: a joinpoint and age–period–cohort analysis
    Jinhui Feng, Shitong Zhang, Jiadong Chen, Jie Yang, Jue Zhu
    Gynecological Endocrinology.2021; 37(11): 1041.     CrossRef
  • Incorporating Medical Supply and Demand into the Index of Physician Maldistribution Improves the Sensitivity to Healthcare Outcomes
    Atsushi Takayama, Hemant Poudyal
    Journal of Clinical Medicine.2021; 11(1): 155.     CrossRef
  • An Age-Period-Cohort Analysis of Biomarkers of Lifestyle-Related Diseases Using the National Health and Nutrition Survey in Japan, 1973–2018
    Tasuku Okui
    International Journal of Environmental Research and Public Health.2020; 17(21): 8159.     CrossRef
  • Socioeconomic Disparities in All-Cause and Cause-Specific Mortality Rates among Municipalities in Japan, 1999–2019
    Tasuku Okui
    International Journal of Environmental Research and Public Health.2020; 17(24): 9213.     CrossRef
  • Age-period-cohort Analysis of Healthy Lifestyle Behaviors Using the National Health and Nutrition Survey in Japan
    Tasuku Okui
    Journal of Preventive Medicine and Public Health.2020; 53(6): 409.     CrossRef
Original Articles
Associations of Ambient Air Pollutant Concentrations With Respiratory Symptoms and Perceived Health Status in Japanese Adults With and Without Chronic Respiratory Diseases: A Panel Study
Motoyuki Nakao, Keiko Yamauchi, Satoshi Mitsuma, Tetsuro Odaira, Hideto Obata, Yoichi Chijimatsu, Yoko Ishihara
J Prev Med Public Health. 2019;52(6):416-426.   Published online November 13, 2019
DOI: https://doi.org/10.3961/jpmph.19.180
  • 5,485 View
  • 97 Download
  • 2 Crossref
AbstractAbstract PDFSupplementary Material
Objectives
In recent years, transboundary air pollution from mainland East Asia has led to growing concerns about air pollution in Japan. Air pollution is reportedly associated with the exacerbation of respiratory diseases. In this study, we assessed the effects of air pollution on respiratory symptoms and the health status of participants with and without chronic respiratory diseases.
Methods
Participants (n=2753) with and without chronic respiratory diseases who visited healthcare facilities in Japan during February from 2010 to 2015 filled out a self-report questionnaire regarding their symptoms and perceived health status. Participants were followed up during April-May and June-July.
Results
Oxidant concentrations were associated with respiratory symptoms, overall health, and quality of life (QoL). Suspended particulate matter (SPM) and particulate matter <2.5 μm levels were associated with physical fitness; SPM was also associated with QoL. Recent experience of an Asian sand dust event had a significant effect on allergic symptoms, change in health, and QoL.
Conclusions
Respiratory symptoms were more strongly affected by oxidants than by other pollutants. Significant associations of air pollutants were found with a comprehensive range of items related to perceived health status, including overall health and QoL. Although the effects of air pollutants on respiratory symptoms and health status were more apparent among patients with respiratory diseases, the adverse effects of air pollutants were significant even among participants without such conditions.
Summary

Citations

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  • Evaluation of the impact of energy utilization and PM on respiratory health in China
    Changfeng Shi, Xinhui Liu, Min Gu, Qinghua Pang, Zhen Shi
    Energy & Environment.2021; 32(3): 380.     CrossRef
  • Respiratory Effects of Exposure to Traffic-Related Air Pollutants During Exercise
    Giuseppe Morici, Fabio Cibella, Annalisa Cogo, Paolo Palange, Maria R. Bonsignore
    Frontiers in Public Health.2020;[Epub]     CrossRef
Perceived Environmental Pollution and Its Impact on Health in China, Japan, and South Korea
Akiko Kamimura, Bianca Armenta, Maziar Nourian, Nushean Assasnik, Kimiya Nourian, Alla Chernenko
J Prev Med Public Health. 2017;50(3):188-194.   Published online April 27, 2017
DOI: https://doi.org/10.3961/jpmph.17.044
  • 10,067 View
  • 244 Download
  • 23 Crossref
AbstractAbstract PDF
Objectives
Environmental pollution is a significant global issue. Both objective (scientifically measured) environmental pollution and perceived levels of pollution are important predictors of self-reported health. The purpose of this study was to compare the associations between perceived environmental pollution and health in China, Japan, and South Korea.
Methods
Data were obtained from the East Asian Social Survey and the Cross-National Survey Data Sets: Health and Society in East Asia, 2010 (n=7938; China, n=3866; Japan, n=2496; South Korea, n=1576).
Results
South Koreans perceived environmental pollution to be the most severe, while Japanese participants perceived environmental pollution to be the least severe. Although the Japanese did not perceive environmental pollution to be very severe, their self-rated physical health was significantly related to perceived environmental pollution, while the analogous relationships were not significant for the Chinese or Korean participants. Better mental health was related to lower levels of perceived air pollution in China, as well as lower levels of perceived all types of pollution in Japan and lower levels of perceived noise pollution in South Korea.
Conclusions
Physical and mental health and individual socio-demographic characteristics were associated with levels of perceived environmental pollution, but with different patterns among these three countries.
Summary

Citations

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    Jiahang Liu, Chun Yin, Bindong Sun
    Journal of Transport & Health.2024; 35: 101757.     CrossRef
  • Does Internet Use Increase Public Perception of Environmental Pollution?—Evidence from China
    Chengzhi Yi, Jiajun Han, Cuihong Long
    Social Indicators Research.2023; 166(3): 665.     CrossRef
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    Bingxue Han
    Qeios.2023;[Epub]     CrossRef
  • Climate change and mental health in Korea: A scoping review
    Jiyoung Shin, Juha Baek, Sumi Chae
    Journal of Climate Change Research.2023; 14(6-2): 989.     CrossRef
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    Xiaoqin Li, Yonghui Li
    Journal of Environmental Management.2022; 306: 114455.     CrossRef
  • Development and validation of a new scale to assess air quality knowledge (AQIQ)
    Alessandro Del Ponte, Lina Ang, Lianjun Li, Noah Lim, Wilson Wai San Tam, Wei Jie Seow
    Environmental Pollution.2022; 299: 118750.     CrossRef
  • Exposures, Symptoms and Risk Perception among Office Workers in Relation to Nanoparticles in the Work Environment
    Hans Orru, Henrik Olstrup, Annika Hagenbjörk, Steven Nordin, Kati Orru
    International Journal of Environmental Research and Public Health.2022; 19(10): 5789.     CrossRef
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    Lijuan Chen, Youqing Fan, Wei Guo
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    Health and Quality of Life Outcomes.2020;[Epub]     CrossRef
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    Journal of Preventive Medicine and Public Health.2018; 51(3): 130.     CrossRef
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Special Article
Burden of Disease in Japan: Using National and Subnational Data to Inform Local Health Policy
Stuart Gilmour, Yi Liao, Ver Bilano, Kenji Shibuya
J Prev Med Public Health. 2014;47(3):136-143.   Published online May 30, 2014
DOI: https://doi.org/10.3961/jpmph.2014.47.3.136
  • 15,753 View
  • 170 Download
  • 18 Crossref
AbstractAbstract PDF

The Global Burden of Disease (GBD) study has been instrumental in guiding global health policy development since the early 1990s. The GBD 2010 project provided rich information about the key causes of mortality, disability-adjusted life years, and their associated risk factors in Japan and provided a unique opportunity to incorporate these data into health planning. As part of the latest update of this project, GBD 2013, the Japanese GBD collaborators plan to update and refine the available burden of disease data by incorporating sub-national estimates of the burden of disease at the prefectural level. These estimates will provide health planners and policy makers at both the national and prefectural level with new, more refined tools to adapt local public health initiatives to meet the health needs of local populations. Moreover, they will enable the Japanese health system to better respond to the unique challenges in their rapidly aging population and as a complex combination of non-communicable disease risk factors begin to dominate the policy agenda. Regional collaborations will enable nations to learn from the experiences of other nations that may be at different stages of the epidemiological transition and have different exposure profiles and associated health effects. Such analyses and improvements in the data collection systems will further improve the health of the Japanese, maintain Japan's excellent record of health equity, and provide a better understanding of the direction of health policy in the region.

Summary

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Original Articles
Changes in Air Temperature and Its Relation to Ambulance Transports Due to Heat Stroke in All 47 Prefectures of Japan
Shoko Murakami, Nobuyuki Miyatake, Noriko Sakano
J Prev Med Public Health. 2012;45(5):309-315.   Published online September 28, 2012
DOI: https://doi.org/10.3961/jpmph.2012.45.5.309
  • 8,230 View
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  • 13 Crossref
AbstractAbstract PDF
Objectives

Changes in air temperature and its relation to ambulance transports due to heat stroke in all 47 prefectures, in Japan were evaluated.

Methods

Data on air temperature were obtained from the Japanese Meteorological Agency. Data on ambulance transports due to heat stroke was directly obtained from the Fire and Disaster Management Agency, Japan. We also used the number of deaths due to heat stroke from the Ministry of Health, Labour and Welfare, Japan, and population data from the Ministry of Internal Affairs and Communications. Chronological changes in parameters of air temperature were analyzed. In addition, the relation between air temperature and ambulance transports due to heat stroke in August 2010 was also evaluated by using an ecological study.

Results

Positive and significant changes in the parameters of air temperature that is, the mean air temperature, mean of the highest air temperature, and mean of the lowest air temperature were noted in all 47 prefectures. In addition, changes in air temperature were accelerated when adjusted for observation years. Ambulance transports due to heat stroke was significantly correlated with air temperature in the ecological study. The highest air temperature was significantly linked to ambulance transports due to heat stroke, especially in elderly subjects.

Conclusions

Global warming was demonstrated in all 47 prefectures in Japan. In addition, the higher air temperature was closely associated with higher ambulance transports due to heat stroke in Japan.

Summary

Citations

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A literature review on the health status of Korean workers under the Japanese colonialism.
Chang Yeop Kim, Ok Ryun Moon
Korean J Prev Med. 1991;24(1):45-56.
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AbstractAbstract PDF
The history of occupational health in Korea has covered the era of the Republic of Korea after the Liberation from Japanese colonialism. But the number of Korean workers exceeded about 2 millions at the times of liberation in 1945, so that it is expected that many occupational health problems inflicted Korean workers under the Japanese colonialism. The authors reviewed medical literatures, administrative documents, and other available data which were published under the colonial state, and collected things which had reference to the health status of Korean workers. The results were as follows; 1. Nutritional status of Korean workers was supposed to be inferior to of general population, some students, and poor inhabitants in a remote moutain villages. 2. It was supposed that the constitution of Korean workers was near lower limit of average build of contemporary Koreans. 3. The accidents rate in mines was significantly high but decreasing year after year, and the most importance cause of accidents was the fall of roof in the mine. The medical facilities and equipments for miners were supposed to be not sufficient in the mines and workshops. 4. Some occupational disease including silicosis, noise-induced hearing impairment, and decompression disease were known. But, overall incidence or prevalence of these diseases could not be identified. 5. On the whole, the fatalities of acute infectious diseases of Korean workers were higher than those of Japanese inhabitants in Korea and Korean inhabitants. The prevalence of pulmonary tuberculosis of Korean workers was increasing with every passing year. 6. The medical personnels and facilities were so deficient that most Korean workers were out of adequate medical use. We discussed only a part of the health status of Korean workers under the Japanese colonialism, so it would be necessary to have a better grasp of details of occupational health policy and health status in the era of afflicting.
Summary

JPMPH : Journal of Preventive Medicine and Public Health